2021 CX-9 Burning oil

You don't need the light to be on, just that it sets a code. That is the criteria. You can tell them the light came on and show them a pic if you want but you need the code stored. You could have been due for an oil change when it came on or just did an oil change early and have clean oil when you bring it in. It's not their business how soon you like to change your oil as preventative maintenance. Only the code needs to be set when you bring it in. It's not rational or expected that someone drive around with a low oil light on the dash and possibly do engine damage until they can get to or make an appointment and bring the car into the dealer!
Is the code permanent or does it clear after so many cycles? If I'm on the road and can't get to a dealer, I'm going to have to top it off. That, in theory, corrects the error condition. In that circumstance, the best I'll be able to do is read the code and print a report from the scan tool. I would be very happy (or not) to have the light go on while I'm driving home from work, because the dealer is on the way.
 

sm1ke

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'18 CX-9 Signature
Is the code permanent or does it clear after so many cycles? If I'm on the road and can't get to a dealer, I'm going to have to top it off. That, in theory, corrects the error condition. In that circumstance, the best I'll be able to do is read the code and print a report from the scan tool. I would be very happy (or not) to have the light go on while I'm driving home from work, because the dealer is on the way.

I think what @Tchman2016 is trying to say is that when the low oil light comes on, it triggers a code, and that information (code trigger) is stored in the car's systems. When you top off the oil, the low oil light turns off, but the system continues to store the code trigger information, which can then be accessed by the dealer.

All this to say that you can drive until the light is triggered in order to get the car to save the code, then top up the oil so that you don't have to drive around with a low oil level. Then you go to the dealership, tell them the oil light went off and that you topped it up, and then they should check to see if there are any stored codes. If the applicable code(s) are stored, they can proceed with the instructions in the TSB.
 
I think what @Tchman2016 is trying to say is that when the low oil light comes on, it triggers a code, and that information (code trigger) is stored in the car's systems. When you top off the oil, the low oil light turns off, but the system continues to store the code trigger information, which can then be accessed by the dealer.

All this to say that you can drive until the light is triggered in order to get the car to save the code, then top up the oil so that you don't have to drive around with a low oil level. Then you go to the dealership, tell them the oil light went off and that you topped it up, and then they should check to see if there are any stored codes. If the applicable code(s) are stored, they can proceed with the instructions in the TSB.
Yes thank you sm1ke! That's exactly what I was trying to say.
 
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2021 CX-9
At the dealer now with my 2021 CX-9. Roughly 16K miles. Same symptoms of low oil light coming on after 4K miles into the oil change cycle. This is the second oil change that I've raised the issue. At dropoff, the dealer immediately asked to keep the car a week to do the valve seals. It looks like they can only process 2 of these repairs per week though.

I deferred to later in the month since I can't downsize to a CX-50 loaner this week, but you should plan to be without the car for a period of time at least early on as they get going on these repairs.
 

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E4w

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Mazda 6s
Hey guys, why is everyone waiting so long between oil changes??? An oil change is much less expensive than a new engine. These new direct injected engines without port fuel injection is a carbon nightmare… I change mine every 3500 miles max with 50/50 city and HWY, using Mobile 1 oil filter and Penzoil Ultra Platinum 5w30. I’m at 42,000 miles on my 2020 CX-9 Touring. I bought it new.
 
@E4w
Your engine AND turbo thank you! That is the absolute best mindset and way to do it to protect your investment and have the longest possible engine life. For what amounts to $30 or less for fully synthetic oil and oil and filter as a diy, its a no brainier to change it every 4k miles and have that fuzzy feeling and satisfaction, confidence and certainty that you are taking care of your baby the right way. Oil is cheap, engines with turbos are NOT.

One thing I would do is use the oem Tokyo Roki Factory oil filter made in Japan. You can get them on partsbouq.com or from them on ebay. They ship from the United Arab Emirates and they are 100% legit. Order like 20 of them and they come out less than buying an aftermarket brand, including shipping. They are specifically made for the 2.5T engine whereas the aftermarket are not, pressure and flow rate wise.
 
