What have you done to your P5 today?

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03 p5, 92 miata
Okay, well please keep me in mind for that stuff, especially the shifter.
Just replaced an HID bulb and it was a multi hour nightmare that's making me hate my current setup. I don't mind a project if they're rough.
I have had my projectors on since I think 2012 and somehow in all that time I did not need to change a bulb. I always dreaded it as I am sure I would need to open the lights back up in order to change it reliably.
 

EVADE

TEAM PRO 5 PRES.
Contributor
:
OPTION WAGON
I drove the Pro5 today after sitting for 2 weeks LOL I’ve been really slacking on trying to get it back in it’s Prime 😢
 

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AC compressor died followed by a leaking water pump.

Replaced Waterpump plus timing belt change at 208k and tires rotated and balanced.

Still needs to do the rust repair on the doors, but first old girl needs a wash...

g1gpI7hh.jpg
 
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03 p5, 92 miata
Well, I talked to some scrapyards to get a price on having my p5 taken away. So now I need to take off what parts I can to spread that love to the community here. Projector headlights may make their way to someone on here (ill snap some pics), gauge rings will for sure be sold here.

I have a twm short shifter which I will try to get off, but it is rusty looking from the bottom side of the car. Not sure if it is going to be worth the trouble unless someone really wants it and the money is good!

It'll be bitter sweet to see the car go, but its been parked since december, rust, battery is flat, and mice made it a home for themselves over the winter. The time has come :(
 
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Dallas, TX
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2003 Protege5
I replaced my rear stabilizer (sway) bar bushings today, hoping that would help with my clicking. It didn't improve anything, and based on how good the 20-year-old bushings looked, I'm not surprised. I used OEM part GE4T-28-156 (fit perfectly, was the same part number as the original, and is half the cost of the other Mazda OEM part that fits the P5) and a little white lithium grease as I didn't have the rubber grease indicated in the service manual. White lithium isn't supposed to degrade rubber from what I've read. I had the car up on jack stands and it was level, so nothing was under tension and I didn't have to undo the end links. I got front OEM replacement bushings as well, but haven't attempted to put them on yet and might not based on today's [non-]results. (I got clicks coming from the front too.)

The clicking occurs equally on both sides. I may be overdue for some new strut mounts as I only replaced the struts themselves several years back and not the entire strut assembly. I replaced the end links recently, so I'll recheck the torque on them next.
 

i12drivemyMP5

___ 323F ___
Contributor
Anybody wanna guess at what my front driver window just did?.....left from a drive-thru and was rolling it up and it made a loud pop at most of the way up and glass went back down in the door. Wouldn't roll up or down on it's own. Was enough above top of door to get ahold of and pull it back up into place so the glass must be in the tracks but the register must have some issue. I can hear the motor spinning when you push or pull the switch. At least it didn't shatter when it happened. Looks like door panel is coming off soon. Good thing it has a garage to hide out in, lol.
 
If you can't get a hold of a regulator soon, Looking at the pics on rock auto it is similar to one I had fail on a car when I was younger and wayy more broke lol. I took the track the window rides on the regulator and bent it with the window all the way up so that the holder couldn't come down. Mine didn't fall down like that though, the cable got bound up in the drum near the motor and it broke the drum, letting the window come down about an inch. that held for a few months for a replacement but I would say it could be a permanent fix.

You are doing better than my co worker though, last week he had his left window shatter in the semi when he lowered it. 98f without the heat index with four hours to ride home. 🔥🥵
 
I replaced my rear stabilizer (sway) bar bushings today, hoping that would help with my clicking.
Have you inspected/replaced the Lower Control Arms? I just did this job in my MSP - on which the suspension sounded like a bag of broken crutches rattling and clicking - and the noise is gone and ride much improved.

Check the inner bushing to see if it is torn like this:
IMG_2393.JPG




I have to say, this job was a long time in the making. I wish I'd done it earlier as the suspension has been rattling like a bag of broken crutches since I bought it 18mos ago. The toughest part is getting the inner bushing lined up properly. Had to use a floor jack to lift up the hub assembly and even then, you can't see the alignment of the bushing and the hole so you can be sure you aren't cross-threading. Otherwise, a very straightforward job (well, only if you have an impact wrench) and it doesn't change the alignment.


IMG_2389.JPG

IMG_2390.JPG
 
:
Dallas, TX
:
2003 Protege5
Have you inspected/replaced the Lower Control Arms? I just did this job in my MSP - on which the suspension sounded like a bag of broken crutches rattling and clicking - and the noise is gone and ride much improved.

Check the inner bushing to see if it is torn like this:
View attachment 311317



I have to say, this job was a long time in the making. I wish I'd done it earlier as the suspension has been rattling like a bag of broken crutches since I bought it 18mos ago. The toughest part is getting the inner bushing lined up properly. Had to use a floor jack to lift up the hub assembly and even then, you can't see the alignment of the bushing and the hole so you can be sure you aren't cross-threading. Otherwise, a very straightforward job (well, only if you have an impact wrench) and it doesn't change the alignment.


