The Future of the CX-5 - Strategic?

If the CX-5 was only available in AWD, would you have bought it? (New, not used please)

  • Yes

    Votes: 17 85.0%
  • No

    Votes: 3 15.0%

  • Total voters
    20
:
2019 CX-5 Signature
Since Mazda has made it known that the 2022 CX-5 will only be available in AWD, I was wondering if this was a good strategy. I have my doubts, but my opinion is just that. Please respond if you purchased your CX-5 new. The year does not matter.
 
I haven't bought one yet, but I'm in the market, and it'll have no effect on me at all. I live in New England, there's not a single FWD CX-5 on a dealer lot within 250 miles of me (per Mazda's website) anyway.
 
:
2019 CX-5 Signature
I haven't bought one yet, but I'm in the market, and it'll have no effect on me at all. I live in New England, there's not a single FWD CX-5 on a dealer lot within 250 miles of me (per Mazda's website) anyway.
Same here. It would be really hard to find a FWD mainstream SUV from any manufacture in this area.
 
:
2019 CX-5 Signature
Im confused what this survey aims to answer and why.
It aims to answer "Will the CX-5 survive their new marketing plans in the US". When I created this, it was not known that they were still planning to build FWD CX-5. They just won't be selling them in the US.
 
Yes. AWD is important. It is why Subaru dominates snowy climates. Not having front wheel drive simplifies their supply chain which is also probably a factor.
 
I bought a new FWD CX-5 in 2018.
I likely would have NOT purchased the vehicle had I been forced to get the AWD version.

I wanted the better acceleration, shorter braking distance, better fuel economy, lighter weight, lower complexity/maintenance/repair and lower cost of the FWD version.
 
:
'16.5 CX-5 AWD
I bought my '16.5 new with AWD. I would not have bought a FWD version. My '15 AWD was a 1 y.o. lease return and I insisted on AWD for it.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
I haven't bought one yet, but I'm in the market, and it'll have no effect on me at all. I live in New England, there's not a single FWD CX-5 on a dealer lot within 250 miles of me (per Mazda's website) anyway.
It's fair to say northern dealers put few or none on their lots.
 
:
'20 Mazda CX-5 Sig
I bought a new FWD CX-5 in 2018.
I likely would have NOT purchased the vehicle had I been forced to get the AWD version.

I wanted the better acceleration, shorter braking distance, better fuel economy, lighter weight, lower complexity/maintenance/repair and lower cost of the FWD version.
What part of the country do you live in?
 
:
2019 CX-5 Touring
Since Mazda has made it known that the 2022 CX-5 will only be available in AWD, I was wondering if this was a good strategy. I have my doubts, but my opinion is just that. Please respond if you purchased your CX-5 new. The year does not matter.
I had a used 2 wheel drive CX-5 and the entire reason I bought a new one was to get one with AWD, but for recreational drives on unmaintained roads not for snow.
I've always found front wheel drive completely sufficient for snow on the roads here in Utah.


But my Utah dealer only stocks AWD and the salesperson said he didn't even know they made FWD so apparently FWD is not a desired option here.
 
Last edited:
:
2021 CX-5 GTR
And they sell cars for a living?
Know your product.
Quite common. When I bought my '21 GTR I traded in a '19 GT. Both are Machine Grey and the salesman said you can't tell the difference besides the badging. I mentioned the turbo models have larger front discs. He said he was not aware of this....
 
And they sell cars for a living?
Know your product.
Details can be looked up. Being able to sell is far more important than remembering every single important detail about a car when you have binders filled with literally everything anyone could possibly know in reach.
 
:
2019 Mazda CX-5 GT Reserve
Being able to sell is far more important than remembering every single important detail about a car
I agree that a salesperson may not know every minor detail about a vehicle. I do expect that as mentioned above that a salesperson selling a CUV which is Mazda's best selling product should know if said vehicle is available in FWD & AWD.

I, as a consumer with the same access to the internet as I would hope the salesperson has access to, should not be "schooling" the salesperson on the product they are selling. On numerous occasions I have had salespeople say "Gee, you know more about the vehicle than I do".

I have encountered both extremes in knowledge or lack thereof when dealing with vehicle salespeople & can only speak for myself but I know which salesperson I would rather discuss my purchase with.
 
I agree that a salesperson may not know every minor detail about a vehicle. I do expect that as mentioned above that a salesperson selling a CUV which is Mazda's best selling product should know if said vehicle is available in FWD & AWD.

I, as a consumer with the same access to the internet as I would hope the salesperson has access to, should not be "schooling" the salesperson on the product they are selling. On numerous occasions I have had salespeople say "Gee, you know more about the vehicle than I do".

I have encountered both extremes in knowledge or lack thereof when dealing with vehicle salespeople & can only speak for myself but I know which salesperson I would rather discuss my purchase with.
You as a buyer should know more about the cars you are looking at. Selling cars is hard as hell, and the effort involved in being an actual good one is gargantuan. Most dealers are lucky to get two or three really good sales people.
 
:
2019 CX-5 Signature
You as a buyer should know more about the cars you are looking at. ...
For enthusiasts like us, I agree. For the majority of the buying public, I disagree.

I just hope the sales people know enough to not try and find a FWD CX-5 next year. :)
 
:
2019 Mazda CX-5 GT Reserve
For enthusiasts like us, I agree. For the majority of the buying public, I disagree.

I just hope the sales people know enough to not try and find a FWD CX-5 next year. :)
Agreed.
I also enjoy testing the salesperson's knowledge by "playing dumb" & seeing how much misinformation I get. There's a big difference between a salesperson needing to check on something they're not sure of vs. being fed a load of nonsense.