Prices for a full brake job? 2018 CX-5

Jack Rabbit

Banned
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
Guess it depends on where your at...but like others have mentioned $860 seems high.

For me, it would cost anywhere from $400 to DIY to $600 for local mechanic...maybe even less if get part's cheaper.

Priced
$450 - Mazda OEM front & rear brakes pads and rotors. Only priced one site. May be able to get cheaper on another website.
$380 - Napa brakes and rotors
$ 00 - DIY
$210 - Local mechanic @$ 70 per hour

Did you try a few different garages?
 

madar

Contributor
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2016.5 CX 5 Touring AWD, 2015 SCION XB
I don’t think the OPs quote of $860 is that out of line. Parts are going to be about $300 and it will take 3-4 hours to complete. Labor rates are probably around $120-$150. Sure, if you diy you’ll save money because your labor is free, but most people can’t.



please tell us who this dealer is because this is one hell of a deal for pads and rotors installed. I’m a diyer, but I’d pay that. I don’t know how it can be true since hourly labor rates are around $150 at a dealer and parts are probably around $150. I’d guesstimate they will charge 1 hour per wheel.
He said rear brakes, he didn't mention rotors. Still a heck of a deal if he got the rotors cut and not replaced.
 

RL911

Member
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19 CX-5 touring
He said rear brakes, he didn't mention rotors. Still a heck of a deal if he got the rotors cut and not replaced.
I think you should read the first post again, he said rotors and pads for front and rear $860.
 

madar

Contributor
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2016.5 CX 5 Touring AWD, 2015 SCION XB
I think you should read the first post again, he said rotors and pads for front and rear $860.
I was replying to your post from this...

"I just had the rear brakes replaced on my 16 at the dealer and it was $204.00"
and your comment was....

"please tell us who this dealer is because this is one hell of a deal for pads and rotors installed."
 
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190683

Achilles Mazda here in Milton Ontario wanted $1500 for the brake on my 2011 Mazda cx7. Canadian Tire and Midas wanted $1300 each. I bought the parts from partsavatar, centric ceramic pads, rotors and hardware for $400 Canadian and then had my mechanic install everything for another $400.
I know the dealers are over priced for parts on every car. When I get my cx5 I will stick with other places to get parts
 
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2016.5 CX5 GT
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AWD w/ Tech pkg
My 2018 CX-5 has close to 60K on it. NJ Dealer says the rear brakes are shot and the fluid should be flushed. I passed on that because the dealer's work is shoddy, and I got a price from an independent shop to replace front and rear brakes and rotors, with a complete fluid flush for $860.00. They use Centric pads and rotors. Anyone had experience with that brand? And does the price seem fair?

Dealership in my area charges roughly $380-400 per end ... for rotors, pads, lube, fluid, and all the labor. (No caliper seals rebuild, though.) A little expensive, IMO, but it's in-and-out in about 2.5hrs. If I were to do it myself I'd save one-third on the parts, but I'd spend 4x the time getting it done. So, worth it to me.

Of course, there are a couple of small shops in town that advertise they can do brakes for about $200 and end. Haven't comparison shopped them, yet, to see what specific parts they have, which steps they'd do (or skip), etc.
 

Jack Rabbit

Banned
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
Dealership in my area charges roughly $380-400 per end ... for rotors, pads, lube, fluid, and all the labor. (No caliper seals rebuild, though.) A little expensive, IMO, but it's in-and-out in about 2.5hrs. If I were to do it myself I'd save one-third on the parts, but I'd spend 4x the time getting it done. So, worth it to me.

Of course, there are a couple of small shops in town that advertise they can do brakes for about $200 and end. Haven't comparison shopped them, yet, to see what specific parts they have, which steps they'd do (or skip), etc.
$200 is very possible...

Just make sure theyre not using cheapy pads and rotors.

When DIY(usually in summer), pay $100 per corner in part's for decent rotors/pads.

The few times I let garage change brakes is if it's winter or extremely busy at work.

My $100 per corner pads/rotors are then installed by my local mechanic for about $50 per corner labor.

So, I only pay $150 per corner using the good pads and rotors i want.

While our dealer labor prices are high(similar to national averages), our indy mechanics are reasonable(and regionally priced)

Now if the shop you mentioned is only using per corner, cheap $40 rotors & $ 5 pads and charging you $150 labor per corner then thats a NoGo.

Where you all live that labor prices so high? Major cities?

Did you think about driving 30 to 60 minutes out into the burbs or even the boons to get your work done?