View attachment 311316
View attachment 311318
Funny you should mention that... I've been sitting on a set of LCAs I got last year. My bushings are cracked, but they don't look nearly as bad as your old ones did. I came across the very good video below that, along with the advice I've received on this forum, will help me get this knocked out soon. I just need a day below 100 degrees here in TX.

Since I've never done this job, I have no clue about how one could cross-thread when installing that vertical bolt, but I've certainly heard a LOT about that one bolt and whatever it screws into and how much trouble it can be. Is there a nut above it that's not welded/captured that can just flop around or something? Is this only an issue with cars with rust problems?

Thank you for the extra motivation to do this. I'd love to get this car back to its original ride. It turns 20 this year, and I've had it since new.
 

323

(u_u) ...zZzZzzz
Moderator
@katapaltes, referencing the photo below, normally you would think the bolt would go straight through the bushing and start catching threads, but the bushing is cocked to one side requiring you to reposition the bolt while attempting screw it in. this is where the cross threading happens so you'll just need to be very careful. of course age and rust could have something to do with it. there is a welded nut for that bolt and i've also read sometimes it becomes unattached
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
@katapaltes, referencing the photo below, normally you would think the bolt would go straight through the bushing and start catching threads,..


The bolt does line up pretty good with the weight of the car pushing down on the control arm, but it twists out of alignment when it is dangling in the air.
That's why @Diamond_Dave and I had to lift up at the hub assembly with a floor jack.

This is how the alignment looks with the control arm hanging,..

Screenshot_20220707-095448_DuckDuckGo.jpg
 

i12drivemyMP5

___ 323F ___
Contributor
If you can't get a hold of a regulator soon, Looking at the pics on rock auto it is similar to one I had fail on a car when I was younger and wayy more broke lol. I took the track the window rides on the regulator and bent it with the window all the way up so that the holder couldn't come down. Mine didn't fall down like that though, the cable got bound up in the drum near the motor and it broke the drum, letting the window come down about an inch. that held for a few months for a replacement but I would say it could be a permanent fix.

You are doing better than my co worker though, last week he had his left window shatter in the semi when he lowered it. 98f without the heat index with four hours to ride home. 🔥🥵
Mine had one of the plastic corners break and the 2 spring loaded ends of cable housing near motor that clip into a bracket were ripped out. I have the nasty plastic laying sticky side up in my cargo area and the door panel leaning up in rear seat. Propped the window shut with a plastic container, a rolled up glove stuffed between it and a piece of a 2x4 wedged between glove and bottom of glass inside the door.

There are some that have wheels where wire makes corners into the regulator track and then some that have the stationary wire guides like oem. Both types of corners are plastic. Initially thought maybe the wheels at the corners might be a better thing but most likely will just go oem and wind the cable ends to my existing motor. Most of the cheapy ones come with a motor but only 1 yr warranty.....oem setup made it 20 yrs so that is probably best bet. Not like the car sees much action anyway so we'll see.

20220707_123740.jpg


20220707_123736.jpg

20220707_123651.jpg
 
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The bolt does line up pretty good with the weight of the car pushing down on the control arm, but it twists out of alignment when it is dangling in the air.
That's why @Diamond_Dave and I had to lift up at the hub assembly with a floor jack.

Good callout. When you unpackage the new control arms, you'll see the angle of that bushing.

FWIW, some non-intuitive, but extremely helpful tips on the lower control arm job:
As with many front suspension maintenance jobs, having the wheels at matching height/droop can help - so I used a Gorilla ramp on the opposing side to help even the suspension out.

Removal is pretty simple - just loosen and remove all of the bolts. For the Hub/Ball Joint, it's helpful to have a drift or pry bar or cold chisel to pry the hub off.

The inner bracket that secures the bushing side uses (3) different length bolts to attach it so pay attention as you remove them.

For Installation, the order of attachment is: (1) Ball joint (2) outer bushing (3) Install inner bushing bracket (4) start lifting hub / compressing strut (5) - (10) fiddle fart with trying to blindly thread the bushing bolt into the hidden captive body nut. This just takes patience and helps using a medium prybar to massage and move the control arm until you can thread the bolt.

Using https://www.amazon.com/dp/ (commissions earned) on your floor jack, in general, is a great upgrade, but for lifting the suspension, using one of these types of pucks can help stabilize the pressure of the hub/brake disc so that it doesn't walk out on you under pressure.

If I were to do this job again (on my P5), I'd probably replace the sway bar endlinks and get the rotors re-surfaced and replace brake pads at this time as well.
 
I came across the very good video below that, along with the advice I've received on this forum, will help me get this knocked out soon. I just need a day below 100 degrees here in TX.

Watching that video, I have two comments - 1) I can't see a valid reason to remove the caliper from the hub. I didn't do it on mine and it doesn't allow you any more room to work. 2) His inner bushing bolt was WAAYAYAYYAYAYY too easy to install. If yours is that easy, then congrats. Otherwise, I'm not sure what was different about his procedure.
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
,.. For the Hub/Ball Joint, it's helpful to have a drift or pry bar or cold chisel to pry the hub off.

