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Circles/squares on your Mazda are not for towing or pulling onto flatbed

:
2018 CX-5 Sport
As per this video, the narrator explains that the 'tow bar' access areas through the bumpers are not to be used. Ever. They were used for securing the cars while transporting them to the USA.

 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
"Hi I'm Jay Hatch, sales and leasing consultant...." oh boy I am listening to an expert now. /sarcasm
I can't wait for this discussion... again.
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
That thing in the middle just keeps spinning around...I can't get it to play.
 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
That thing in the middle just keeps spinning around...I can't get it to play.

Depending on your platform or browser combo it might not like embedded YouTube video
try a link copy/paste into a seperate browser window

https:// www.youtube.com/ watch?v=23-voe33x90
notice i added spaces so the forum doesn't auto translate it into embedded video - remove those.

or search on youtube:

"
The circles/squares on your Mazda are NOT for towing! Important for every Mazda owner to know!
"

or
use the channel link:
 
:
2016.5 CX-5 GT AWD titanium/black 2016 Miata Club ST MT white
"The circles/squares on your Mazda are NOT for towing! Important for every Mazda owner to know!"

All this technical language! lol

""Hi I'm Jay Hatch, sales and leasing consultant...." oh boy I am listening to an expert now."

Exactly. One would think that the 'expert' could pop one of those circles/squares out and show us laymen/laywomen what was underneath eh? Maybe even screw a eyelet into place?

Even better, if those circles/squares are not meant for towing/recovery how about showing us the correct way to tow/recover a CX-5?
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
I towed my cx5 on a U-haul trailer and I had to crawl under there and wrap this chain around the rear suspension. I don't think I did anything on the front except these hold down things around the tires.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Lol. 🤷‍♂️


I mean, the narrator is right, those circles/squares are not to be used for towing. Those circles and squares are just covers for the tow/recovery access points. Maybe he knows his stuff after all ;)
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
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Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
It's probably good practice to specify that the tow/recovery access points are only meant for emergency use - meaning to pull the car out of a ditch/snow bank, or to load the car onto a flat bed. They are not meant to be used to tow in the conventional sense (meaning you shouldn't pull the CX-5 behind you using the eyelet, and you shouldn't pull anything with the CX-5 using the eyelets on the back).

Incorrect:
img00266-20140901-1856-jpg.2345
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
Please stop calling them "tow/recovery access points." They are not meant for pulling a vehicle out of a ditch, or anything similar. It's right in the manual:

"Do not use the front and rear tiedown eyelets for towing the vehicle. They have been designed only for securing the vehicle to a transport vessel during shipping. Using the eyelets for any other purpose could result in the vehicle being damaged"

And no, they are not being cute with the language by implying that there separate tiedown eyelets and towing/recover eyelets. It is where the eyelets screw into that is the weak point for towing. A real tow truck will use straps or chains to attach to the axle of the vehicle in a recovery situation
 
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16 CX-5 Tour'ngAWD
As per this video, the narrator explains that the 'tow bar' access areas through the bumpers are not to be used. Ever. They were used for securing the cars while transporting them to the USA.

My dealer was kind enough to remove the long and short eye hooks that have a place in the spare tire foam surround in our 2016. When I asked about the missing pieces, our sales consultant said pretty much the same thing; the hooks are used for transport only and they are removed so owners don't get the wrong impression and bend/break stuff thinking they are meant for pulling out of/extraction from a stuck position.

So, my CX-5's spare tire well surround has too empty cutouts...oh well. I don't look back there anyway and if they aren't any use to me, I see it as weight reduction (every gram helps).

So, are theses hooks recycled or sent back to the factory to help the next crop of CX-5 (or any Mazda) during transport?
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Please stop calling them "tow/recovery access points." They are not meant for pulling a vehicle out of a ditch, or anything similar. It's right in the manual:

"Do not use the front and rear tiedown eyelets for towing the vehicle. They have been designed only for securing the vehicle to a transport vessel during shipping. Using the eyelets for any other purpose could result in the vehicle being damaged"

And no, they are not being cute with the language by implying that there separate tiedown eyelets and towing/recover eyelets. It is where the eyelets screw into that is the weak point for towing. A real tow truck will use straps or chains to attach to the axle of the vehicle in a recovery situation

I can quote the manual too:


Notice the difference in verbiage (tiedown vs. towing)? This is part of the reason I'm so adamant in stating that there are two different hooks. Also, note that the screw point remains the same in your manual excerpt and mine, the only thing that could possibly be different is the eyelet.