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E4w

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Mazda 6s
@E4w
Your engine AND turbo thank you! That is the absolute best mindset and way to do it to protect your investment and have the longest possible engine life. For what amounts to $30 or less for fully synthetic oil and oil and filter as a diy, its a no brainier to change it every 4k miles and have that fuzzy feeling and satisfaction, confidence and certainty that you are taking care of your baby the right way. Oil is cheap, engines with turbos are NOT.

One thing I would do is use the oem Tokyo Roki Factory oil filter made in Japan. You can get them on partsbouq.com or from them on ebay. They ship from the United Arab Emirates and they are 100% legit. Order like 20 of them and they come out less than buying an aftermarket brand, including shipping. They are specifically made for the 2.5T engine whereas the aftermarket are not, pressure and flow rate wise.
Thanks for the heads up, I’ll check them out. I haven’t been on the forums in a while,
 
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2021 CX-9 Sig
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2021 CX-5 GT
Hey guys, why is everyone waiting so long between oil changes??? An oil change is much less expensive than a new engine. These new direct injected engines without port fuel injection is a carbon nightmare… I change mine every 3500 miles max with 50/50 city and HWY, using Mobile 1 oil filter and Penzoil Ultra Platinum 5w30. I’m at 42,000 miles on my 2020 CX-9 Touring. I bought it new.

Because Mazda and every oil manufacture recommend oil changes of 7500 or 10K miles. All modern cars can and should go 10K miles between oil changes.

The 2021 models burn oil. Why does everyone question that? Mazda has admitted the fact and has a repair in place.

You honestly are just wasting oil and money. And your 2020 is not impacted by this issue.
 
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
Because Mazda and every oil manufacture recommend oil changes of 7500 or 10K miles. All modern cars can and should go 10K miles between oil changes.

The 2021 models burn oil. Why does everyone question that? Mazda has admitted the fact and has a repair in place.

You honestly are just wasting oil and money. And your 2020 is not impacted by this issue.
Like Dougal mentioned, to keep warranty up to 7500 miles is ok and my UOA reports suggested my oil would last up to 9000.

Oil changes by shops are expensive and potentially sub-standard oil, filters may be used as well as improper install.

DIY for working folk with other personal/family commitments
Is time consuming to change every month or two.

For most folk, 6000 to 7500 is just fine and could possibly be extended to 9000 after warranty.
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
Hey guys, why is everyone waiting so long between oil changes??? An oil change is much less expensive than a new engine. These new direct injected engines without port fuel injection is a carbon nightmare… I change mine every 3500 miles max with 50/50 city and HWY, using Mobile 1 oil filter and Penzoil Ultra Platinum 5w30. I’m at 42,000 miles on my 2020 CX-9 Touring. I bought it new.
When is the last time you heard of an oil change related engine failure in a properly working engine? With oil change intervals of around 3k miles, I'd wager you came up during the 70s/80s when that was the norm

btw, the models that have had their recent redesigns (3, 30, 50) all have 10k oil change intervals with the same engines
 
When is the last time you heard of an oil change related engine failure in a properly working engine? With oil change intervals of around 3k miles, I'd wager you came up during the 70s/80s when that was the norm

btw, the models that have had their recent redesigns (3, 30, 50) all have 10k oil change intervals with the same engines
10k oil changes or longer are nothing more than EPA influence on manufacturers along with planned obsolescence implemented by manufacturers to get you to buy another vehicle... when, not if... the powertrain breaks down after the factory warranty expires. Recommended intervals are not good practice for long term reliability and performance. Its just plain ignorant to think that so called " lifetime transmission fluid" as one example does not need to be changed and is good for your transmission. Its a complete falacy and misnomer to believe that manufacturers have your best interest in mind. Their " lifetime fluid" is means lifetime of the transmission which really means the factory warranty time frame. They could care less after it expires.

