Trade-Up? 2021 CX-5 or 2023 CX-5 (or CX-50)?

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2021 Acura RDX
Hey guys,

Need some thoughts and opinions here. I currently have a 2019 GTR (love it), and my wife has a 17' Subaru Legacy. I would like to upgrade her car, and she also really likes my CX-5. So, I am really debating if I should get her a 2021 Sig, or wait it out for the 2023 redesign? Anyone else on the fence like me? I like the rumors I am hearing about the 2023 model, so I'm hesitant to pull the plug on a 2021. However, that infotainment center would be a nice upgrade :)

Thanks all!
 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
The Subaru Legacy is now 4 years old; add another 1.5 years for the release of the 2023 model Mazda CX-5. A 6 year old vehicle is not old or unsafe. If the current vehicle is properly maintained and not giving you any headaches, I'd say squirrel away a few more nickels until the 2023 model releases. If you don't like it -- there will be deals on the 2022 model :).
 
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2021 Acura RDX
Good point! So far, the Subaru has been a great vehicle! It currently has 62k miles on it, so its definitely got a lot of life left in it. I think I'll just wait it out for the 2023 model.
 

PaulZooms

16.5 GT Sensing
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Lakewood, CO
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2016.5 CX-5 GT
I’m waiting on the 2023 CX-50 before deciding what to buy next. Will be comparing the top trim vs a more expensive (?) Genesis GV-70 mid trim and the Santa Fe Ltd hybrid or PEV.
 
Two problems with waiting for the 2023 redesign:

1. That is a long wait. And if Mazda releases the redesigned CX-5 in the spring of 2023, you are talking 2 yrs for its release.

2. I’ve always heard it is NOT good to buy 1st year redesigned vehicles. Wait a year or two and let the manufacturers work some bugs out. But then, if you are OK with running back and forth to the dealership for warranty work, good for you. I speak from very limited experience, however. Prior to my 2021 CX-5, my only other new car was a 1972 Chevy Vega GT (introduced in 1971). Yep, history showed I should have waited on Chevy to work out the bugs, which it never really did in its 7 yr production run.
 
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2019 CX-5 AWD
I’ve always heard it is NOT good to buy 1st year redesigned vehicles. Wait a year or two and let the manufacturers work some bugs out. But then, if you are OK with running back and forth to the dealership for warranty work, good for you. I speak from very limited experience, however. Prior to my 2021 CX-5, my only other new car was a 1972 Chevy Vega GT (introduced in 1971). Yep, history showed I should have waited on Chevy to work out the bugs, which it never really did in its 7 yr production run.

This is universal wisdom. Mazda and Toyota/Lexus are not exempt from this phenomenon. The CX-5 has gotten more reliable over time.

 
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2019 Mazda CX-5 GT Reserve
Prior to my 2021 CX-5, my only other new car was a 1972 Chevy Vega GT
Slightly off topic but my first new car was a 1974 Chevy Vega GT during which time my brother had a purchased new 1973 Mazda RX3. They pretty much fell apart at the same time.
 

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Virginia
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2021 CX-5 White
Two problems with waiting for the 2023 redesign:

1. That is a long wait. And if Mazda releases the redesigned CX-5 in the spring of 2023, you are talking 2 yrs for its release.

2. I’ve always heard it is NOT good to buy 1st year redesigned vehicles. Wait a year or two and let the manufacturers work some bugs out. But then, if you are OK with running back and forth to the dealership for warranty work, good for you. I speak from very limited experience, however. Prior to my 2021 CX-5, my only other new car was a 1972 Chevy Vega GT (introduced in 1971). Yep, history showed I should have waited on Chevy to work out the bugs, which it never really did in its 7 yr production run.
I agree it is a long wait. And the first year may be have more problems than usual because it is not necessarily the same old tech on a new platform. The RWD/AWD based, inline six, or new 4may have some sort of mild hybrid built in, if I remember some articles...

Despite my "sage" advice, I ignored all this when we bought our 2014 CX5 in May 2013, as a 2014 model, so one of the first 2.5L in our area. No real problems to speak of that were not covered under warranty, usually at the regular service intervals. Car never left us stranded or calling for help. I switched to full synthetic, after a year, and the car has been sold to another family member late last year, and is doing great, but just about anything does great during COVID.

