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Stripped tensioner bolt - powersteering belt

flowfish

Member
:
2003 Protege5
So I was trying to change my PS/AC belt for the first time and stripped the tensioner bracket bolt right away. How do you normally get to this bolt? I was using a normal 14mm combination wrench. Do you know if this is a part that can be replaced after I get the bolt loosened? Any tips for getting it off in that tight space?

mUVyGKy.jpg
 
:
2002 Mazda Protege5
Hmm, there's these weird sockets at Lowe's by Kobalt, that purport to be able to remove stripped nuts. Haven't tried it though.
 

MaxPower

Member
:
'01 Pro ES
Try using a six-point socket with a breaker bar. If that nut isn't too badly rounded, that should work. You can get a replacement from the dealership.
 

lowlevel

Member
:
2002 Mazda Proteg 5
You can order an exact replacement nut at your local Mazda dealers parts counter... looks like part number 32-152A but get their parts guy to double check. I'de expect to pay anywhere from $3 to $12 for it.
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
Try hammering the socket on if it doesn't wanna go on easily.


There's also this stuff,...

The vise-grips grab on three sides so it's always tight.

the-originaltrade-locking-wrenches-302_zpsd7e39a11.jpg


IRBG_zps95a18e82.jpg
 

flowfish

Member
:
2003 Protege5
Just an update, the Irwin Bolt-Grip was the ticket, slipped it over the nut, cranked down on it and it loosened right up. The only problem was getting the Bolt-grip off of the nut, I had to grease it and tap it with a hammer for a bit while pulling with two Vise grips.
 
:
2002 Mazda Protege5
Just an update, the Irwin Bolt-Grip was the ticket, slipped it over the nut, cranked down on it and it loosened right up. The only problem was getting the Bolt-grip off of the nut, I had to grease it and tap it with a hammer for a bit while pulling with two Vise grips.

I had that problem when I removed a nut using a regular socket. I removed the socket from the wrench, put a big enough screwdriver in the opening of the socket so the tip doesn't pass through the nut. Then, I drop the screwdriver vertically with the handle side down from about 4 to 5 feet high onto an asphalt or concrete floor. Just drop it and let gravity take it down, don't throw it down. It may take more than one try.
 

flowfish

Member
:
2003 Protege5
Awesome. Were you able to get a replacement nut?

Not yet, I requested it from my Mazda dealer but they haven't gotten back to me yet. The nut actually had a little bit of life left so I was able to do the belt and tighten it down enough to hold for now.
 

njintau_fsd

Member
:
2003 Mazdaspeed Protege
Correct me if I'm wrong but can't you just get a replacement from Lowes or Home Depot? What's so special about that nut that you have to get it from a Dealership?
 
So I was trying to change my PS/AC belt for the first time and stripped the tensioner bracket bolt right away. How do you normally get to this bolt? I was using a normal 14mm combination wrench. Do you know if this is a part that can be replaced after I get the bolt loosened? Any tips for getting it off in that tight space?

mUVyGKy.jpg
Did the dealership ending up giving you the bolt you need? I have the same issue. I looked everywhere for the bolt but after looking at it, I swear it's a 14mm NUT that I need. I can order the bolt but all the pictures I see don't include the nut that goes on the other end. Is it part number

B366-15-966C​

 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
Any metric nut should work for you.

All the bolts and nuts on the Protégé5 are sizes 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, and 21mm, all with metric threads.
The only exception is the 19 mm oil drain plug, but that is probably so a 3/4" socket will fit on it so an oil change is possible without metric tools.

You should easily be able to find a nut at a junk yard or hardware store, just make sure that it's hardened steel.
Bring your bolt with you to find something that will thread on.
 
Any metric nut should work for you.

All the bolts and nuts on the Protégé5 are sizes 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, and 21mm, all with metric threads.
The only exception is the 19 mm oil drain plug, but that is probably so a 3/4" socket will fit on it so an oil change is possible without metric tools.

You should easily be able to find a nut at a junk yard or hardware store, just make sure that it's hardened steel.
Bring your bolt with you to find something that will thread on.
I must be doing something wrong. I went to the hardware store with my socket and their 14mm nuts are WAY bigger. None of them fit inside my socket. Is there a different between automotive nuts and bolts and the ones at tge hardware store? The only thing I can find online is the entire system with the tensioner and adjustment screw for 20 bucks
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I've found that sometimes (especially in Canada) the thread is metric, but the nut itself may be 15 or 16 mm.

It's the metric thread that counts.

If you can thread the nut on to your bolt, that's all that counts.

You just use an SAE socket or wrench to tighten it.

Make sure the nut threads on easily.

An SAE threaded nut will thread on a few rotations before it binds.

It feels right because you get it on a ways, but it's not the right thread.

Make sure it's metric threading.

The size of the nut doesn't matter.


Screenshot_20210925-181531_Unit Converter.jpg


Screenshot_20210925-181722_Unit Converter.jpg




An SAE nut is very close to the metric equivalent.

If the nut is too big, chances are that the thread is not metric, but not necessarily.

Just make sure that the nut threads on all the way easily.


I know Home Depot has a metric section and an SAE section. (At least in Canada. )
 
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I've found that sometimes (especially in Canada) the thread is metric, but the nut itself may be 15 or 16 mm.

It's the metric thread that counts.

If you can thread the nut on to your bolt, that's all that counts.

You just use an SAE socket or wrench to tighten it.

Make sure the nut threads on easily.

An SAE threaded nut will thread on a few rotations before it binds.

It feels right because you get it on a ways, but it's not the right thread.

Make sure it's metric threading.

The size of the nut doesn't matter.


View attachment 303306

View attachment 303307



An SAE nut is very close to the metric equivalent.

If the nut is too big, chances are that the thread is not metric, but not necessarily.

Just make sure that the nut threads on all the way easily.


I know Home Depot has a metric section and an SAE section. (At least in Canada. )
Thanks so much, that makes sense. I'll try home Depot and see what they have. I can't bring the bolt with me unless I take it off in the parking lot but I could just buy several. One will probably work. Either way, it's cheaper than 20 bucks plus 5 shipping to get the whole thing online. Thanks again.
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
You could replace the whole thing with SAE, or grab a metric bolt from the bin and see what nut threads on.

Normally metric is metric, and there isn't anything weird going on.
Just stay in the metric section.

That's what I did to find tiny metric bolts for my fuel filter cover for my gas tank.

Normally, there's coarse and fine thread, which should be obvious.
(threads per inch or threads per mm.)
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
Keep in mind the grade of the nut.

You probably want hardened steel which is normally a dark color.

Soft metal is usually shiny.

(Although I'd use soft metal instead of spending 20+ dollars on OEM.)

20210925_191040.jpg
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
You might be better off going to an automotive supply store (like Napa or Autozone) for a nut.

All their stuff would be proper hardness for automotive applications.

Show them your nut (or tell them it's metric 14mm), tell them what its for, and they should have something.
 
:
2x 2001 SP20 323's
Also important, the head hex size might be 14mm but the bolt is most likely M10 and will be classified as such :D that'll be the 14mm nuts in the store were way to big

10mm hexes are usually M6
12-13mm are usually M8
16-17mm are usually M10 apart from fine threads and flange bolts which have a 14mm head
19mm are usually M12

That particular nut is probably M10 fine thread

Most if not all the threads on the Pro5 are metric fine threads, some are extra fine like the top studs on the front struts

Good luck!
 
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