Prices for a full brake job, 2018 CX-5

My 2018 CX-5 has close to 60K on it. NJ Dealer says the rear brakes are shot and the fluid should be flushed. I passed on that because the dealer's work is shoddy, and I got a price from an independent shop to replace front and rear brakes and rotors, with a complete fluid flush for $860.00. They use Centric pads and rotors. Anyone had experience with that brand? And does the price seem fair?
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
I just had the rear brakes replaced on my 16 at the dealer and it was $204.00. I didn't need fronts yet but I'd estimate they'd be no more than $280.00 at the most.
I wouldn't do any flushes, just drain and fill. Dealer trying to empty your wallet.

At 60k you only need oil and possibly tranny fluid drain/fill. Possibly rear diff fluid change but probably not. Follow the owners manual for maintenance not dealer.
 

CarpeDiem

Under Pressure
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Superstitions
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2021 CE Turbo
While some “Centric pads and rotors” may be more expensive than EOM (depends on the exact quality level of the parts used) the $860 for the whole package does seem on the high side, but that really depends on the market and the quality of the work. Which pads and rotors were the shop going to use? I love it when someone who knows nothing about the specifics of someone else’s vehicle tells them ‘what they need’. Is the OP the original owner? Was the brake fluid ever replaced/added to? With what? Can the factory maintenance schedule see that the diff fluid is contaminated, burnt or full of metal particles? Premium fluid isn’t cheap, but depending on where the OP lives and the condition of the brake fluid a complete flush may be a very good idea.

Going cheap on something as important as brakes is a fool’s errand. Which is “cheaper”, an additional $300 in maintenance - or being injured (or injuring someone else) in an accident? Hope is a very poor strategy.…
 

clownshoes2

2017 CX-5 GT No Tech
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CX-5
I know I'm going to be going to a reputable garage for my brakes rather than the dealer. My rears were about $600 for new pads and rotors. eff that.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
My 2018 CX-5 has close to 60K on it. NJ Dealer says the rear brakes are shot and the fluid should be flushed. I passed on that because the dealer's work is shoddy, and I got a price from an independent shop to replace front and rear brakes and rotors, with a complete fluid flush for $860.00. They use Centric pads and rotors. Anyone had experience with that brand? And does the price seem fair?

Centric makes a lot of brake rotors and brake pads with varying levels of stopping power, brake dust prevention and rust prevention. Nobody can say that your quoted price is "worth it" without knowing the exact rotors and pads being used. If you had exact part numbers, you could look part prices up to compare, and then make an educated decision on whether or not it is fair, vs. whether or not it "seems" fair.

If I had to guess, I'd say the price is high. Even if it was $860 CAD I'd probably still say it's a little high, but only because if I priced out the cheapest Centric rotors and pads from RockAuto.com and then had them shipped to me, I would be paying about $400 for pads, rotors and shipping (shipping is an extra $185, ooof). This doesn't include labor or brake fluid. On the other hand, if I bought the cheapest Centric pads and rotors locally, I could probably get the same components for 200-260. Then just add brake fluid and labour to likely come out around $500-600 CAD ($375-450 USD). Again, this is with the cheapest Centric components available on RockAuto.

To answer one of your questions, Centric is a good brand.
 
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2014 Mazda3 S GT auto, 2008 MX5 6-speed
Your brake fluid should be replaced at every brake job (in the least). Back 20 years ago, a brake flush was $30. It's very easy, especially if the shop has a pressurized master cylinder tool. And unless the rotor thickness was measured, how could the Indy shop say that they need to be replaced? Each rotor should have a minimum thickness stamped or etched into it.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
Your brake fluid should be replaced at every brake job (in the least).
Say what? Where did that come from? Personal preference?
I've searched this many times, and no two sites say the same thing. Some recommend as often as every two years or 30,000 miles, while others state the opposite: don't bother with it at all, it's unnecessary....and then everything in between. Two years, three years, 5 years, 30,000 miles, 40,000 miles, 60,000 miles. On and on it goes.
This is me: I've been driving for over 55 years, and have never done a brake fluid flush on any car I've ever owned. I keep my cars a long time, usually ten years or more, and have never had issues beyond normal brake maintenance. I just don't see the point in doing this every two years, but hey, to each their own.
 
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2014 Mazda3 S GT auto, 2008 MX5 6-speed
Say what? Where did that come from? Personal preference?
I've searched this many times, and no two sites say the same thing. Some recommend as often as every two years or 30,000 miles, while others state the opposite: don't bother with it at all, it's unnecessary....and then everything in between. Two years, three years, 5 years, 30,000 miles, 40,000 miles, 60,000 miles. On and on it goes.
This is me: I've been driving for over 55 years, and have never done a brake fluid flush on any car I've ever owned. I keep my cars a long time, usually ten years or more, and have never had issues beyond normal brake maintenance. I just don't see the point in doing this every two years, but hey, to each their own.
Of course, if you drive 20,000 miles per year (mostly highway), you can have the fluid replaced every other brake pad change. Brake fluid absorbs moisture over time, even while in an often-closed system. I have done may fluid changes over the last 49 years and you can see the color change as the moisture content increases. As you brake pads wear down, more fluid is extracted from the reservoir to replace the void. You would then open the reservoir to replenish the fluid. The reservoir is exposed to air which has moisture in it.
Look at it this way, the brakes have to be bled, anyway when you have a brake job. For an extra $50 or less, you can have all of the fluid replaced. Synthetic oil is often claimed to be good for 15,000 miles. Is that when you change your oil and filter?
Don't believe that brake fluid or transmission fluid will last forever.
 