I really can't imagine paying $800, $1000, or $1500 for a brake job.
I even DIY most of the time to save $200 in labor plus i enjoy brake changes.
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
Guess it depends on where your at...but like others have mentioned $860 seems high.

For me, it would cost anywhere from $400 to DIY to $600 for local mechanic...maybe even less if get part's cheaper.

Priced
$450 - Mazda OEM front & rear brakes pads and rotors. Only priced one site. May be able to get cheaper on another website.
$380 - Napa brakes and rotors
$ 00 - DIY
$210 - Local mechanic @$ 70 per hour

Did you try a few different garages?
when is the last time you priced labor at an independent shop? that $70/hr looks like it's from 10 years ago
 

Jack Rabbit

Banned
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
when is the last time you priced labor at an independent shop? that $70/hr looks like it's from 10 years ago
Lmao. Unlike the major cities, the burbs and boons have plenty of local mechanics. Prices are based on supply/demand. And many of us DIY out in these parts and do our own work. Back in the late 90's, I lived in metropolis an couldn't believe the labor rates. I would DIY or come back home for a fix rather than pay 100's per hour back then. Seems the city's have labor shortages and customers with plenty of excess cash $$$ that drives the labor rates up. Except for the dealers around here...they seem to price their labor at high national rates.

And the $150 per hour rates that dealers charge is more than most Doctors(except surgeons) charge and 7 times the average factory/service worker and 5 times what the average American(all combined) makes per hour. Think about that for a second. The dealer labor rates are out of whack. Of course, the mechanic gets very little of that , some to overhead but a large portion is kept by the dealers/owners. And $70 per hour for an Indy mechanic is $140,000 per year not a bad living
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
$200 is very possible...

Just make sure theyre not using cheapy pads and rotors.

When DIY(usually in summer), pay $100 per corner in part's for decent rotors/pads.

The few times I let garage change brakes is if it's winter or extremely busy at work.

My $100 per corner pads/rotors are then installed by my local mechanic for about $50 per corner labor.

So, I only pay $150 per corner using the good pads and rotors i want.

While our dealer labor prices are high(similar to national averages), our indy mechanics are reasonable(and regionally priced)

Now if the shop you mentioned is only using per corner, cheap $40 rotors & $ 5 pads and charging you $150 labor per corner then thats a NoGo.

Where you all live that labor prices so high? Major cities?

Did you think about driving 30 to 60 minutes out into the burbs or even the boons to get your work done?

I really can't imagine paying $800, $1000, or $1500 for a brake job.
I even DIY most of the time to save $200 in labor plus i enjoy brake changes.
I heard my local indy mechanic (who did my suspension work) tell someone that he charged $90.10 labor per axle for brake jobs. So it matches your mechanics $50 per corner labor. I like that he's a 5 minute walk away, puts on parts that I supply, and gets my car in and out quickly. So I make sure to slip him a few extra bucks for his good service. He also said it's not worth doing oil changes for the overall cost of time, labor and disposal. His shop, his rules.
 
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181962

The dealer labor rates are out of whack. Of course, the mechanic gets very little of that , some to overhead but a large portion is kept by the dealers/owners. And $70 per hour for an Indy mechanic is $140,000 per year not a bad living
So when you say "indy mechanic" you mean a guy working in his driveway who only accepts cash? LOL
 

Jack Rabbit

Banned
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
So when you say "indy mechanic" you mean a guy working in his driveway who only accepts cash? LOL
Lol. Nope. Alot of them work out of their family farm buildings or old block buildings that have been in family for years, use old vehicle pits and maybe a new highlift.
Very little overhead. Keep their ASE certifications to keep up with new vehicles and retain their state inspection station licenses. They probably keep portion of their mechanic employees pay for overhead. Everybody takes CC nowadays.
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
So when you say "indy mechanic" you mean a guy working in his driveway who only accepts cash? LOL

Dealership in my area charges roughly $380-400 per end ... for rotors, pads, lube, fluid, and all the labor. (No caliper seals rebuild, though.) A little expensive, IMO, but it's in-and-out in about 2.5hrs. If I were to do it myself I'd save one-third on the parts, but I'd spend 4x the time getting it done. So, worth it to me.

