Ended up going with the Acura RDX...

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2021 RDX A-Spec
If you think so.... The MOTOR has been out longer than the RDX itself so it has been a while and the issue affects Accord owners as well. IMHO it is indicative of sloppy work on Honda's part. As I said my 16 RDX was full of issues which is why I sold it rather than holding onto it. I originally planned to keep it a long time but with my issues, decided it was best to sell before it got up in mileage (I sold it in '19 around 60k). As I said, I hope yours is trouble free....
Is it really any more or less sloppy than the CX-5's own engine stalling problem? It's worth noting that, unlike the CX-5, the RDX's stalling problem isn't even widespread enough to require a recall.

(Note: I'm not sure how long the base motor has been around, but the RDX/Accord stalling issue was related to the intercooler, which only affects the 2.0 turbo models and I'm 90% sure those were not offered until around 2018.)

I don't doubt that your 2016 RDX had a lot of problems though. As noted by others in this thread, Honda really got lazy during that generation of cars. I take some comfort in the fact that their CEO publicly acknowledged their "quality crisis" a couple years back and vowed to fix it.
 
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2021 RDX A-Spec
To be fair, the 27K car you reference doesn't have a turbo motor so you need to set a bar of CX-5 models with the turbo. The Carbon edition with a turbo and FWD compares to a Base RDX FWD pretty well, but it has leather which the RDX does not. 5k (31k for the CX-5 and 36k for the RDX) difference if price is what I am seeing on Cars Direct. If you go to the higher trim levels, the Advance compares pretty well to the Signature and your difference is 38k for the CX-5 vs 46k for the RDX. To me, the CX-5 kills the RDX on value and certainly is a more reliable option. RDX wins on interior room though and has a much better sound system in top trims.
Just throwing this out there: Acura's sticker price is misleading because their dealers budge FAR more than your average Mazda dealer. Easy 10-15% off MSRP. So while the CX-5 Sig is still cheaper, an informed buyer only needs to pay a couple grand more for an RDX Advance, which in terms of features alone makes them darn near equals considering the RDX Advance has pano roof, 16-speakers, better infotainment screen, better seats, etc.
 
Just throwing this out there: Acura's sticker price is misleading because their dealers budge FAR more than your average Mazda dealer. Easy 10-15% off MSRP. So while the CX-5 Sig is still cheaper, an informed buyer only needs to pay a couple grand more for an RDX Advance, which in terms of features alone makes them darn near equals considering the RDX Advance has pano roof, 16-speakers, better infotainment screen, better seats, etc.

I can't for some reason multi-quote. But the engine stall on mazda's part was mostly just the 2.5l naturally aspirated non turbo models and was a software issue. Where as Acura/Honda's was a fuel pump, which I think is a bit more problematic. So much so that Honda had to issue a stop sale and Mazda just reprogrammed their vehicles.

I'm also not sure that's completely true on MSRP. At least not everywhere. Maybe they're just admitting then that Acura products are overpriced ;)

I'm going to say the better infotainment screen is also subjective. 2021 Mazda screen's are pretty impressive and much better than before. In terms of infotainment usability I'd also prefer Mazda, even in my 2019 GT-R. Give me a scroll wheel any day compared to the trackpad/mouse thing which shouldn't be on any car.

Let's also not forget we are comparing apples to organic apples here. Mazda is not yet considered a luxury brand, even though it is trying to move upmarket. Acura, from its inception has been considered a luxury brand. I think it's much more impressive that the CX5 is being compared to cars in a higher class than comparing an Acura to something in a lower class. Let's not forget that the Mazda technically competes with the CR-V. Also again, the Acura is from a luxury brand, I'd really hope that everything is better. But this is all subjective and most of us on the forum choose the CX-5 for a reason (and so did Car and Driver).
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sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
Just throwing this out there: Acura's sticker price is misleading because their dealers budge FAR more than your average Mazda dealer. Easy 10-15% off MSRP. So while the CX-5 Sig is still cheaper, an informed buyer only needs to pay a couple grand more for an RDX Advance, which in terms of features alone makes them darn near equals considering the RDX Advance has pano roof, 16-speakers, better infotainment screen, better seats, etc.

As I recall, before the supply/inventory issues, "informed buyers" were regularly getting an easy 10-15% off as well. We have to keep in mind that every person is different in their approach to car buying - some can haggle better than others, and some are perfectly fine paying sticker price. That's why, when comparing pricing, we always use MSRP. Prices can vary wildly with how well one can negotiate, whether the dealer needs to meet a quota, whether a vehicle is in high demand, whether the salesperson had their coffee that morning, etc.
 
