Anyone install a CX-5 cold air intake?

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2010 CX-9 GT
There are tests out there that show more contamination of the oil when a "high flow" air filter is used. This makes sense as the filters tend to be less efficient at removing very fine particles from the air, which end up sneaking past the piston rings and get into the oil. However, most of these tests I've seen were done on large diesel engines, which pull a tremendous amount of air through the intake system, so the degree to which a passenger car is impacted by this is debatable. If you change your oil more frequently, this is likely moot.

The other issue with these filters and intakes is that it is unclear how much of the horsepower gain is due to reductions in flow restriction vs. alteration of the MAF signal. A small alteration of the MAF signal can cause the engine to run leaner, which will cause an increase in horsepower. Again, a 1 or 2% increase in engine output is not likely to cause any harm, but these filters and intakes are a favorite scapegoat of dealer service departments. If you install one and ever have check engine lights or other issues, you need to make sure you have a "mod friendly" dealer, or remove it prior to taking it in for service.
 

AVC

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'17 CX-5 Select
If you have a cheap BT scan tool (using Torque), and graph the MAP, you can easily see the net restriction of the entire intake system; air filter + carbon filter (2017 and newer have these) + twists and turns of the intake plumbing. Note your ambient air pressure at key ON, engine OFF, then do a WOT test. For my '17, the MAP reads from 93 to 97 kPa. My key ON, engine OFF was 99kPa (aka zero restriction). You can remove the air filter and do another run. Then remove the carbon filter and do another run. Witha little math, you'll know what the air filter and carbon filter contribute to restriction. You could do the same test with aftermarket intake plumbing/filters. No guessing or a**dyno calibration needed.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
If you have a cheap BT scan tool (using Torque), and graph the MAP, you can easily see the net restriction of the entire intake system; air filter + carbon filter (2017 and newer have these) + twists and turns of the intake plumbing. Note your ambient air pressure at key ON, engine OFF, then do a WOT test. For my '17, the MAP reads from 93 to 97 kPa. My key ON, engine OFF was 99kPa (aka zero restriction). You can remove the air filter and do another run. Then remove the carbon filter and do another run. Witha little math, you'll know what the air filter and carbon filter contribute to restriction. You could do the same test with aftermarket intake plumbing/filters. No guessing or a**dyno calibration needed.

2017+ CX-5s have a separate carbon air filter? I've taken apart my 2018 CX-9's intake system a couple of times and there's no carbon filter anywhere. It also isn't listed as a part here:

 

AVC

:
'17 CX-5 Select
2017+ CX-5s have a separate carbon air filter? I've taken apart my 2018 CX-9's intake system a couple of times and there's no carbon filter anywhere.

Yes, at least on '17, on the underside of the air cleaner box cover. I doubt you can order it as a separate part.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
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Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Yes, at least on '17, on the underside of the air cleaner box cover. I doubt you can order it as a separate part.

My mistake, you're right.

carbon.JPG


Googling the P/N for the air cleaner cover turned up that picture, which (like the Crosstrek) shows a non-replaceable carbon filter. You'd have to replace the $60 cover to get a new charcoal filter (if you wanted a new charcoal filter). I didn't notice it on my car but I probably just missed it. I guess that's one more layer of restriction that is removed during an aftermarket air intake installation.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
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Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Hm, the 2.5T's air cleaner cover doesn't appear to have the carbon filter. It would explain the price difference between the two parts (turbo cover is only $30).

2.5 NA: PY01-13-3AX
2.5 Turbo: PY8W-13-3AX
 

AVC

:
'17 CX-5 Select
Just to clarify; besides the presence or absence of carbon filter, the NA and Turbo covers aren't otherwise identical, as the plumbing and air path differs between the two engines. Maybe some upstream tweaking to reduce turbulence with the extra 90 degree bend.
 

AVC

:
'17 CX-5 Select
That carbon filter is also part of the acoustic (noise) mitigation design. If you remove it more induction noise will make it into the engine bay and into cabin. Some may like this.
 
:
2010 CX-9 GT
If you have a cheap BT scan tool (using Torque), and graph the MAP, you can easily see the net restriction of the entire intake system; air filter + carbon filter (2017 and newer have these) + twists and turns of the intake plumbing. Note your ambient air pressure at key ON, engine OFF, then do a WOT test. For my '17, the MAP reads from 93 to 97 kPa. My key ON, engine OFF was 99kPa (aka zero restriction). You can remove the air filter and do another run. Then remove the carbon filter and do another run. Witha little math, you'll know what the air filter and carbon filter contribute to restriction. You could do the same test with aftermarket intake plumbing/filters. No guessing or a**dyno calibration needed.

So there's a 6 kPa pressure drop, max, due to the presence of the entire intake system and filter. This is ~6%, which places an upper bound on the most horsepower you could hope to gain with one of these systems. In reality, it will be less because the new intake doesn't remove all the restrictions, so the 2-3% increase is plausible.
 
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