If they are, in fact, the same hook, then I would admit my error and come to the conclusion that Mazda needs to revise it's manuals (as well as the part descriptions on the many sites that sell the eyelet).

cap1.JPG
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I can quote the manual too:


Notice the difference in verbiage (tiedown vs. towing)? This is part of the reason I'm so adamant in stating that there are two different hooks. Also, note that the screw point remains the same in your manual excerpt and mine, the only thing that could possibly be different is the eyelet.

If they are, in fact, the same hook, then I would admit my error and come to the conclusion that Mazda needs to revise it's manuals (as well as the part descriptions on the many sites that sell the eyelet).
Both links you posted are not for CX-5. Mazda uses “Towing Eyelet” and “Towing Hook” alternatively in CX-9’s owner’s manual; but uses “Tiedown Eyelet” and “Tiedown Hook” alternatively in CX-5’s owner’s manual. Noticed that in Emergency Towing section of CX-9 owner’s manual, all the towing with supplied towing eyelet / hook if applicable is for Mexico only, not for USA and Canada.

I’ve seen both supplied tiedown eyelets in the brand new 2015 CX-5 and so called towing hooks sold at Mazda parts side by side in person, and they’re exactly the same. Mazda really needs to be consistent on this eyelet/hook naming among all documents including the name in parts list.

I do believe the possible damage the manual mentioned by using the tiedown eyelets / hooks is on the frame taking the eyelet / hook, because the eyelet / hook itself looks too strong to get damaged.

And if there were some true towing hooks available for CX-5, the owner’s manual should said so preventing owners use the supplied tiedown eyelets for emergency towing accidentally which “could result in the vehicle being damaged”!
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
Both links you posted are not for CX-5.

From a post I made in the other thread:

P/N KD53-50-EJ1B is absolutely the correct eyelet for the 2nd gen CX-5. It does indeed exist, as referenced on many different parts sites. It is also the same eyelet used on the 2016+CX-9, 2014+ Mazda3, 2014+ Mazda6, and 2016+ Miata. They do call it a "tow hook", but IMO it should only be used for recovery or to tow the vehicle onto a flatbed.

They all use the same part number, including the 2017+ CX-5, which also happens to be the subject vehicle from the other thread, and the vehicle the sales consultant is talking about.


Mazda uses “Towing Eyelet” and “Towing Hook” alternatively in CX-9’s owner’s manual; but uses “Tiedown Eyelet” and “Tiedown Hook” alternatively in CX-5’s owner’s manual.

See above. They all use the same part number for the "tow hook". However, the CX-9 manual link and the MX-5 manual link both provide safety info for using the tow hook for recovery purposes ("The towing eyelet should be used in an emergency (to get the vehicle out of a ditch or a snow bank, for example)"). In the 2016 CX-5 manual you're referencing, they mention tiedown hooks, not tow hooks, and the cautions are quite different.

Here's another example of why I think there are two different eyelets. Pulled from the current CX-5 Owner's Manual:


Now, if there truly is only one type of eyelet, why would they mention tiedown eyelets and say they must never be used for anything other than vehicle/cargo tiedown, and then mention towing eyelets in the current CX-5 owner's manual? They also happen to mention towing eyelets in the previous gen's manual.

Further, it doesn't make sense to say that you can't tow with the tiedown eyelet in the first gen, then say that you can tow with the towing eyelet in the second gen, if the tiedown and towing eyelet are the same as you claim them to be.

One possibility is that the eyelet receiver/frame construction was changed in the 2017+ models somehow, but I have no way to validate that.


Noticed that in Emergency Towing section of CX-9 owner’s manual, all the towing with supplied towing eyelet / hook if applicable is for Mexico only, not for USA and Canada.

That could simply be because Mazda Mexico includes the correct towing eyelets as factory equipment, while MNAO does not.


I’ve seen both supplied tiedown eyelets in the brand new 2015 CX-5 and so called towing hooks sold at Mazda parts side by side in person, and they’re exactly the same.

