CX-5 vs CX-50 suspension

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
When it comes to a CX-5 vs. CX-30 comparison, the proof is in the pudding. However, a personal comparison in test drives at a dealer are not going to be possible. Maybe ripping one turn before the salesman freaks, lol.

Lol, prior to my first test drive in my CX-9, I would have agreed with you. In my case, during my first visit to a Mazda dealership, I asked for a test drive. I had never driven or been inside a Mazda before, which I mentioned to the salesman. He asked me if it would be alright if he drove first, to give me an idea of what to expect. I thought it was odd, but whatever. He pushed that CX-9 through corners and traffic circles like it was nothing. The complete opposite of what most people would expect, it was a hoot.

Only way to know for sure is to go for a test drive and try it, haha.
 
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Phoenix
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2021 signature
Manufacturers are meeting this faux tough-look demand by adding chunky black plastic, fake silver plastic "skid plates", aggressive fascias, ect. They just need to look tough (not actually function) because consumers only care about having a rugged appearance/persona.
I'll counter this. I like the sleek, more luxurious look of the body matching wheel arches and front and rocker areas of the 2022 Signature but probably prefer the black plastic that's now on my 2020 as I see those as high wear areas. But, I may be the odd one though as I also prefer the look of our CX-5's vs the current RDX which, everyday, looks more and more common in shape
 
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HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
Lol, prior to my first test drive in my CX-9, I would have agreed with you. In my case, during my first visit to a Mazda dealership, I asked for a test drive. I had never driven or been inside a Mazda before, which I mentioned to the salesman. He asked me if it would be alright if he drove first, to give me an idea of what to expect. I thought it was odd, but whatever. He pushed that CX-9 through corners and traffic circles like it was nothing. The complete opposite of what most people would expect, it was a hoot.

Only way to know for sure is to go for a test drive and try it, haha.
I would think most shoppers will not be so privileged. Regardless, having somebody else do it is not quite the same but better than nothing.

Many years ago I test drove an Avalon, tooling around in the normal fashion. I told the salesman that I was about to test the handling, then ripped through a left turn as close to a four wheel drift as traction/stability control would allow without going totally nuts. I didn't buy the car but it impressed for being a large comfort mobile. But I digress.

The salesman let out a gasp. My wife was in the car and she didn't like it. I figured that was the end of the test, lol.
 

bluegrass

Banned
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SUV
I just don't believe people are buying SUV's... to project an image.
A... 4Runner? Not so much.
I don't believe this is what someone thinks when they are buying a 4Runner.
Yea, I don't buy this either. When someone in Cleveland, Ohio buys an AWD SUV... it's to get of of the driveway without issue. Or to make the 40 mile commute downtown during a blizzard. Most people aren't all "well, I could take this down the back roads if I wanted to!
Sorry to break it to you, but you're wrong on this issue...many consumers absolutely buy certain SUVs to project an image.

Have you not noticed a proliferation in SUVs projecting a wannabe 'off-road' persona? Even the new CX-50 has the fake skid plates you dislike. Why do you think Mazda added fake skid plates...to project an image!

Advertising for these SUVs also emphasizes off-road usage (blazing down dirt roads and crawling over rocks) even though 99% of consumers will never leave the pavement. Why do you think the new CX-50 ads/pictures show it as an off-roader...to project an image!

Vehicles like the 4Runner and Wranger are expensive ($50K+), outdated, gas hogs, and bad daily drivers. Since they aren't taking these vehicles off-road, why would consumers choose them over much better alternatives...to project an image!

Here's an article from ABC News...
https://abcnews.go.com/Business/car...-americans-off-roading-suvs/story?id=74138437
In reality, a tiny percentage of SUV owners actually go off-roading, according to Karl Brauer, executive analyst at iSeeCars.com.
"Consumers who buy these vehicles love the 'what if' idea," he told ABC News. "That alone will get them to buy these vehicles. Consumers want flexibility and confidence. But few will make that leap from mall parking lot to off-roading adventuring."
 
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RDX Aspec Adv.
People buy 4 runners because of residential value, and they last forever. Proven through and through.

Ford tried to sell the SRA setup on the 2005 mustang when everyone knew irs was better, with similar wording as Mazda is using. They finally corrected it in 2015 models, and the car handles wayyyyy better, now.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
People buy stuff because it's in style. Paint manufacturers and interior designers say green is this year's fashion and people go to Home Depot and buy green paint. Next year it will be something else. SUVs (along with pickups) are clearly the preferred style among the masses. Does anybody want to parse the difference between "style" and "image"?