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2019 CX-5 GT
(Note: I'm not sure how long the base motor has been around, but the RDX/Accord stalling issue was related to the intercooler, which only affects the 2.0 turbo models and I'm 90% sure those were not offered until around 2018.)

The current gen Accord was released in the US in 2017 as a 2018 model. It has the same 2.0T (K20C4) used in the RDX, but tuned to 252hp rather than the 272hp in the RDX. So yep, it has been around a while. They started sales of the 2.0T in 12/17.
 

Chocolate

Harpy Eagle
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2019 CX-5 AWD
I can't for some reason multi-quote. But the engine stall on mazda's part was mostly just the 2.5l naturally aspirated non turbo models and was a software issue. Where as Acura/Honda's was a fuel pump, which I think is a bit more problematic. So much so that Honda had to issue a stop sale and Mazda just reprogrammed their vehicles.

I'm also not sure that's completely true on MSRP. At least not everywhere. Maybe they're just admitting then that Acura products are overpriced ;)

I'm going to say the better infotainment screen is also subjective. 2021 Mazda screen's are pretty impressive and much better than before. In terms of infotainment usability I'd also prefer Mazda, even in my 2019 GT-R. Give me a scroll wheel any day compared to the trackpad/mouse thing which shouldn't be on any car.

Let's also not forget we are comparing apples to organic apples here. Mazda is not yet considered a luxury brand, even though it is trying to move upmarket. Acura, from its inception has been considered a luxury brand. I think it's much more impressive that the CX5 is being compared to cars in a higher class than comparing an Acura to something in a lower class. Let's not forget that the Mazda technically competes with the CR-V. Also again, the Acura is from a luxury brand, I'd really hope that everything is better. But this is all subjective and most of us on the forum choose the CX-5 for a reason (and so did Car and Driver). View attachment 234731

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The reviews really say it all. Note the completely different tone, and the lack of praise for the design of the Acura.

I believe the CX-5 is, objectively, a better value. The prices listed above were accurate: $33,160 MSRP gets you a CX-5 with turbo, AWD, 19" wheels, and leather seats, which matches most of the RDX's features. Previously, this could only be had in the GT-R trim (MSRP: $36,385), but Mazda has decided to increase sales volume by offering those luxury features from higher trims and the turbo motor at a lower price. The base RDX AWD starts at $41,425 MSRP. If you want an A-Spec AWD, it adds a mandatory $2,900 package and will set you back $47,325 MSRP. (All prices including destination). US Mazda dealers are having no trouble selling the Carbon Edition AWD/Turbo models as fast as they get them in. The only Carbon Edition CX-5s available nationwide on Autotrader are 3 FWD Carbons. There are a ton of unsold RDX A-Specs nationwide at that $47,325 MSRP price, though. That doesn't mean one car is better than the other, but it is telling about supply and demand.

New Acura RDX A-Specs for sale

New CX-5 Carbon Turbos for sale
 
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Kia optima
Depends which reviews you are reading, many online publications have rdx in top 3 for compact luxury suv. Their sales numbers are also top 3 in category so I don't think they have problems moving units. Acura needs to tighten their QC.
 
All I'm saying is a used low-mile GLC43 AMG/M40i/SQ5 comes in at around $40-45K...why people buy RDX's is beyond me :p
Because used German vehicles of the AMG/M/S trim are driven hard by leasees, and because maintenance and insurance premiums skyrocket with those vehicles. Smart shoppers look beyond purchase price and consider true cost to own.
 
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CX5 GT-R
Because used German vehicles of the AMG/M/S trim are driven hard by leasees, and because maintenance and insurance premiums skyrocket with those vehicles. Smart shoppers look beyond purchase price and consider true cost to own.
If I were buying an unreliable vehicle, it would be fun. Very. Spending $40k+ is already a frivolous decision when it involves an unnecessary depreciating asset.
 
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
. Easy 10-15% off MSRP. So while the CX-5 Sig is still cheaper, an informed buyer only needs to pay a couple grand more for an RDX Advance,
I think this is a major, YMMV.

I got my 2020 Signature last April for $32,495,00 (MSRP over $38,000). I could be wrong, but I don't think an RDX, even used 2019 at the time, could have been bought for anywhere near "a couple grand more". Let alone taking in to account the cost of brakes or non-DIY maintenance in 5 years.
 
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