Keep in mind that the pinch bolt needs to be completely removed.
The bolt fits into a notch in the ball joint stem.

Screenshot_20220707-162951_DuckDuckGo.jpg


I hammered a chisel in the crack to open it up a bit to release the ball joint stem. (after the bolt was out.)

IMG_20220707_163242.jpg
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
,..For Installation, the order of attachment is: (1) Ball joint (2) outer bushing (3) Install inner bushing bracket (4) start lifting hub / compressing strut (5) - (10) fiddle fart with trying to blindly thread the bushing bolt into the hidden captive body nut.

@Diamond_Dave That's what I did too.
That's what the service manual says. (they don't mention steps (5) - (10) though. Lol)

I remember backing off the 3 bracket bolts to give me a little more wobble room on the bracket, but I noticed that the guy in the video installed the bushing bolt before installing the bracket.

Screenshot_20220707-174858_DuckDuckGo.jpg


Maybe that's the trick that you and I didn't think of ??
(I still think you would have to lift the knuckle though because now the bracket holes will be out of alignment.? But at least you can see them.)

Screenshot_20220707-191008_Acrobat for Samsung.jpg
 
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Dallas, TX
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2003 Protege5
Watching that video, I have two comments - 1) I can't see a valid reason to remove the caliper from the hub. I didn't do it on mine and it doesn't allow you any more room to work. 2) His inner bushing bolt was WAAYAYAYYAYAYY too easy to install. If yours is that easy, then congrats. Otherwise, I'm not sure what was different about his procedure.
I replaced the driver's side LCA in 108-degree (that's 42 C for folks with more sane units of measurement). Heat index was 114 and I had limited shade. That was a huge mistake, but I took breaks and drank six bottles of water. My shirt became so heavy with sweat that it was like some kind of weighted workout jacket. Oh, and to top it off, we had a brief downpour in that 108 degrees while still in full sun. It was surreal. By the time I went back out it was a literal wet sauna. Man, everything hurts today and I had all kinds of crazy dreams waking me up last night so I didn't get a good night's sleep. Don't do this. Don't be me.

The key to successful installation *for me* was jacking up that knuckle to get the LCA completely horizontal. That allowed me to start the front bushing and the rear bracket+bolts with ease. DD, I've checked my other, new LCA and the original, removed LCA and the bolt hole on that rear bushing (or whatever it is) is boringly perpendicular to the rest of the part. So I'm not surprised that it was easy to install in my case. Now, I don't have OEM replacement parts, but some (NOS?) Beck Arnley ones, and they may be different from other brands.

My biggest problem with elevating that knuckle (which was a *requirement* for me) was that the floor jack was occupying the space where the ball joint needed to be when I'd swing the LCA up to get it horizontal. I tried turning the wheel all the way to the left or right to try and make some space, but in one of those directions, the end link contacted another piece of the suspension when I elevated the knuckle so that was a no-go. 😳 I ended up returning the steering wheel to center and went another route: Moving the knuckle fore and aft. In the end, I moved the knuckle forward a little farther than I wanted to as shown below. Hopefully I didn't hurt anything. After hours in the sun and an immobilized vehicle in my apartment parking lot, I honestly didn't care as long as I could get it moving to take it to a shop if needed. The other challenge was my not wanting to remove the cap from the ball joint boot until the very last minute. There are a lot of sharp parts down there including the knife-like disc brake shield, and I didn't want to destroy the ball joint boot.

DD, this is where I would say that removing the brake assembly, hub, and shield might help. If it allows more jacking options or keeps that ball joint boot safe it is well worth the additional minutes and bungee cord required. I will definitely do that for the other side. Also, if you're filming it like the guy in the video, it's a lot better for the viewer. :) Speaking of the video, I think the guy got the torque for the pinch bolt wrong (too high), and I can see from the service manual how he could have done that. I'll confirm that and if so, drop him a note in his Comment section.

Pics:
Found out what was making the noise after I removed my wheel 😉 (yes, it was there, but it wasn't making the noises):
1657464224757.png


Knuckle shoved to the front of the car while jacked, hopefully not too far:
1657464012818.png


Knuckle elevated with plastic ball joint cover installed till the bitter end:
1657464106778.png


Captured the order of the three different bolts for that rear bracket (actual LCA bolt would go in the empty space among them):
1657464364497.png
 
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pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
I finally watched the entire video and realized that @katapaltes and the guy in the video connected the ball joint last.
Both @Diamond_Dave and I hooked up the ball joint first and that's why we had to jack up the knuckle.

@Diamond_Dave mentioned that he sees no need to remove the caliper.
I figure the guy in the video removed the caliper to allow for clearance of the LCA to push up until it's horizontal, without hitting anything.


I'd suggest that you remove the caliper on the other side and do it like the guy in the video.


Screenshot_20220710-153211_DuckDuckGo.jpg
 
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