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Noise and Vibration with Mazda6 2018 GT

I have a mazda 6 2018 for 2.5 years. I recently started to drive longer distance on freeway, and the noise and vibration are certainly not good for touring. I am wondering whether...

1) There is something wrong with my car, or this is a universal issue for Mazda6?

2) Would changing the tires from OEM falken to Pilot Sport A/S 3+ help?

3) Is there anything else that could make the trips more comfortable?
 

sm1ke

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Are your tire PSIs set to the recommended levels according to the placard in the driver's side door jamb? Do you rotate your tires at regular intervals (every oil change)? Are all tires wearing evenly? If you drive in a snowy climate, are the wheel wells free of ice and snow?

What I would do is check PSIs to make sure they're in spec (check when the wheels are "cold", i.e. not right after a drive), then check for noise/vibration. If I were still having issues, I'd take each wheel off of the car to inspect for damage and uneven wear. Then I'd clean the wheel hub surfaces to ensure the wheels seat tightly on the wheel hub. When reinstalling each wheel, I'd make sure to torque the lugnuts correctly (in a star pattern and using a torque wrench, if available). If I were still getting vibrations after that, I would have an alignment performed using a Hunter road force balancing machine (most popular tire shops have these available). If I were still having issues after alignment, I'd probably experiment with lowering/raising the tire PSI slightly until I was able to buy new tires.
 
Are your tire PSIs set to the recommended levels according to the placard in the driver's side door jamb? Do you rotate your tires at regular intervals (every oil change)? Are all tires wearing evenly? If you drive in a snowy climate, are the wheel wells free of ice and snow?

What I would do is check PSIs to make sure they're in spec (check when the wheels are "cold", i.e. not right after a drive), then check for noise/vibration. If I were still having issues, I'd take each wheel off of the car to inspect for damage and uneven wear. Then I'd clean the wheel hub surfaces to ensure the wheels seat tightly on the wheel hub. When reinstalling each wheel, I'd make sure to torque the lugnuts correctly (in a star pattern and using a torque wrench, if available). If I were still getting vibrations after that, I would have an alignment performed using a Hunter road force balancing machine (most popular tire shops have these available). If I were still having issues after alignment, I'd probably experiment with lowering/raising the tire PSI slightly until I was able to buy new tires.
I checked the PSIs and they are slightly lower than the recommended levels, which I think is normal. I rotate each time I went to the dealership (3 times for past two years). From dealer's report all tires are even. I don't drive in snowy climate.

I am not sure whether the noise is an abnormal thing for mazda 6. I could tell my car is noisier and more bumpy compared to other cars in the same category like camry and altima. However, if this is true for all mazda 6s, then there shouldn't be anything huge here.
 

sm1ke

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Hopefully other Mazda6 owners can contribute some feedback regarding the suspension and tires. Mazda being Mazda, I would assume that the Mazda6 would feel more firm than a Camry or Altima as that would play into their sporty image. With that said, I'm not sure how noisy the OEM tires are, but most tires on newer Mazdas like yours and mine are designed to be on the quieter, more fuel efficient side. The OEM Bridgestones that came on my 18 CX-9 were very quiet.

How much mileage do you have on the OEM tires? Is it possible that they're nearing the end of their usable life, and that's why they sound/feel different than before?
 
Hopefully other Mazda6 owners can contribute some feedback regarding the suspension and tires. Mazda being Mazda, I would assume that the Mazda6 would feel more firm than a Camry or Altima as that would play into their sporty image. With that said, I'm not sure how noisy the OEM tires are, but most tires on newer Mazdas like yours and mine are designed to be on the quieter, more fuel efficient side. The OEM Bridgestones that came on my 18 CX-9 were very quiet.

How much mileage do you have on the OEM tires? Is it possible that they're nearing the end of their usable life, and that's why they sound/feel different than before?
I got 20k miles which do not sound like a lot. It is not really I found it is different than before. More precisely, I should have said I feel noisier and more bumpy compared to other cars in the same category. I was too lazy to consider this before, but now I have some free time...
 

sm1ke

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Ah I see, I think I understand now. So there has been no big change in NVH (noise, vibration, hardness) in your Mazda6 over the years, its just that you recently noticed that other cars like the Camry and Altima are more soft-riding.

Newer tires could help, but how much, I'm not sure. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
 
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‘17 CX9 & ‘19 3 GT
I got 20k miles which do not sound like a lot. It is not really I found it is different than before. More precisely, I should have said I feel noisier and more bumpy compared to other cars in the same category. I was too lazy to consider this before, but now I have some free time...
When I had my Mazda 6 (GS trim level or Sport) I found the NVH quiet even when driving on the highway. When I replaced the Yokohama OEM tires to Nokians it became even more quiet due to less tire road noise now when you compare it to others in its class like Camry and Altima, you’ll find the ride of the 6 a bit more firm and bumpy but still comfortable. Camry and Altima will have a softer ride as suspension tuning is on the softer side vs the 6 which will have a firmer suspension. Mazda has improved the NVH with more sound deadening materials on the 2018s and newer (thicker front windshield, double pane side windows and under cabin dampers, etc). While the Camry and Altima may ride softer, they may not necessarily be more quiet as I don’t think they use more sound deadening materials than the 6.
 

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