L+R front brake pads not in full contact with the inner face of the rotor?

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Mazda CX-5 2014 GT
Pictured here are the left and right surface of the inner side rotor. As you can see, only half of the disc has contact/grooves. While the outer side (not pictured) has full contact. Do you guys think this is normal? I've been going to the same dealership since day 1, I'm not really sure if they notice this or somehow i thought this is normal until today when they asked me that i need to replace my rotors and pads due to rust. I did not hear any mention about this situation.
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2014 & 2019 CX-5 Touring(s)
Kinda looks like the wrong pads were put on. I think you're gonna have to open it up to see what exactly is happening.
 
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2016.5 CX-5 GT AWD titanium/black 2016 Miata Club ST MT white
That is absolutely NOT normal.

Take a look at these rotors, they're from my 2003 Silverado about 4 years ago. The brakes were all OEM and never had an issue.

Click to zoom.

outside


inside


Now THAT'S bad! I was shocked when I saw how bad these rotors were! I'm surprised that I had any stopping power at all. Just look at those two at the bottom! Those are from the rear of the truck.

Needless to say I had to R&R the entire brake system, including new rotors of course.

The OP will also need new rotors, those are shot.
 
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2016.5 CX-5 GT AWD titanium/black 2016 Miata Club ST MT white
I'm guessing that the caliper slide pins haven't been lubricated in a while and the inside pads aren't putting even pressure on the rotor
In my case the pins were a mess. I replaced them as well.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
So much of it depends on the environment, and how often and for what distances you drive.
Short infrequent trips in a cold wintery climate will destroy rotors and calipers, regardless of miles.
My previous Nissans were bad for that, especially the rears.
My Altima needed rear brakes every few years, and I replaced calipers twice in ten years.
I didn't drive it much.
Same thing is happening with my 6 unfortunately.
My rears already look like the ones in the above pics from Conrad's Silverado, and I'm only at 12,000 miles.
Maybe if brake components weren't made out of bare steel, we'd have less of a problem.
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
Pictured here are the left and right surface of the inner side rotor. As you can see, only half of the disc has contact/grooves. While the outer side (not pictured) has full contact. Do you guys think this is normal? I've been going to the same dealership since day 1, I'm not really sure if they notice this or somehow i thought this is normal until today when they asked me that i need to replace my rotors and pads due to rust. I did not hear any mention about this situation.
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Are these the original pads and rotors? I think you need a brake job. They will (should) clean and lube all pins and components so the inside wears like the outside.
 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
This is not normal. Actually scary abnormal.

This is why I do my own brakes. Even if the dealer follows everything by the book and uses OEM parts my process is better. Why and how? Time. I take the time and go through all the details.

I do a thorough cleaning of the calipers. I lube the caliper pins with high temp silicone grease on all rubber-to-metal friction parts and burp the air out. I install my favorite aftermarket pads (currently Raybestos Element3 although I recommend staying with OEM rear pads) and apply high temp copper grease to all metal-to-metal moving friction parts except the rotor surface of course. I then install quality slotted rotors to ensure no glazing ever occurs again. Then I bleed the braking system and install new brake fluid.

The dealer doesn't have that extra time with all the cars they have to work on. Plus they're merely going to resurface the rotor and maybe install new pads. If that is the result of their work OP and you decide to come back you need to ask for some type of refund for their labor. The OEM pad replacement has lifetime replacement (free pads) not the labor. The reasoning is simply this is not acceptable. That said if you are able physically you can change the rotors and pads yourself. There's resources available here to help you.
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
I make it a point to spray down the calipers etc at every car wash. Self serve car wash w/pressure and in the winter and just fresh water when doing it in the driveway in good weather. The openings between the wheel spokes makes it a lot easier than my last car. On that car the rotors looked similar to Conrad 16.5's. Lack of contact and actually milky white spots on the inside surface and poor braking. Lots of short hops (2 miles to work) and salted or brine on roads before the first potential snowflake hit the ground. They don't have to pay for corrosion damage.