I agree, they probably do look the same. I'm not so sure that they actually are the same though.


Mazda really needs to be consistent on this eyelet/hook naming among all documents including the name in parts list.

And if there were some true towing hooks available for CX-5, the owner’s manual should said so preventing owners use the supplied tiedown eyelets for emergency towing accidentally which “could result in the vehicle being damaged”!

100% percent agree with this. MNAO needs to clarify this and revise all of their manuals and provide part numbers where necessary.



Regardless of what anyone thinks, these tow hooks should only be used as a last resort. Most experienced tow truck operators have better, safer ways to pull a car out of a ditch.
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
sm1ke, you seem a bit spun up about this. It's clear that Mazda could have been more thorough in how they've documented this. But I expect to find some inconsistencies and generalities that don't' get corrected in further revs. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if they maintained the same part number for a part but changed its "name" or "description" and then failed to find every instance in their documentation to update.

From what I can tell, Mazda hasn't elaborated on what damage may occur if people thread in an eyelet to their bumper and tug. Nor is it likely in their interest to. They've made a blanket statement discouraging end users for doing that, probably to limit their liability.

It's possible that they've done it for reasons that would apply equally to older models than to new, or it may be because of something unique to later model CX-5s.

Some plausible reasons are:
1) In some test during R&D damage occurred while tugging on the eyelet.
2) There have been warranty or other field claims from damage due to using the eyelet.
3) They can save money by re-using the shipping eyelets and not including them with the car
4) The 2nd gen CX-5 houses the eyelet in a painted section of the bumper. Perhaps tow strap at an angle can damage the delicate and difficult to match paint on the bumper.
5) The body colored eyelet covers are expensive to replace and are not available pre-painted. If people aren't removing them they are less likely to get lost or damaged.

Could probably think of several more plausible reasons why they may have made the change to recommending against customers touching these things.

None of those reasons require them to change the design of the parts, nor the part number under which they manufacture, distribute or procure them. It may be a difficult and or messy process to try and find the places the part is referred to by number or name. Some of which may be outside of their control (databases by 3rd parties and such).
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
sm1ke, you seem a bit spun up about this.

What gives you that idea? I'm just providing an informed opinion based on the information that is available to me.


It's clear that Mazda could have been more thorough in how they've documented this. But I expect to find some inconsistencies and generalities that don't' get corrected in further revs. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if they maintained the same part number for a part but changed its "name" or "description" and then failed to find every instance in their documentation to update.

Sure, but 3.5 years and they still haven't made the proper changes to their in-house documentation and databases? That's a stretch, even for a low-resource company like Mazda. Makes even less sense when you consider the fact that the most up-to-date version of the manual includes instructions for using the towing eyelet, while older versions do not. Why would they add that info if they wanted to discourage people from using them as tow/recovery options? Why would Mazda add the part to their parts database as a tow hook applicable to the 2017+ CX-5, if they didn't want people to use them for that purpose?


From what I can tell, Mazda hasn't elaborated on what damage may occur if people thread in an eyelet to their bumper and tug. Nor is it likely in their interest to. They've made a blanket statement discouraging end users for doing that, probably to limit their liability.

Do you have a source for that blanket statement? From what I've seen so far, the tiedown eyelet (which we don't have a part number for) is not to be used for towing/recovery. But the towing eyelet is referenced in the current manual (along with best practices).


It's possible that they've done it for reasons that would apply equally to older models than to new, or it may be because of something unique to later model CX-5s.

Some plausible reasons are:
1) In some test during R&D damage occurred while tugging on the eyelet.
2) There have been warranty or other field claims from damage due to using the eyelet.
3) They can save money by re-using the shipping eyelets and not including them with the car
4) The 2nd gen CX-5 houses the eyelet in a painted section of the bumper. Perhaps tow strap at an angle can damage the delicate and difficult to match paint on the bumper.
5) The body colored eyelet covers are expensive to replace and are not available pre-painted. If people aren't removing them they are less likely to get lost or damaged.

Could probably think of several more plausible reasons why they may have made the change to recommending against customers touching these things.

None of those reasons require them to change the design of the parts, nor the part number under which they manufacture, distribute or procure them. It may be a difficult and or messy process to try and find the places the part is referred to by number or name. Some of which may be outside of their control (databases by 3rd parties and such).

