When will replacement be needed and about how much (tires and brakes)?

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2018 CX-5 Touring AWD
I have a three-year-old CX-5 Touring. My car is serviced at the dealer. All these times I've brought it in for service I've been told the car is fine and nothing needs to be changed or serviced. The change all the fluids (oil, coolant, windshield, etc) and I'm on my way. This past January (2021), when my car turned three, I was told that there is some wear in the tires and the brake pads but that there was no need to change them then. However, that left me thinking that I might have to spend some money on these things and that it's not going to be cheap, I know that tires are not cheap, not sure about breaks. So my guess is that by the time I bring my car in for service again in July of this year, my car will be just shy of 30K miles (about 29,250 miles if my guess is right). Is there a way to predict when they will need to be changed? And when that happens, is there a way to have an idea how much I will have to pay? I checked the tires and the ones I was thinking about would cost me around $1K out the door but I don't know the first thing about brakes.

Thanks.
 

CarpeDiem

Under Pressure
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Superstitions
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2021 Carbon T
Tires should be replaced when the tread depth is less than 1/8” - by the time all the tread wear bars are showing it is slightly past due. As for the brakes, so much depends on how you drive (brake late and hard), the type if driving you do (freeway versus stop and go), and the miles you put in the vehicle that it is impossible to predict when they will need to be replaced. I had a pickup which lasted over 75,000 miles before it needed new brakes - mostly freeway miles. As for cost, the dealer will be the most costly, but they should use OEM parts. Independent tire or brake shops may cost less and you may be able to choose higher quality brake pads and discs.
 
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2018 CX-5 Touring AWD
Tires should be replaced when the tread depth is less than 1/8” - by the time all the tread wear bars are showing it is slightly past due. As for the brakes, so much depends on how you drive (brake late and hard), the type if driving you do (freeway versus stop and go), and the miles you put in the vehicle that it is impossible to predict when they will need to be replaced. I had a pickup which lasted over 75,000 miles before it needed new brakes - mostly freeway miles. As for cost, the dealer will be the most costly, but they should use OEM parts. Independent tire or brake shops may cost less and you may be able to choose higher quality brake pads and discs.
So, as of January 2021, this is how they (the dealer) marked the tires:

LF & RF >6/32"
LR & RR 4/32" - 6/32

And the brakes:

LF & RF 50%
LR & RR 20% - 50%

Are you saying that my best option for brakes is NOT with the dealer? Do not get OEM parts because others are of higher quality?

As for tires, after reading a little about it, Michellin is winning the race.

Thanks for your response.
 
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South Carolina
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12 MZ5 13 CX-5
I only use OEM pads and rotors, but I change them myself. Figure $450-ish for pads, rotors, and hardware. Then any mechanic (or you!) can install them, saving a bunch of money in labor.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I have a three-year-old CX-5 Touring. My car is serviced at the dealer. All these times I've brought it in for service I've been told the car is fine and nothing needs to be changed or serviced. The change all the fluids (oil, coolant, windshield, etc) and I'm on my way. This past January (2021), when my car turned three, I was told that there is some wear in the tires and the brake pads but that there was no need to change them then. However, that left me thinking that I might have to spend some money on these things and that it's not going to be cheap, I know that tires are not cheap, not sure about breaks. So my guess is that by the time I bring my car in for service again in July of this year, my car will be just shy of 30K miles (about 29,250 miles if my guess is right). Is there a way to predict when they will need to be changed? And when that happens, is there a way to have an idea how much I will have to pay? I checked the tires and the ones I was thinking about would cost me around $1K out the door but I don't know the first thing about brakes.

Thanks.
You have a 2018 CX-5 Touring (FWD? AWD?), and you have 225/55R19 GT wheels and tires which is the only MY on CX-5 which has 19” wheels on Touring. With 29,250 miles, your next big-ticket expense should be tires (~ $1,000). With 4/32" ~ 6/32” (apparently tire rotation hasn’t been done regularly) on tread depth from your dealer’s report, your Toyo A36 with “300 A A” UTQG should have some miles left if your driving demand on road condition is not critical. Many consider changing tires at 4/32“ tread depth, but legally most States use 2/32” when the wear bar on tire tread showed. Check the following treads for your tire selections:

225/55R19 Tire Comparison Table for CX-5 GT - Many to Choose From

Tire Recommendations?

Continental CrossContact LX25 vs Michelin CrossClimate SUV (17 inch)?

Continental Crosscontact LX25 Tires

Best All-Season Michelin 225/55R19 Tires

You definitely don’t want to go to your Mazda dealer for tire replacement. Depending on your location, I highly recommend a local Discount Tire / America’s Tire for a set of new tires with many benefits:

Stock Tire Life

Speaking about your brakes, usually you’d need rear brakes first depending on your driving habit. The dealer says your CX-5 has about 50% brake pad life left at the front, and 20% ~ 50% left at the rear. You can try some reputable independent brake shops such as Brakes Plus® having a second opinion on RR brake which has only 20% left. The dealer will use OEM brake pads which I prefer, but make sure to use non-Value-Products (bette) OEM pads as there’re 2 different lines of OEM maintenance parts.

You can consider to drain-and-fill the ATF for your automatic transmission around 50K or 60K miles. If you have an AWD, consider to change the gear lube in front transfer case and rear differential.

Finally, if your Mazda dealer has changed the coolant on your CX-5 which is not supposed to until 120K miles or 10 years, your Mazda dealer isn’t trustworthy.

