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Stripped tensioner bolt - powersteering belt

Keep in mind the grade of the nut.

You probably want hardened steel which is normally a dark color.

Soft metal is usually shiny.

(Although I'd use soft metal instead of spending 20+ dollars on OEM.)

View attachment 303310

The thing is, the other side of the "bolt" has an eyelet for the adjustment screw. This is what I need... mind you I can find a replacement bolt thing but they don't seem to come with the nut, which is tge thing that is stripped. I'll try autozone or Napa to see what they have but if they don't have anything, I'll either try to find something that works or just pay the freaking 20 dollars and be done with the headache (and gas going back and forth).
 

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Also important, the head hex size might be 14mm but the bolt is most likely M10 and will be classified as such :D that'll be the 14mm nuts in the store were way to big

10mm hexes are usually M6
12-13mm are usually M8
16-17mm are usually M10 apart from fine threads and flange bolts which have a 14mm head
19mm are usually M12

That particular nut is probably M10 fine thread

Most if not all the threads on the Pro5 are metric fine threads, some are extra fine like the top studs on the front struts

Good luck!
I didn't know that.. thank you for the info, this helps. Good people on this forum...
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
If the eyelet bolt has good thread, then all you need is a nut with metric threading.

Just find a nut.
You don't need the whole bolt, especially if it doesn't come with a nut.

Even a wrecking yard should have something for like ten cents.

Make sure it from a metric car.
(Japanese.)
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
You want a flange nut, which is common on cars.

There's all kinds of those nuts all around our cars.


You might be able to take one off your strut tower.

It's got four of them, you only need three. Lol

Screenshot_20210929-205729_Amazon Shopping.jpg


A regular nut with a washer can vibrate loose and slip.
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
If you message me your address, I'll mail you a few nuts.

I've got a parts car just waiting to give up some parts.

No charge.
It costs like 3 bucks to ship to the US.
(it's just got to fit through the measurement slot at the post office.)
 
:
2x 2001 SP20 323's
Because I stripped the same part yesterday, and broke the long bolt in three!

20210929_173223.jpg


The adjuster nut/ eyelet is M10 x 1.25 (Fine thread) , the long bolt is M8 x 1.25 (Course thread)

The strut top nuts are M10 x 1.0 so won't work unfortunately

Hope that helps!
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I just took my adjuster mechanism apart, and it's a different design.

I've got two bolts instead.

20210930_103629.jpg



Also, I'm almost positive that you don't need to remove that stripped nut (or bolt).

There should be enough thread on the long bolt to loosen up the alternator pully enough to get the belt off, and the new one installed.

If that stripped nut (or bolt) is seized, then you can probably just leave it be.

You can completely remove the long bolt, and your alternator will pivot freely.
 
I just took my adjuster mechanism apart, and it's a different design.

I've got two bolts instead.

View attachment 303428


Also, I'm almost positive that you don't need to remove that stripped nut (or bolt).

There should be enough thread on the long bolt to loosen up the alternator pully enough to get the belt off, and the new one installed.

If that stripped nut (or bolt) is seized, then you can probably just leave it be.

You can completely remove the long bolt, and your alternator will pivot freely.
I have to take off the power steering belt to take off the alternator belt. So you're saying I can just use the adjustment bolt on the power steering to move it enough to slip the belt off? I appreciate the time you are taking on this. I don't know a lot about cars but I'm figuring it out
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I have to take off the power steering belt to take off the alternator belt. So you're saying I can just use the adjustment bolt on the power steering to move it enough to slip the belt off?

Yes, all you need to do is loosen each belt enough to slide it off the pulley.

I appreciate the time you are taking on this. I don't know a lot about cars but I'm figuring it out

No problem, I like doing this.

I think that I'd rather do this than actually work on my car. Lol
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
EDIT: I was mistaken.

I went out and checked my alternator adjustor and You DO have to loosen that short bolt, to allow the alternator to move.

And the OEM part looks like this, it has a short bolt and a long bolt.


20211001_164952.jpg




It's also a 12 mm bolt head.

You may have a hard time getting a 12 mm wrench or socket on that bolt head now that it's kinda chewed up.


I managed to fit a 3/8" drive ratchet and socket in there.

Try to avoid using a 12 point socket or wrench on that bolt.
12 point sockets and wrenches tend to strip the bolt head much easier.

20211001_164511.jpg


An open ended wrench is even worse, it only grabs two flats of the bolt.
(But, if that's all you have or that will fit, then you'll have to use it.)

20211001_165938.jpg
 
EDIT: I was mistaken.

I went out and checked my alternator adjustor and You DO have to loosen that short bolt, to allow the alternator to move.

And the OEM part looks like this, it has a short bolt and a long bolt.