While on the subject of corrosion, I learned the hard way (hundreds of dollars chasing and finally finding and fixing an A/C leak on that car) to spray down the radiator and A/C condenser and all around it at every car wash. The bottom corner of the aluminum condenser corroded from dirt and salt accumulation and took 3 attempts with UV dye to finally find.At every car wash the CX-5 gets the wand thru the grill and the opening below and sprayed down real good. The engine and firewall and fenders also get sprayed down occasionally. In a climate where the roads are salted, you have to be vigilant in cleaning areas that act like a shelf for salt to accumulate.

Detergent and fresh water are your friends.
 
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2016.5 CX-5 GT AWD titanium/black 2016 Miata Club ST MT white
I make it a point to spray down the calipers etc at every car wash. Self serve car wash w/pressure and in the winter and just fresh water when doing it in the driveway in good weather. The openings between the wheel spokes makes it a lot easier than my last car. On that car the rotors looked similar to Conrad 16.5's. Lack of contact and actually milky white spots on the inside surface and poor braking. Lots of short hops (2 miles to work) and salted or brine on roads before the first potential snowflake hit the ground. They don't have to pay for corrosion damage.

While on the subject of corrosion, I learned the hard way (hundreds of dollars chasing and finally finding and fixing an A/C leak on that car) to spray down the radiator and A/C condenser and all around it at every car wash. The bottom corner of the aluminum condenser corroded from dirt and salt accumulation and took 3 attempts with UV dye to finally find.At every car wash the CX-5 gets the wand thru the grill and the opening below and sprayed down real good. The engine and firewall and fenders also get sprayed down occasionally. In a climate where the roads are salted, you have to be vigilant in cleaning areas that act like a shelf for salt to accumulate.

Detergent and fresh water are your friends.
Absolutely right! The reason that my truck rotors were so bad was short trips in the winter brine of Northern Illinois roads. At the time my wife was driving the truck back and forth to work, a 5 mile trip one way. She'd drive it home and park it in the garage and the brake components would marinate in the brine. Not her fault, as she had no idea. I should have known better.

What's the solution to the above? There's no way to wash the brine off before parking it every time, right? The best solution that I now have is to be sure the heat up the brakes before parking the vehicle. If you can get the brakes hot before parking at least the water can evaporate and dry the brake components off a bit. Do a couple of hard controlled stops before parking to warm up them brakes!
 
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16.5 CX-5 Tour/AWD
One of the best tips the master tech at the Mazda dealer I worked at gave me was to clean and relube the caliper slide pins once a year
That's good advice but if you're doing your own tire rotations, it would make sense to inspect, lube the brake pads and slider pins as well since the car is already lifted and the wheels are off in addition to cleaning/lubing the pad mounting hardware. Might be overkill but the braking feel is night and day better.
 
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2008 Mazda CX-9 Touring FWD . 2014 CX-5 GT FWD
Pictured here are the left and right surface of the inner side rotor. As you can see, only half of the disc has contact/grooves. While the outer side (not pictured) has full contact. Do you guys think this is normal? I've been going to the same dealership since day 1, I'm not really sure if they notice this or somehow i thought this is normal until today when they asked me that i need to replace my rotors and pads due to rust. I did not hear any mention about this situation.
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View attachment 226813
Check that the "cross" on the caliper piston is aligned to allow the pin on the pad to fit in the recess. If not, this will tip the pads and cause the uneven wear. Don't ask me how I know this. :rolleyes:
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
Check that the "cross" on the caliper piston is aligned to allow the pin on the pad to fit in the recess. If not, this will tip the pads and cause the uneven wear. Don't ask me how I know this. :rolleyes:
I was trying to imagine how the wear pattern in the pictures could have occurred. This makes sense. If its tilted, the pad will start with a line contact, but wear down faster and spread to a larger contact patch with the rotor. Braking from that corner is probably terrible. At least both sides were comparable.
 
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