Of course, there are a couple of small shops in town that advertise they can do brakes for about $200 and end. Haven't comparison shopped them, yet, to see what specific parts they have, which steps they'd do (or skip), etc.
Actually, $380 -400 isn't horrible considering the dealer should be installing more expensive, good quality factory parts. They also have high overhead to cover. And they are very familiar with your car and special procedures that may be required. If I had to go that route I'd try to get them to include a system brake fluid flush or at least bleed the system free of charge. Can't hurt to ask. Sometimes it's worth paying a bit more for a job well done with good parts and you don't have to mess with it and importantly it gets done. No shame in that. Especially if you don't feel comfortable doing the job or lack the facilities/tool or time or experience.
Edited to add: regarding dealer prices. Depends on your dealer apparently. Before I hear anybody squawking about the $380 -400 quoted for GFrosty's brake job, let me mention that my dealer quoted me $450 to change the serpentine belt tensioner ( small item held on with a whopping one nut and one bolt) and the serpentine and water pump belts. I'd rather have new factory pads and rotors installed for the same price.
 
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yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
You don't NEED or HAVE TO bleed your brakes if you don't want to. It's your vehicle to treat however you choose. And I don't agree with some of the overly short recommended intervals such as BMW on a 2 year schedule. And others have their own intervals as well. I typically use 5 years max whether it coincides with replacing brakes or not. Sooner if it's convenient along with brakes.
All that aside, it's called preventive maintenance and has it's benefits for those of us that want our vehicles to last a long time and be reliable.
Regardless of your success in not bleeding or flushing brakes, here's a few points to consider:

1) Brake reservoirs are vented so a vacuum doesn't develop as the fluid level drops, so air does contact the fluid.
2) The calipers and wheel cylinders are the lowest point in the system where the (heavier than brake fluid) moisture and particles from seal wear accumulates. For those of us that actually bleed brakes, at least some of us have seen the nasty black fluid that comes out.
3) That moisture can cause corrosion to those close tolerance hydraulic valves in the ABS system valve block. In addition to ABS malfunctions they are expensive to replace, even as a reman unit. Some of those also have their own separate bleeder screw for a reason.
4) Caliper pistons. A caliper piston can rust from the inside and 'hang up'. The only thing retracting that piston back away from the pads is the piston seal returning to it's normal shape. It deforms under brake pressure as the piston extends and retracts the piston when it springs back to it's original shape. Think, when's the last time you've seen a retract spring inside a caliper?
5) Bleeding ensures that the bleeder screw has been periodically opened so that it is less likely to twist off from being corroded shut when trying to open for the first time in many years. Road salt has it's effect on this. I heard they salt the roads in Canada.

While on the subject of brakes, how about brake hoses. Inspecting those is part of performing a proper brake job. Looking for cracks and leakage. Road salt and hot climates can dry these out too. Those I'll change out if they are getting too stiff even if not leaking . Usually around the 11-12 year mark. Don't want to wait for the leak. I like a well functioning brake system. Stopping the car is more important than moving it.
I changed the brake fluid the first time after 20 years and 182K miles of the service on my 1998 Honda CR-V as brake fluid change isn’t listed in the maintenance schedule. The factory brake fluid coming out from the front calipers and rear cylinders was stil looked clear.

For some reason, many car manufactures including Mazda and Honda don’t recommend any brake fluid change in their maintenance schedule for US market, but they, Mazda and Honda, do recommend brake fluid change with 2-year interval in other regions.

No need to wonder whether or not we need to change the fluid in 2 years? 5 years? Or at each brake job? Just use brake fluid tester and change the brake fluid when the moisture level is reaching to 2%.


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RL911

Member
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19 CX-5 touring
I changed the brake fluid the first time after 20 years and 182K miles of the service on my 1998 Honda CR-V as brake fluid change isn’t listed in the maintenance schedule. The factory brake fluid coming out from the front calipers and rear cylinders was stil looked clear.

For some reason, many car manufactures including Mazda and Honda don’t recommend any brake fluid change in their maintenance schedule for US market, but they, Mazda and Honda, do recommend brake fluid change with 2-year interval in other regions.

No need to wonder whether or not we need to change the fluid in 2 years? 5 years? Or at each brake job? Just use brake fluid tester and change the brake fluid when the moisture level is reaching to 2%.


View attachment 314979
The manual for my 2019 honda Pilot says to change brake fluid every three years. I live in the US.
I cannot see how brake fluid coming out of your calipers could be clear after 20 years. Brake fluid turns brown naturally and gets darker and darker with age.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
The manual for my 2019 honda Pilot says to change brake fluid every three years. I live in the US.
I cannot see how brake fluid coming out of your calipers could be clear after 20 years. Brake fluid turns brown naturally and gets darker and darker with age.
Honda may have changed the brake fluid maintenance schedule in recent years, but not on my 1998 Honda CR-V and many other Honda’s I’ve touched.