View attachment 303456



It's also a 12 mm bolt head.

You may have a hard time getting a 12 mm wrench or socket on that bolt head now that it's kinda chewed up.


I managed to fit a 3/8" drive ratchet and socket in there.

Try to avoid using a 12 point socket or wrench on that bolt.
12 point sockets and wrenches tend to strip the bolt head much easier.

View attachment 303455

An open ended wrench is even worse, it only grabs two flats of the bolt.
(But, if that's all you have or that will fit, then you'll have to use it.)

View attachment 303457
Pcb, you rock, man! Thank you for all your help!
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I was all mixed up and thought we were talking about the alternator adjustor bolt.


This is what is being talked about...


20211001_195924.jpg
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
OK, I've got 4 nuts for you.

20211002_141131.jpg



The strut nuts fit on the eyelet on the car.

I dunno?

They are Tokico Blue struts.
Maybe they had different threading ?

20211002_141404.jpg


20211002_141413.jpg



I'll mail them to you on Monday.

The nut off the eyelet was pretty rusty (but the thread looks good).

The other 3 nuts are in better shape.

I've got one nut left to hold my strut from falling out. Lol
 
Awesome! I thought those looked like the same size nut but I didn't know if I should take one off the strut because my car is a daily driver... I'm glad to get this issue fixed finally. You'd think when they sell the bolt, they'd include the nut that goes on the other end :/ Thanks again, man.
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I just thought of checking the rear struts.
I might be able to get a shiny rust free nut.

The top of the rear struts are inside the trunk.
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I scored...
The nuts are slightly different.
They are taller with more threads, but they don't have the built-in lock washer on the end.

20211003_093925.jpg


20211003_093956.jpg



All of them thread onto the eyelet bolt.


20211003_094713.jpg




I'll send you two of each. You can decide which one you want to use.

All the nuts are a tiny bit rounded, but the 14 mm socket fits right on it.
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
Because I stripped the same part yesterday, and broke the long bolt in three!

View attachment 303420

The adjuster nut/ eyelet is M10 x 1.25 (Fine thread) , the long bolt is M8 x 1.25 (Course thread)

The strut top nuts are M10 x 1.0 so won't work unfortunately

Hope that helps!


I don't know why your strut top nuts don't fit the eyelet bolt?

Maybe your New Zealand cars are different?, Or maybe my aftermarket struts are different?

I didn't try a nut from my DD, because I don't want to mess with the car unless I have to.



I found this info as well...

Metric Threads Explained
The size of a metric fastener (screw, bolt, etc.) is generally specified as diameter, pitch and length, all in millimeters (mm). Metric fasteners are usually classified as either coarse or fine, referring to their thread pitch, although some sizes are available in an extra fine thread. Coarse is the most common metric thread and is assumed when pitch isn't specified.

Consider this size…

M8-1.0 x 20

Here's what the description means…

M = Metric thread designation

8 = Nominal diameter, in millimeters

1.0 = Pitch (distance from thread to thread), in millimeters

20 = Length, in millimeters

Remember these tips about metric fasteners…

Diameter: the larger the number, the larger the screw or bolt

Pitch: the larger the number, the more coarse the thread (the fewer the threads per unit of measure); coarse is the most common metric thread and is assumed when pitch isn't specified

Length: the larger the number, the longer the screw or bolt

Standard: the DIN or ISO standard number describes the fastener
 
:
2x 2001 SP20 323's
I don't know why your strut top nuts don't fit the eyelet bolt?

Maybe your New Zealand cars are different?, Or maybe my aftermarket struts are different?

I didn't try a nut from my DD, because I don't want to mess with the car unless I have to.



I found this info as well...

Metric Threads Explained
The size of a metric fastener (screw, bolt, etc.) is generally specified as diameter, pitch and length, all in millimeters (mm). Metric fasteners are usually classified as either coarse or fine, referring to their thread pitch, although some sizes are available in an extra fine thread. Coarse is the most common metric thread and is assumed when pitch isn't specified.

Consider this size…

M8-1.0 x 20

Here's what the description means…

M = Metric thread designation

8 = Nominal diameter, in millimeters

1.0 = Pitch (distance from thread to thread), in millimeters

20 = Length, in millimeters

Remember these tips about metric fasteners…

Diameter: the larger the number, the larger the screw or bolt

Pitch: the larger the number, the more coarse the thread (the fewer the threads per unit of measure); coarse is the most common metric thread and is assumed when pitch isn't specified

Length: the larger the number, the longer the screw or bolt

Standard: the DIN or ISO standard number describes the fastener

Dang now I'm second guessing :D my M8 x 1.25 die wouldn't thread on to a strut stud when I tried it about 2 years ago :p