It doesnt matter how much longer oil can go based on oul analysis. What matters is the carbon and combustion deposits slowly and surely acting as sandpaper grinding and wearing bearings, cams, cranks, journels, valves and gears internally amongst other components reducing their service life. So, go ahead and follow those recommendations and then shell out big dollars when it breaks down due to this and sludge buildup OR, Throw your money away like the disposable society we live in and buy another. And for those that say changing oil at 3k is living in the past, well thats just ignorant as well because engines back then were simple, however engines today and their extremely tight tolerances and heat buildup are extremely complex and have evolved to a point where the technology in them is guranteed to fail at some point whether in or out of warranty. They absolutely need more frequent fluid changes and general service to keep them on the road, reliable and for as long as possible. Its foolhardy to think otherwise. Yes oil has also come along way in protection but is thinner than ever but dirt is dirt that needs to be purged regardless.
 
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
Theres 3 camps:

Camp 1 never changes there oil..going 10,000, 12,000 and 15,000 miles between oil changes. Poor engine.
Camp 2 changes oil every 5000 to 7500 miles as per manufacturer recommends.
Camp 3 changes oil frequently every 2500/3000 miles.

Having been in camp 2, both my Toyota and Ford engines outlasted the frames at over 14 years and over 200 k miles. The 7500 mile recommended interval is fine. Imo, the $$ and time spent on extra oil changes is $$/time better spent on fluid film. A clean working engines no good without a frame.
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
10k oil changes or longer are nothing more than EPA influence on manufacturers along with planned obsolescence implemented by manufacturers to get you to buy another vehicle... when, not if... the powertrain breaks down after the factory warranty expires. Recommended intervals are not good practice for long term reliability and performance. Its just plain ignorant to think that so called " lifetime transmission fluid" as one example does not need to be changed and is good for your transmission. Its a complete falacy and misnomer to believe that manufacturers have your best interest in mind. Their " lifetime fluid" is means lifetime of the transmission which really means the factory warranty time frame. They could care less after it expires.

It doesnt matter how much longer oil can go based on oul analysis. What matters is the carbon and combustion deposits slowly and surely acting as sandpaper grinding and wearing bearings, cams, cranks, journels, valves and gears internally amongst other components reducing their service life. So, go ahead and follow those recommendations and then shell out big dollars when it breaks down due to this and sludge buildup OR, Throw your money away like the disposable society we live in and buy another. And for those that say changing oil at 3k is living in the past, well thats just ignorant as well because engines back then were simple, however engines today and their extremely tight tolerances and heat buildup are extremely complex and have evolved to a point where the technology in them is guranteed to fail at some point whether in or out of warranty. They absolutely need more frequent fluid changes and general service to keep them on the road, reliable and for as long as possible. Its foolhardy to think otherwise. Yes oil has also come along way in protection but is thinner than ever but dirt is dirt that needs to be purged regardless.
Does Europe have an EPA too? Mazda's oil change interval over there is 20,000 km (12,500 mi)
 
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Mazda CX-9 Signature
I think the example of "lifetime" fluid is a good reason why I cannot trust the factory recommendation. To me, this boils down to just because you could doesn't mean you should and that's why I change every 5k
 
Theres 3 camps:

Camp 1 never changes there oil..going 10,000, 12,000 and 15,000 miles between oil changes. Poor engine.
Camp 2 changes oil every 5000 to 7500 miles as per manufacturer recommends.
Camp 3 changes oil frequently every 2500/3000 miles.

Having been in camp 2, both my Toyota and Ford engines outlasted the frames at over 14 years and over 200 k miles. The 7500 mile recommended interval is fine. Imo, the $$ and time spent on extra oil changes is $$/time better spent on fluid film. A clean working engines no good without a frame.
well I guess I fall into camp 2 and 3. For milage, Camp 2 is just habit, and then that oil goes into the old farm truck and the old farm truck oil goes into the shop barrel for heating , or fueling the tractor.

camp 3, depends on how hard I have been using the vehicle, usually because hauling way more weight then normal thru mountain passes
 

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