How about all those pickups? You think those people are all contractors? I've got neighbors with quad cabs who pay people to mow their lawn and clear their snow and just about everything else. I wonder if they know which end of a hammer to hold, lol.

That's not everybody, of course. Some, like myself, went from a mid-sized sedan to a compact SUV for practical reasons, chiefly ride height. After two knee replacements, the wife needed a higher get-in. Among many older folks, step in height is a big consideration. Also with more and more SUVs and pickups on the road, visibility in a sedan has become increasingly problematic--the more ride height the better. Then there's the better cargo capacity when popping the rear seats down for a road trip. I'm sure I'm not alone in these considerations.

If style was not a consideration, Highlanders would not have historically outsold Siennas by a wide margin. Designating minivans "mommy wagons" while ignoring their superior utility over a 3-row SUV at a lower price point while comparably equipped with comparable performance, is about all you need to know on the subject. It's a little different now with the hybrid-only Sienna and the narrower price spread with Highlander, but that's neither here not there.
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
Hmm, two things that I'd appreciate as upgrades to my CX-5 would be a bigger towing capacity, and larger and more convenient cargo - without a much larger vehicle to crowd my garage space, or maneuver and park. I'm not really interested in something as big as a CX-9.

I'm generally very satisfied with my 2018 GT, and would probably appreciate better mileage more than it being faster. It will be interesting to see how Mazda's models shake out over the next few years. This CX-5 has set a high bar as far as I'm concerned, and ticks a lot of boxes. Driving it makes me happy.

As far as the rear suspension, if its a wash - or even close - in handling, but allows better reliability or better cargo design, I'm game. I believe in Mazda's driver experience oriented design approach and trust them to make good decisions.

I don't see them positioning this as more expensive than the CX-5 while taking serious liberties purely to save production costs. (I'm talking engineering - the small spare tire in the CX-5 is inexcusable but surely not an engineering decisions).
 
The space savings from the rear suspension may have help with the ground clearance. It certainly help with more storage room.

2023-Mazda-CX-50-23.jpg
Yep, one of the major dislikes of my 2019 cx5. It’s not often needed for me, but when it is its kind of important .I know it handles better, but it is a SUV. If I need to carve up roads my 20 year old vette fills that need. It’s then I miss my old CRV. Not often though. Heck I hate having to remove the rear seat headrest less than lack of storage space. No car is perfect. Love my CX 5 mostly.
 
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2022 CX-5 Turbo
On rear suspension.
Moose Test:
See for yourself.
CX30 (max=74km/h)
CX5 (max=78km/h)


This is from autoblog.
"Finally, we come to the rear suspension. We were surprised to see the Mazda3 abandon a multi-link rear suspension in favor of a torsion-beam rear end. Torsion beam suspensions are generally considered less capable and refined since it ties both wheels together. Sometimes it's used because it's cheap to develop, or because it's easy to package. Everyone we spoke to at Mazda said that this design wasn't chosen for those reasons, but rather because they were able to make the car ride and handle better. The company found that the design offered more natural reactions to bumps for the passengers inside, and the company was able to really dial in every single part since it was a simpler suspension with fewer variables to worry about. For example, one of Mazda's engineers mentioned that each side of the multi-link suspension had 10 bushings to mess with, and the torsion-beam setup has just one on each side for the trailing arms."
 
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Phoenix
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2021 signature
faux skid plates, cladding, SUV stance; One could put those in the same category as wings, diffusers, pushbars, "fog" lights. We've all put useless crap on our cars as one time or another to project an image - I'm embarrassed at some of the things I did decades ago. I kind of give a pass at most grocery store mom's. If I still had 2 or 3 kids with lots of hauling of all their gear I'd choose a Highlander over the Sienna also. It's not always about practicality.
 
The black plastic cladding will probably engulf the car completely in a few years.

View attachment 304791
It really entertaining to know that used these things are almost cult classics. People absolutely fell in love with how useful they are even though they are ugly as all hell.
Sorry to break it to you, but you're wrong on this issue...many consumers absolutely buy certain SUVs to project an image.

Have you not noticed a proliferation in SUVs projecting a wannabe 'off-road' persona? Even the new CX-50 has the fake skid plates you dislike. Why do you think Mazda added fake skid plates...to project an image!

Advertising for these SUVs also emphasizes off-road usage (blazing down dirt roads and crawling over rocks) even though 99% of consumers will never leave the pavement. Why do you think the new CX-50 ads/pictures show it as an off-roader...to project an image!