All good points, if they had initially said it was fine to use the towing eyelets for recovery, then retracted that statement. From what I can see, it's the other way around. First gen CX-5 manuals state that you can't use the tiedown eyelets. Second gen manuals state that you can use the towing eyelet. The part number for the towing eyelet shows that it is applicable to the 2017+ CX-5, and the part name is "tow hook" in Mazda's own parts database. There is a lot of current evidence to suggest that KD53-50-EJ1B can be used, if used correctly.


As far as why I personally want to figure this out so much. I write, edit, and revise manuals for a living. Been doing it for nearly 10 years now, writing for everything from military aircraft to municipal government to agricultural equipment. Just comes natural to question inconsistencies, I guess.
 

Chris_Top_Her

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:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
That's pretty much general car knowledge.. when you do that you are pulling the car by the bumper, and it's off center. Why would you risk fatiguing your actual bumper (which is specifically designed to crumple) instead of using the real hardened tow points, which are big eyelets on the frame rails just behind the front tire. The bumper eyelet is a last ditch or wrecked car item. Any tow truck driver who dives for the bumper tow hook first is either a noob, or doesn't care about the integrity of your vehicle. That being said, it's no surprise that the cars don't include them anymore as it's just something for someone to use incorrectly.

Remember the general driver has little to no mechanical inclination about their vehicle. A while back a guy was crying here/on the fb page about how the spare tire didn't fit.. come to find out he was putting it on the front (where it wont fit), which is never recommended, and specifically against the manual.

I don't see why he would bother popping a painted part of a new car he is trying to sell lol. Nor why he would show the proper tow points to a layman, as the tow truck driver typically knows. I've never once seen a tow truck driver try to winch my car up using anything other than the frame rail hole (they would have got an earful). The only other place I would allow is control arms.
 
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2013 Mazda CX-5 Sport FWD Auto
That's pretty much general car knowledge.. when you do that you are pulling the car by the bumper, and it's off center. Why would you risk fatiguing your actual bumper (which is specifically designed to crumple) instead of using the real hardened tow points, which are big eyelets on the frame rails just behind the front tire. The bumper eyelet is a last ditch or wrecked car item. Any tow truck driver who dives for the bumper tow hook first is either a noob, or doesn't care about the integrity of your vehicle. That being said, it's no surprise that the cars don't include them anymore as it's just something for someone to use incorrectly.

Remember the general driver has little to no mechanical inclination about their vehicle. A while back a guy was crying here/on the fb page about how the spare tire didn't fit.. come to find out he was putting it on the front (where it wont fit), which is never recommended, and specifically against the manual.

I don't see why he would bother popping a painted part of a new car he is trying to sell lol. Nor why he would show the proper tow points to a layman, as the tow truck driver typically knows. I've never once seen a tow truck driver try to winch my car up using anything other than the frame rail hole (they would have got an earful). The only other place I would allow is control arms.

to summarize: leave it to a professional. How many times in anybody's life have they ever “recovered” their car, by themselves, by means of one of these eyelets? Following this has been hilarious!
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
That's pretty much general car knowledge.. when you do that you are pulling the car by the bumper, and it's off center. Why would you risk fatiguing your actual bumper (which is specifically designed to crumple) instead of using the real hardened tow points, which are big eyelets on the frame rails just behind the front tire. The bumper eyelet is a last ditch or wrecked car item. Any tow truck driver who dives for the bumper tow hook first is either a noob, or doesn't care about the integrity of your vehicle. That being said, it's no surprise that the cars don't include them anymore as it's just something for someone to use incorrectly.

Remember the general driver has little to no mechanical inclination about their vehicle. A while back a guy was crying here/on the fb page about how the spare tire didn't fit.. come to find out he was putting it on the front (where it wont fit), which is never recommended, and specifically against the manual.

I don't see why he would bother popping a painted part of a new car he is trying to sell lol. Nor why he would show the proper tow points to a layman, as the tow truck driver typically knows. I've never once seen a tow truck driver try to winch my car up using anything other than the frame rail hole (they would have got an earful). The only other place I would allow is control arms.
I didn't know there were tow points behind the front tires. Thanks.