madar

Contributor
:
2016.5 CX 5 Touring AWD, 2015 SCION XB
Realistically if you're not doing it yourself in today's price market, that's not a bad price. Two years ago it would've been outrageous. I priced rear brakes and rotors 7 years ago from a dealer and it was $300 and change. Last year the same dealer wanted $475. It's the new world pricing. Independent shops were a little cheaper but even they got more expensive.

Centric rotors are a favorite of mine combined with Akebono brakes. There's quality in both names. Front and rear total brakes and a fluid flush, that's not a bad price...in today's market
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
While some “Centric pads and rotors” may be more expensive than EOM (depends on the exact quality level of the parts used) the $860 for the whole package does seem on the high side, but that really depends on the market and the quality of the work. Which pads and rotors were the shop going to use? I love it when someone who knows nothing about the specifics of someone else’s vehicle tells them ‘what they need’. Is the OP the original owner? Was the brake fluid ever replaced/added to? With what? Can the factory maintenance schedule see that the diff fluid is contaminated, burnt or full of metal particles? Premium fluid isn’t cheap, but depending on where the OP lives and the condition of the brake fluid a complete flush may be a very good idea.

Going cheap on something as important as brakes is a fool’s errand. Which is “cheaper”, an additional $300 in maintenance - or being injured (or injuring someone else) in an accident? Hope is a very poor strategy.…
When OP said "Complete Fluid Flush" thought he was refering to all fluids not brake fluid.
In that case brake fluid should be replaced at every brake job.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
Look at it this way, the brakes have to be bled, anyway when you have a brake job. For an extra $50 or less, you can have all of the fluid replaced. Synthetic oil is often claimed to be good for 15,000 miles. Is that when you change your oil and filter?
Don't believe that brake fluid or transmission fluid will last forever.
Again, say what? Why would I need to bleed my brakes on a pad and rotor replacement?
I've never needed to bleed my brakes when replacing pads/shoes. If done properly, the system stays closed. If replacing or repairing calipers, then that's a different matter.

As for oil changes, I do them earlier than most, only because I don't drive much anymore (21,000 miles in five years), and will never hit the recommended mileage interval.
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
Again, say what? Why would I need to bleed my brakes on a pad and rotor replacement?
I've never needed to bleed my brakes when replacing pads/shoes. If done properly, the system stays closed. If replacing or repairing calipers, then that's a different matter.

As for oil changes, I do them earlier than most, only because I don't drive much anymore (21,000 miles in five years), and will never hit the recommended mileage interval.

You don't NEED or HAVE TO bleed your brakes if you don't want to. It's your vehicle to treat however you choose. And I don't agree with some of the overly short recommended intervals such as BMW on a 2 year schedule. And others have their own intervals as well. I typically use 5 years max whether it coincides with replacing brakes or not. Sooner if it's convenient along with brakes.
All that aside, it's called preventive maintenance and has it's benefits for those of us that want our vehicles to last a long time and be reliable.
Regardless of your success in not bleeding or flushing brakes, here's a few points to consider:

1) Brake reservoirs are vented so a vacuum doesn't develop as the fluid level drops, so air does contact the fluid.
2) The calipers and wheel cylinders are the lowest point in the system where the (heavier than brake fluid) moisture and particles from seal wear accumulates. For those of us that actually bleed brakes, at least some of us have seen the nasty black fluid that comes out.
3) That moisture can cause corrosion to those close tolerance hydraulic valves in the ABS system valve block. In addition to ABS malfunctions they are expensive to replace, even as a reman unit. Some of those also have their own separate bleeder screw for a reason.
4) Caliper pistons. A caliper piston can rust from the inside and 'hang up'. The only thing retracting that piston back away from the pads is the piston seal returning to it's normal shape. It deforms under brake pressure as the piston extends and retracts the piston when it springs back to it's original shape. Think, when's the last time you've seen a retract spring inside a caliper?
5) Bleeding ensures that the bleeder screw has been periodically opened so that it is less likely to twist off from being corroded shut when trying to open for the first time in many years. Road salt has it's effect on this. I heard they salt the roads in Canada.

While on the subject of brakes, how about brake hoses. Inspecting those is part of performing a proper brake job. Looking for cracks and leakage. Road salt and hot climates can dry these out too. Those I'll change out if they are getting too stiff even if not leaking . Usually around the 11-12 year mark. Don't want to wait for the leak. I like a well functioning brake system. Stopping the car is more important than moving it.