Tires, brakes, and fluid changes only. The auto transmission may not be as smooth. When sampling the same 6 speed tuned for a 2016 Mazda 6 with Sport Mode, and the 21 CX5, you can tell Mazda has evolved the tranny quite a bit, but I think the changes are probably all due to programming.

Not sure if the turbo has a beefed up transmission, however.
 
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
Okay, let's look at the "don't buy a new model the 1st year" anecdotally. - Did the 2017 CX-5 have a bunch of issues? What about when they put the Turbo in the 2019? Personally I think the 'new model' philosophy is wrong. Also, if you wait 2 years after the new introduction, then you can say it will only be a another 2 years until the next version comes out.

Personally, if something new comes out and I like it, I'm buying it.
YMMV
 

CarpeDiem

Under Pressure
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Superstitions
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2021 CE Turbo
“Did the 2017 CX-5 have a bunch of issues?”
Some folks thought so.....

“What about when they put the Turbo in the 2019?”
That was hardly a new engine, having been introduced in 2015/2016. Just another proven option.

But its your money, spend it when you want to.
 
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
“What about when they put the Turbo in the 2019?”
That was hardly a new engine, having been introduced in 2015/2016. Just another proven option.
didn't say it was a new engine, just a new configuration. And I stand by the fact, that if you wait 2 years for 'all the kinks to get worked out', there will the be a new model just another 2 years away.

Yes, of course it's my money - duh. I choose not to wait to enjoy a new toy and have 2 more years gone by. And after my post, you'll notice I said that everyone should do what meets their needs. As did you.
 
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2021 CX-9 Sig
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2021 CX-5 GT
I always say buy for now. The large architecture is supposed to be available late 2022 as a 2023 model but who knows. I would also argue that buying the first generation is fine but often there are dramatic improvements after the first year. Think of what they did with the sky-X engine. They improved it dramatically this year.
 
I always say buy for now. The large architecture is supposed to be available late 2022 as a 2023 model but who knows. I would also argue that buying the first generation is fine but often there are dramatic improvements after the first year. Think of what they did with the sky-X engine. They improved it dramatically this year.
I‘m a new Mazda CX-5 owner. It’s my 1st Mazda. I have done much reading on Mazdas, but I am not familiar with all the improvements on the 2021(?) Sky-X engine. I would be interested in knowing what some of the modifications/improvements are.
 
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2021 CX-9 Sig
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2021 CX-5 GT
I‘m a new Mazda CX-5 owner. It’s my 1st Mazda. I have done much reading on Mazdas, but I am not familiar with all the improvements on the 2021(?) Sky-X engine. I would be interested in knowing what some of the modifications/improvements are.

They increased the torque by 12 lbs and is available across the wide range of RPM, which was a bit of an issue with the original 2.0 Sky-X and increased HP a bit as well. At the same time, they improved the MPG and C02 emissions.

If you look at the 2.0 Sky X engine now, it is roughly a 188 hp and 177 lb engine. Which is not that far off from the 2.5 Sky active G engine but with ~30-35% better fuel economy. Basically, it is finally what they said it would be but was not in the first generation.

 
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2017 Mazda CX-5 GT, 2016 Mazda6 iGT, 2014 Mazda3 sGT hatchback
'17 CX5 was arguably not a full model change from 1st gen. The chassis is basically the same with more insulation (hence, heavier and slower), new interior and exterior. I would call it an extensive MMC.

Other than the occasionally creaking power seat when I drive it, it has no issues whatsoever after 3+ yrs. (knock on wood :) )
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
I plan to wait for the 2035 model. That is unless my car gets wrecked or turns out to have too many issues in its old age. At the current rate I drive it, maybe it will last 20, 25 years.
 
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
For some people net cost is a consideration also. So if in two years the 2023 cost is $1,000 more than it is now (+ $500 per year seems typical), your car might be worth $3,000 less when you sell it in 2 years.
 

CarpeDiem

Under Pressure
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Superstitions
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2021 CE Turbo
Mazda considers it more than just a “mid-model update” regardless of opinion. Pre-2017 CXs were given the model designation KE. 2017 on are KF models. Seems pretty definitive to me...
 
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Florida
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2021 CX5 Signature
Remember Mazda is interested in moving its vehicles into the luxury group. New inline 6 cylinder engines are not cheap. Don’t be surprised if significant changes are coming in vehicle size and design, along with move luxury equipment. All that adds costs for our CX5. I would suspect costs per redesigned vehicles could jump several thousand dollars.