As for the cost, the best way is to get a quote for a job in your area as the price difference sometimes is substantial between, say, California and Texas.
 
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16.5 CX-5 Tour/AWD
I have a three-year-old CX-5 Touring. My car is serviced at the dealer. All these times I've brought it in for service I've been told the car is fine and nothing needs to be changed or serviced. The change all the fluids (oil, coolant, windshield, etc) and I'm on my way. This past January (2021), when my car turned three, I was told that there is some wear in the tires and the brake pads but that there was no need to change them then. However, that left me thinking that I might have to spend some money on these things and that it's not going to be cheap, I know that tires are not cheap, not sure about breaks. So my guess is that by the time I bring my car in for service again in July of this year, my car will be just shy of 30K miles (about 29,250 miles if my guess is right). Is there a way to predict when they will need to be changed? And when that happens, is there a way to have an idea how much I will have to pay? I checked the tires and the ones I was thinking about would cost me around $1K out the door but I don't know the first thing about brakes.

Thanks.

Hey there, I have some tips that might help you:
Typically, a dealer charges between $400 - 650 for the front or rear brakes (parts + labor) but that really depends. If you buy your own parts (rotors/brake pads/lubricant/tools/hardware) it might cost you a bit more upfront. If you're interested, I wrote a guide on how to replace brakes and it might help you.

https://www.mazdas247.com/forum/ind...replacement-one-person-brake-bleed-guide.116/
 
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2018 CX-5 Touring AWD
You have a 2018 CX-5 Touring (FWD? AWD?), and you have 225/55R19 GT wheels and tires which is the only MY on CX-5 which has 19” wheels on Touring.
AWD, 19".

On the brakes, is it better to change them all at once or not? I'm thinking that I will have the brakes done by the dealer when the time comes. I've been looking around at tires, trying to figure out which ones are best for me.

I'm setting aside $2K for both the brakes and the tires, that should be plenty.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
AWD, 19".

On the brakes, is it better to change them all at once or not? I'm thinking that I will have the brakes done by the dealer when the time comes. I've been looking around at tires, trying to figure out which ones are best for me.

I'm setting aside $2K for both the brakes and the tires, that should be plenty.
On CX-5 usually the rear brakes are wearing out first, at 40K ~ 60K miles. The front brakes should last a lot longer, 75K ~100K miles. Of course those estimates depend on your driving habit. You can replace the rear brakes when the pad thickness is down to 20% ~ 10%, then the front brakes later. Since the brake at LR is down to 20%, you should keep an eyes on it, check it by yourself or by an independent brake shop. $2,000 is a good amount for BOTH front and rear brake jobs by a Mazda dealer, and a set of good tires from Discount Tire Store.

Again, if your Mazda dealer changed the engine coolant prematurely, I’ll find another reputable Mazda dealer for the brake job.
 
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South Carolina
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12 MZ5 13 CX-5
You can do one axle at a time, no problem. Fact is, rear brakes more often than not the rears will last 2-3x as long as the fronts.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
You can do one axle at a time, no problem. Fact is, rear brakes more often than not the rears will last 2-3x as long as the fronts.
That is definitely not the case anymore with newer vehicles. Old wives tale.
The rears almost always go first. This has been the case with every car I've owned with four wheel disc brakes.
Part of the reason is that modern cars have a rear brake bias on initial application. The rears grab first.
This is engineered into the vehicle to minimize the front end dropping/dipping when hitting the brakes.
As for the other question, you don't have to do all four wheel at the same time.
You can do the fronts and rears at different times.
 
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2018 CX-5 Touring AWD
Again, if your Mazda dealer changed the engine coolant prematurely, I’ll find another reputable Mazda dealer for the brake job.
I don't understand this? Why are you saying this? Nothing has been changed on my car until this past issue I had with the radiator and that's all it's ever been replaced. No engine has been replaced, just the radiator.
 
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South Carolina
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12 MZ5 13 CX-5
I had 230,000 miles on the rear brakes of my Honda CR-V when I sold it. They were still fine.

I didn't change the rear brakes on my MZ3 until they hit 160,000.

Brakes are a thing that completely depend on how you drive. If you drive all highway like I do, they'll last forever. If you drive inner city stop and go like a taxi does, you'll be lucky to get 20,000 out of a set. If you have a Miata that you flog at at Road Atlanta on Saturdays, you'll be doing great to get a weekend out of them.
 
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2018 CX-5 Touring AWD
Brakes are a thing that completely depend on how you drive. If you drive all highway like I do, they'll last forever. If you drive inner city stop and go like a taxi does, you'll be lucky to get 20,000 out of a set. If you have a Miata that you flog at at Road Atlanta on Saturdays, you'll be doing great to get a weekend out of them.
It's a combination of freeway and street driving. My commute to and from work takes me around 10 minutes (without or light traffic), it's under 5 miles. But I'd say it's mostly street driving.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I don't understand this? Why are you saying this? Nothing has been changed on my car until this past issue I had with the radiator and that's all it's ever been replaced. No engine has been replaced, just the radiator.
Mentioned in my previous post #5. The first engine coolant change interval for CX-5 is 120K miles or 10 years, but you said your Mazda dealer had already changed it:
I have a three-year-old CX-5 Touring. My car is serviced at the dealer. All these times I've brought it in for service I've been told the car is fine and nothing needs to be changed or serviced. The change all the fluids (oil, coolant, windshield, etc) and I'm on my way.