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P0660 P2009 P0171 Protege5 Codes

Hey I’m 16, and this 2003 Mazda Protege5 is my first car. These codes P0660, P2009, P0171 were thrown from the check engine light. I haven’t had it for very long bought it from a shady used car dealership. If you know anything about these codes and how to fix them or if they need to be fixed that would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

i12drivemyMP5

___ 323F ___
Contributor
P2009 is intake runner control circuit low voltage which sounds like the vics solenoid on the intake manifold white and green with vacuum line and electrical plug.

P0660 is intake manifold tuning valve circuit open which also sounds like that white/ green valve is faulty. There are 2 of them on the intake, one for vtcs flaps by the head and one for vics flaps in middle of intake manifold. vtcs is for cold start and vics is for over 5k rpm rerouting of intake air to shorter route to head.

P0171 is a lean code. Replace one or both of those solenoids on intake and see if lean code goes away too. or first check and make sure no problems with vacuum line going to both of those solenoids before spending money. might just be line unplugged or faulty vacuum line to vics. if not then replace them and if lean code still there then start checking around for other posible air leaks......like cracks in the accordion piece of the air intake. may have to remove it to find out for sure because leaks hide in the creases.
 
If I were to just take it to a mechanic do you have any idea how expensive it would end up to fix all of this stuff? Sorry if this is a dumb question
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
Those solenoids are really quite easy to replace, and they're cheap.

Almost everyone here on this forum has had to replace them.

A mechanic may charge you as much as $100 per solenoid plus labor.

This is the Canadian price, you'd pay less

Screenshot_20210808-134859_Amazon Shopping.jpg



It's these two solenoids...


20210808_135914.jpg
20210808_140054.jpg



Screenshot_20210808-140737_Acrobat for Samsung.jpg
 
Last edited:

BenjiHoggi

OEM+
:
Oregon, USA
:
22v Protege5
Those solenoids are really quite easy to replace, and they're cheap.

Almost everyone here on this forum has had to replace them.

A mechanic may charge you as much as $100 per solenoid plus labor.

This is the Canadian price, you'd pay less

View attachment 301889


It's these two solenoids...


View attachment 301891 View attachment 301892


View attachment 301895
I will second what PCB said. Do not go to a mechanic, you will spend money unnecessarily. I've had to replace one of mine, and I keep another in the glove box. I found some at the junkyard, and they were like $5 each there. I'd still recommend buying them new, but seeing how they came on/off on a junkyard engine was helpful for me, and I could assure that they were the right ones (there has been some confusion in the past about part numbers between identical looking solenoids).
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I will second what PCB said. Do not go to a mechanic, you will spend money unnecessarily.
... seeing how they came on/off on a "junked backyard" engine was helpful for me,.. lol

I thought that I'd post some pictures...

This is how you remove the vacuum hoses.
They end up getting stuck and have to be "broken" free.

Don't pull on the vacuum hose if its stuck, you may break something.

Pry the tube off with a flathead screwdriver, or grip it lightly and twist it with a pliers to "crack" it loose.


20210810_155215.jpg



Don't pull on the wires of the connector. They will break.

Grip the connector with a pliers and wobble it around to crack it free, then pull...


20210810_153341.jpg



The pliers pushes the locking clip down then holds the connector firmly.

20210810_153352.jpg



The solenoid connects to the bracket like this...

There is a lip/clip on the solenoid that snaps into the bracket.

Push it down and out of the way.


20210810_153145.jpg
20210810_154502.jpg


20210810_151807.jpg




The oval plug thing is a vent/filter.

20210810_153627.jpg



It can be removed and put on the proper port.


Take a bunch of pictures of what you have before you surf any work.

Do one solenoid at a time.

The vacuum tubes and electrical connectors can be removed first.

Then you can even break the old solenoid off.

The new solenoid will just push in until it clicks.


(there has been some confusion in the past about part numbers between identical looking solenoids).


They're all pretty much the same.

My pictures are from the PRC solenoid valve that I replaced.

It's the same solenoid, but it has one brass port.

It may be a better quality solenoid because it's working with the fuel control system ??
 
Last edited:
I thought that I'd post some pictures...

This is how you remove the vacuum hoses.
They end up getting stuck and have to be "broken" free.

Don't pull on the vacuum hose if its stuck, you may break something.

Pry the tube off with a flathead screwdriver, or grip it lightly and twist it with a pliers to "crack" it loose.


View attachment 301945


Don't pull on the wires of the connector. They will break.

Grip the connector with a pliers and wobble it around to crack it free, then pull...


View attachment 301946


The pliers pushes the locking clip down then holds the connector firmly.