Vehicles like the 4Runner and Wranger are expensive ($50K+), outdated, gas hogs, and bad daily drivers. Since they aren't taking these vehicles off-road, why would consumers choose them over much better alternatives...to project an image!

Here's an article from ABC News...
https://abcnews.go.com/Business/car...-americans-off-roading-suvs/story?id=74138437
In reality, a tiny percentage of SUV owners actually go off-roading, according to Karl Brauer, executive analyst at iSeeCars.com.
"Consumers who buy these vehicles love the 'what if' idea," he told ABC News. "That alone will get them to buy these vehicles. Consumers want flexibility and confidence. But few will make that leap from mall parking lot to off-roading adventuring."
This is so true. If consumers actually bought cars that were more useful to them, people would be buying far more minivans. They are awesome and far more useful than SUV's for the average family.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
Everyone: « The new cars have too much cladding! ».

Honda: « Hold my beer… »


2006_honda_element_4dr-suv_ex_fq_oem_1_500.jpg


😆
I love Honda Element! Unfortunately by the time I needed a new car Honda was no longer selling it ⋯
 
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'20 CX-5 GT PP AWD
Have you test driven a new Mazda3/CX-30 and compared the ride over an imperfect road to your CX-5? I haven't had the chance yet. It seems that quite a few auto journalists (blogs, YouTube channels, etc.) have commented that the ride is either unchanged or slightly better. I have seen one article that actually said the ride was worse in the new Mazda3 compared to the previous model. Of course, all of these sources have someone in their pockets, so I always take what I read and hear with a grain of salt.

IMO the primary reason for the switch is indeed cost-cutting, and a distant second would be packaging/cargo room improvement.
As it happens I have a 2020 CX-5 and the wife has a 2021 CX-30. Both are NA AWD. I've never taken either one on a really rugged trail or anything but the streets here in Chicago ain't for sissies either. Her CX-30 maybe doesn't feel quite as isolated from the bumps as my car but it certainly isn't uncomfortable or anything. I actually like her car better sometimes just because it's smaller, quicker and easier to zip around in in city traffic.

But whenever I drive it I think how how much fun the 30 would be with the turbo and a 6 speed manual. It would make a hella large scale pocket rocket.
 
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North of Toronto
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2019 CX-9 Sig
However, a personal comparison in test drives at a dealer are not going to be possible. Maybe ripping one turn before the salesman freaks, lol.

Few yrs back, was considering a Mazda 6 but was unsure. Before second test drive, warned him I'm having doubts specifically around cornering and needed to push it to be sure. He had no problem, unfortunately needed to sit in back as my wife was with me.

I pushed it hard, he very nicely sat in silence. Not the best seat for such a drive.

Back at dealer, we all get out, he gives me a look and mutters something to the effect of "You weren't kidding", then took a walk around lot to get his colour back. I appreciated him for biting his tongue during the drive.
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
Everyone: « The new cars have too much cladding! ».

Honda: « Hold my beer… »


2006_honda_element_4dr-suv_ex_fq_oem_1_500.jpg


😆
That was my wife's last car, and she loved it too. Seems like Honda has an opportunity there.

the interior was very flexible, if a little cheap and clunky. Very easy to clean and held a lot of stuff. Did not drive at all like a Mazda unfortunately.

She's waiting for the Volkwagon ID Buzz now, and has been for a few years now. She's still driving my 2000 Acura 3.2TL I'd thought I'd finally be able stop having to keep running.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
Few yrs back, was considering a Mazda 6 but was unsure. Before second test drive, warned him I'm having doubts specifically around cornering and needed to push it to be sure. He had no problem, unfortunately needed to sit in back as my wife was with me.

I pushed it hard, he very nicely sat in silence. Not the best seat for such a drive.
o
Back at dealer, we all get out, he gives me a look and mutters something to the effect of "You weren't kidding", then took a walk around lot to get his colour back. I appreciated him for biting his tongue during the drive.
You know, I vaguely recall now a salesman who just handed me the keys, didn't ride along. Can't recall what car that was. You could get lucky that way, lol.
 
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RDX Aspec Adv.
lmao, you want to see REAL cost cutting? Bruh...this is the interior switching of my $44,495 MSRP Rav4 Prime...the only switch that illuminates is the window switch. Not the "overhead light switch". Not the door locks. Not the other 3 windows on that panel...just driver's window, and the "SOS" button. It's a legit pain at night.

(But yes it has real IRS, AWD, a killer eCVT and seamless regen braking and all that, as well as legit seats that remind me of Recaros, but yeah...)