Not like the old days, there’s nothing to rust in the brake system: the master cylinder、brake calipers、and brake cylinders are all made of aluminum alloy. The brake lines look like new as the car stays in Texas most of time.

Yes, the Honda factory brake fluid does look a bit darker than the fresh Honda OEM DOT3 brake fluid after 20 years, but it was still as clear as it could be coming out of the bleeders.
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
Honda may have changed the brake fluid maintenance schedule in recent years, but not on my 1998 Honda CR-V and many other Honda’s I’ve touched.

Not like the old days, there’s nothing to rust in the brake system: the master cylinder、brake calipers、and brake cylinders are all made of aluminum alloy. The brake lines look like new as the car stays in Texas most of time.

Yes, the Honda factory brake fluid does look a bit darker than the fresh Honda OEM DOT3 brake fluid after 20 years, but it was still as clear as it could be coming out of the bleeders.
Considering all of the brake reservoirs and fluid color I've seen through the years, I find it rather astounding your brake fluid is as you describe. My impression is that it's not rust so much but rather the carbon black used in the sliding seals that causes the dark /black fluid. Think how many times that master cylinder piston (with more than one seal) has traveled back and forth in it's bore. And master cylinders do wear out. I believe what you are saying but I'll still stick to my 5-6 year bleed/flush schedule and have to ponder this some more.
All right, since we're skirting the realm of the 'hard to believe' here, here's one for you. I've noticed various times in the past that bleeding my brakes using the Valvoline (Synpower?) partial synthetic, DOT 4 fluid gave a firmer pedal than DOT 3. I'm aware of the 'incompressibility' of liquids (though there is a tiny amount) but still noticed it enough to use that fluid as much as possible. Maybe it's all in my head and about as scientific as the 'butt dyno' but sometimes you have to wonder.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Considering all of the brake reservoirs and fluid color I've seen through the years, I find it rather astounding your brake fluid is as you describe. My impression is that it's not rust so much but rather the carbon black used in the sliding seals that causes the dark /black fluid. Think how many times that master cylinder piston (with more than one seal) has traveled back and forth in it's bore. And master cylinders do wear out. I believe what you are saying but I'll still stick to my 5-6 year bleed/flush schedule and have to ponder this some more.
All right, since we're skirting the realm of the 'hard to believe' here, here's one for you. I've noticed various times in the past that bleeding my brakes using the Valvoline (Synpower?) partial synthetic, DOT 4 fluid gave a firmer pedal than DOT 3. I'm aware of the 'incompressibility' of liquids (though there is a tiny amount) but still noticed it enough to use that fluid as much as possible. Maybe it's all in my head and about as scientific as the 'butt dyno' but sometimes you have to wonder.
When I bleeded the brake fluid off my 1974 Chevy Impala and 1974 AMC Hornet in very early years, I did see the rust-colored brake fluid coming out of the cylinders during initial bleeding process. Of course the brake cylinders are made of steel at the time.

I actually was surprised to see clear brake fluid coming out initially during the bleeding on my 1998 Honda CR-V. So far the master cylinder、front calipers、and rear cylinders are still original at 190K miles. I believe either Honda has used very reliable some special seals inside of master cylinder、calipers、and cylinders, or some long-life special brake fluid, so that your “carbon black” contamination to the brake fluid didn’t occur.

Like I said, I won’t be worried about 2-year、5-year、or 20-year brake fluid change schedule. Just trust the tester and change the brake fluid whenever it says 2% on moisture level.
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
When I bleeded the brake fluid off my 1974 Chevy Impala and 1974 AMC Hornet in very early years, I did see the rust-colored brake fluid coming out of the cylinders during initial bleeding process. Of course the brake cylinders are made of steel at the time.

I actually was surprised to see clear brake fluid coming out initially during the bleeding on my 1998 Honda CR-V. So far the master cylinder、front calipers、and rear cylinders are still original at 190K miles. I believe either Honda has used very reliable some special seals inside of master cylinder、calipers、and cylinders, or some long-life special brake fluid, so that your “carbon black” contamination to the brake fluid didn’t occur.

Like I said, I won’t be worried about 2-year、5-year、or 20-year brake fluid change schedule. Just trust the tester and change the brake fluid whenever it says 2% on moisture level.
Gotcha!
 
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Cx5
Had to get a new key fob programmed today at the dealer. Mechanic said front brakes need to be done: new pads and turn rotors @ $384. Told service advisor I can do all 4 sides with pads and new centric rotors for $350 at home. Needless to say, I said no thank you. Lol