View attachment 301947


The solenoid connects to the bracket like this...

There is a lip/clip on the solenoid that snaps into the bracket.

Push it down and out of the way.


View attachment 301950 View attachment 301948

View attachment 301949



The oval plug thing is a vent/filter.

View attachment 301960


It can be removed and put on the proper port.


Take a bunch of pictures of what you have before you surf any work.

Do one solenoid at a time.

The vacuum tubes and electrical connectors can be removed first.

Then you can even break the old solenoid off.

The new solenoid will just push in until it clicks.





They're all pretty much the same.

My pictures are from the PRC solenoid valve that I replaced.

It's the same solenoid, but it has one brass port.

It may be a better quality solenoid because it's working with the fuel control system ??
Thanks so much for all of that, I really appreciate it. I wont take it to a mechanic for the solenoid proble, but what about the intake manifold code. Is that something I should take it to a mechanic for?
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
No...
Replace your solenoids.

Changing out your solenoids will probably fix your codes and turn the CEL off..
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
You can do this Flunky ..

It's not rocket science...

Don't let a mechanic take you under...

Easy Peasy...

Go for it...
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
There you go...

Get Er Done...
Lol

You've got everything you need...

Pictures and Friends..
Lol
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
If I dont feel confident doing it myself...

I remember when I was 16.

I went at my car with a hammer and a Vise-Grips.

I broke a lot of s***, but I figured out how stuff works...

You and your friends can do this...


Saving $400 helps pay for pizza for you and your friends...
 
I will second what PCB said.
3rd that.
Do not go to a mechanic, you will spend money unnecessarily. I've had to replace one of mine, and I keep another in the glove box. I found some at the junkyard, and they were like $5 each there. I'd still recommend buying them new, but seeing how they came on/off on a junkyard engine was helpful for me, and I could assure that they were the right ones

(there has been some confusion in the past about part numbers between identical looking solenoids).
https://www.amazon.com/dp/ (commissions earned)
On Sale $9.99 each plus free 2-day shipping if you are a Prime member.

All 3 are the same part - I recommend you replace all three (if you can afford it).

The only differences between the 3 is that the PRC solenoid (also shown in PCB's illustration above and below) is mounted sideways on a separate metal bracket, faces the firewall with the (brown) electrical connector plugged in from the rear, and its reconfigurable filter cap is swapped to the front vacuum port facing forward like the VTCS and the VICS solenoids. The wiring connectors and pins are the same.
Those solenoids are really quite easy to replace, and they're cheap.

Almost everyone here on this forum has had to replace them.
YUP - And if you happen to pop a P0455 CEL, that's the vapor cannister purge valve located on the breather tube going to the throttle body.

PCB had to steer me to it as the new replacement one plugs in a little different vs the OEM one that threw me off.

A mechanic may charge you as much as $100 per solenoid plus labor.


This is the Canadian price, you'd pay less




It's these two solenoids...


View attachment 301891 View attachment 301892


View attachment 301895

Hahaha yea we can
-The hardest part of any new thing is starting something you've never done before.

-Once you finish it you'll probably think or say to yourself, "that wasn't so bad".

-While you're doing it, you might b**** and moan and maybe come up with some new combination of cuss words that never crossed the lips of another human being (but trust me... you won't be the first...or last).🤬

-And the next time you do it...it'll be a piece of cake...🍰
 
3rd that.



https://www.amazon.com/dp/ (commissions earned)
On Sale $9.99 each plus free 2-day shipping if you are a Prime member.

All 3 are the same part - I recommend you replace all three (if you can afford it).

The only differences between the 3 is that the PRC solenoid (also shown in PCB's illustration above and below) is mounted sideways on a separate metal bracket, faces the firewall with the (brown) electrical connector plugged in from the rear, and its reconfigurable filter cap is swapped to the front vacuum port facing forward like the VTCS and the VICS solenoids. The wiring connectors and pins are the same.

YUP - And if you happen to pop a P0455 CEL, that's the vapor cannister purge valve located on the breather tube going to the throttle body.

PCB had to steer me to it as the new replacement one plugs in a little different vs the OEM one that threw me off.




-The hardest part of any new thing is starting something you've never done before.

-Once you finish it you'll probably think or say to yourself, "that wasn't so bad".

-While you're doing it, you might b**** and moan and maybe come up with some new combination of cuss words that never crossed the lips of another human being (but trust me... you won't be the first...or last).🤬

-And the next time you do it...it'll be a piece of cake...🍰
Hey if you’re still there, my p5 will have a rough or fluctuating idle sometimes and very randomly. Could that be caused by the solenoids?