LED Headlight housing appearance issue

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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
Has anyone experienced having issues inside the LED headlight housing that appears as cloudy-murky spots? Looks like dried up water-humidity within the housing lens. I’ve never experienced this in any of my other 3 Mazda vehicles until now (appear in both front headlights). See photos:
This is from a 2019 Mazda 3 GT
 

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sm1ke

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I don't recall seeing this on any of the newer Mazda3s locally, but I have seen this issue on many other different makes and models of vehicles. One of my 1999 Accord's headlights developed a similar issue after I did a projector retrofit - I think it was due to me not sealing the headlight properly during reassembly. I doubt this is the case for your car, but in the past I simply epoxied some of those silica gel packets you find in shoeboxes near any vents on the back of the headlight housing to help absorb moisture. I'd also check those vents to see if they somehow got plugged or clogged. I don't know what the backs of the Mazda3's headlight housings look like, so not sure if this would apply, but it's something to check. Hopefully you can get it figured out.
 
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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
I don't recall seeing this on any of the newer Mazda3s locally, but I have seen this issue on many other different makes and models of vehicles. One of my 1999 Accord's headlights developed a similar issue after I did a projector retrofit - I think it was due to me not sealing the headlight properly during reassembly. I doubt this is the case for your car, but in the past I simply epoxied some of those silica gel packets you find in shoeboxes near any vents on the back of the headlight housing to help absorb moisture. I'd also check those vents to see if they somehow got plugged or clogged. I don't know what the backs of the Mazda3's headlight housings look like, so not sure if this would apply, but it's something to check. Hopefully you can get it figured out.
Yeah will be taking it to dealer for them to look at and rectify as I think this is a warranty issue...shouldn’t be happening to a newer vehicle!
 

sm1ke

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Yeah will be taking it to dealer for them to look at and rectify as I think this is a warranty issue...shouldn’t be happening to a newer vehicle!

Please keep us posted on what they say. Hopefully they're able to resolve it and explain why it's happening and how to fix it.
 
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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
Please keep us posted on what they say. Hopefully they're able to resolve it and explain why it's happening and how to fix it.
According to the dealership, these new headlight housing designs implemented by Mazda on the 2019 MY’s and newer are now the “vented” type therefore condensation is considered as “normal” and they’re starting to see them as well in other Mazda 3s in their lot. The previous design was the “sealed” type but had a few issues with water pooling internally at bottom of the housing that’s why Mazda went to the vented design. Not particularly pleased about them but looks like nothing can be done and won’t be considered as a warranty claim. They’re not that bad in appearance and only noticeable when you look closely at the headlights but disappointed that Mazda went to the vented design and won’t cover them under warranty. Oh well....
 
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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
Here’s a TSB from Mazda North America issued in March of 2019 that helps explain the condensation issue found in certain models including the 2019 Mazda 3. It will help determine if issue is claimable under warranty or not.
 

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sm1ke

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According to the dealership, these new headlight housing designs implemented by Mazda on the 2019 MY’s and newer are now the “vented” type therefore condensation is considered as “normal” and they’re starting to see them as well in other Mazda 3s in their lot. The previous design was the “sealed” type but had a few issues with water pooling internally at bottom of the housing that’s why Mazda went to the vented design. Not particularly pleased about them but looks like nothing can be done and won’t be considered as a warranty claim. They’re not that bad in appearance and only noticeable when you look closely at the headlights but disappointed that Mazda went to the vented design and won’t cover them under warranty. Oh well....

Ah I see. Strange that they went to a vented design instead of incorporating a drain in the bottom of the headlight to prevent pooling... there must be some reason for that. I've seen online that some people just put silica packets inside the housing, but this wouldn't be possible if your car has LED headlights, and you'd have to be happy with seeing silica packets in your headlights (which I wouldn't like).

Apparently, if it's cold outside, and you turn the lights on right after startup, the inside of the housing can warm up too quickly and create condensation on the inside. Seems to be more common with halogen headlights, but LEDs still generate heat, so it can happen to those too. Anyway, it seems that you can dry them out by using a hair dryer to blow hot, dry air into the headlight housing via the vents. I'd give that a shot if the vents are accessible - otherwise you might have to wait until it warms up for the condensation to go away on it's own.
 

sm1ke

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Ah I see. Strange that they went to a vented design instead of incorporating a drain in the bottom of the headlight to prevent pooling... there must be some reason for that. I've seen online that some people just put silica packets inside the housing, but this wouldn't be possible if your car has LED headlights, and you'd have to be happy with seeing silica packets in your headlights (which I wouldn't like).

Apparently, if it's cold outside, and you turn the lights on right after startup, the inside of the housing can warm up too quickly and create condensation on the inside. Seems to be more common with halogen headlights, but LEDs still generate heat, so it can happen to those too. Anyway, it seems that you can dry them out by using a hair dryer to blow hot, dry air into the headlight housing via the vents. I'd give that a shot if the vents are accessible - otherwise you might have to wait until it warms up for the condensation to go away on it's own.

You could also switch to LED corner lamps to reduce the amount of heat in the area where condensation develops. Looks like the full-LED housings do not have this issue.
 
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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
Ah I see. Strange that they went to a vented design instead of incorporating a drain in the bottom of the headlight to prevent pooling... there must be some reason for that. I've seen online that some people just put silica packets inside the housing, but this wouldn't be possible if your car has LED headlights, and you'd have to be happy with seeing silica packets in your headlights (which I wouldn't like).

Apparently, if it's cold outside, and you turn the lights on right after startup, the inside of the housing can warm up too quickly and create condensation on the inside. Seems to be more common with halogen headlights, but LEDs still generate heat, so it can happen to those too. Anyway, it seems that you can dry them out by using a hair dryer to blow hot, dry air into the headlight housing via the vents. I'd give that a shot if the vents are accessible - otherwise you might have to wait until it warms up for the condensation to go away on it's own.
Was tempted to do this (using a blow dry) but figured that the fogging looks like it’s dried up and has been there for a long while hence blow drying won’t fix the issue. Looks like I’m out of luck on this one and should just not pay much attention to it so as not to ruin my like for the car...haggling and fighting with dealers usually don’t go well so I’ll just have to charge this to experience!