Poll MRCC vs. Regular cruise control

MRCC or Regular cruise control, which do you prefer?

  • MRCC

  • Regular cruise control


Results are only viewable after voting.
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2019 cx-5 signature. 2019 cx-3 awd touring
So I’ve noticed there are a few drivers out there who prefer using the regular cruise control function as opposed to the MRCC.

Just trying to gauge the reasons they prefer this to MRCC?

To me I feel MRCC performs very well and allows the driver to feel a lot less fatigued when driving long distances. Also allows the car to come to a full stop, especially useful in stop and go traffic scenarios.
 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
For me MRCC. I see it as a stepping stone to autonomous driving and so using it is helping advances in that direction. Like all new technology, it has it's quirks and behaviors but overall it is reliable and helpful for my driving needs.
 
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2019 CX-5 Signature
I can't see any reason someone would prefer the old system. I miss this feature every time I take my Lexus on the highway.
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
I like the MRCC on my CX-9. I've used it quite often on road trips and even in the city. I think some people don't like how it automatically brakes for you when you're approaching a car in front of you, but it's easy enough for me to hit the Mode/Off button (if I need to brake because there's no room to move over), or just accelerate to override the MRCC. As long as you maintain the throttle input manually and don't follow too closely to the car in front (you can configure this setting as well), the emergency braking system and MRCC should let you do what you want to do. Most of the time I just hit the Off button, accelerate to get around, then hit the Resume button.

With that said, this may not work for drivers who like to tailgate.
 
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Chicagoland
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2019 CX-5 GT-R
MRCC makes cruise control actually usable when other cars are on the road. Traditional cruise control becomes useless when there is any amount of traffic or the car in front of you isn't maintaining a consistent speed. I also feel like MRCC is an added safety measure since it will detect the lead car slowing down before I would notice and it locks in a safe following distance.
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
MRCC by a mile. I have nerve compression in my right foot (bio-mechanical) so less right foot pressure on the accelerator/brake pedal is a plus for me.
 
I use MRCC regularly in my 2019 GTR for many of the reasons mentioned. I do have a major frustration with the conservative distance it keeps with the car ahead of me - even at the shortest distance setting. The excessive gap invites cars from the other lanes to cut in front of me and I effectively move backwards as MRCC repositions against the new vehicle in front of me. So as one responder above mentioned, I manually accelerate to close the distance but that kind of defeats the purpose - but I do it anyway.

I sense after reading the owner's manual and struggling to get through the endless warnings in italics that Mazda terrified of getting sued and for the same reason made the MRCC overly conservative. It could be so much better.
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
The only annoying thing I noticed on a 300 mile trip last week was when you come to a complete stop at a traffic light and the light turns green then you hit resume the system waits a few seconds before moving. If I was driving I would start accelerating as soon as the car in front of me starts moving. It may be the way I have the distance between cars set. I'll try reducing it the next time and see what happens.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
So far, I'm the lone dissenter in preferring conventional cruise. Some may not want to be accused of being a Luddite. I have no such compunctions.

First of all, I would not use any cruise in congested traffic, or on hilly, twisty, wet or snowy roads as any manual would advise.

I've tested MRCC and it seems to work as advertised. However, I've seen enough false negatives and positives from the other driver assist functions to not trust it entirely. Of course it is the false negatives you have to worry about especially at 70 mph. So I do what I've always done--more gas or "+" to accelerate; "-" or cancel to decelerate, or brake if necessary.

The warnings in the manual are not to be taken lightly. Besides the risks associated with any cruise there's the matters of fog, precipitation or even darkness inhibiting camera functions. The inconsistent performance of lane keeping during my testing, a camera driven function mysteriously failing at times to recognize clearly marked lane lines in perfect weather, gives me pause.

The industry has to date oversold and underdelivered on the error rates associated autonomous or semi-autonomous functions, encouraging a false sense of complacency. Whatever you do, vigilance, eyes on the road and hands on the wheel are your most important safety features.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
For me MRCC. I see it as a stepping stone to autonomous driving and so using it is helping advances in that direction.
I'm not sure how using it helps to advance it unless you get in a wreck with an injury or fatality leading to a thorough investigation that concludes a system fault was a contributing factor.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
The only annoying thing I noticed on a 300 mile trip last week was when you come to a complete stop at a traffic light and the light turns green then you hit resume the system waits a few seconds before moving. If I was driving I would start accelerating as soon as the car in front of me starts moving. It may be the way I have the distance between cars set. I'll try reducing it the next time and see what happens.
It's cruise control, not an autonomous driving feature. I really don't think you should be using cruise control in stop and go traffic, at least not with the Mazda system. Sorry. It's meant for highway driving.
Having said that, I can't think of any situation where I've used regular cruise control since getting the Mazda five years ago. It has the ability to toggle between adaptive Cruise control, and "regular" cruise control, but I always use the adaptive setting. I also adjust/play with the distance setting, depending on traffic.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
So far, I'm the lone dissenter in preferring conventional cruise. Some may not want to be accused of being a Luddite. I have no such compunctions.

First of all, I would not use any cruise in congested traffic, or on hilly, twisty, wet or snowy roads as any manual would advise.

I've tested MRCC and it seems to work as advertised. However, I've seen enough false negatives and positives from the other driver assist functions to not trust it entirely. Of course it is the false negatives you have to worry about especially at 70 mph. So I do what I've always done--more gas or "+" to accelerate; "-" or cancel to decelerate, or brake if necessary.
So, the MRCC works as advertised, but you won't use it because some "other" features have given you false positives? That's like saying I don't swim in pools because people have been bitten by sharks while swimming in the ocean.

I have had one or two funny incidents with lane keep assist and emergency braking, but in five years, I have never had a single negative experience with adaptive cruise control. Give it a chance.
 
Traffic jam assist is the next step. I use it all the time. It's a bit aggressive on acceleration and decel for my taste though. That being said my one big gripe is when cars get in your lane it takes a second before it notices then brakes really hard.
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
It's cruise control, not an autonomous driving feature. I really don't think you should be using cruise control in stop and go traffic, at least not with the Mazda system. Sorry. It's meant for highway driving.
Having said that, I can't think of any situation where I've used regular cruise control since getting the Mazda five years ago. It has the ability to toggle between adaptive Cruise control, and "regular" cruise control, but I always use the adaptive setting. I also adjust/play with the distance setting, depending on traffic.
Nobody said it was "autonomous driving". It's a tool, my eyes are on the road and my feet are ready to apply braking if needed to override the system. By the way it is highway driving, I wouldn't use it in town or adjoining areas. It was Rt 13 through DE, MD, VA and NC. That's basically a highway.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
So, the MRCC works as advertised, but you won't use it because some "other" features have given you false positives? That's like saying I don't swim in pools because people have been bitten by sharks while swimming in the ocean.

I have had one or two funny incidents with lane keep assist and emergency braking, but in five years, I have never had a single negative experience with adaptive cruise control. Give it a chance.
I said it "seems" to work as advertised in "my testing". It should be obvious that such testing is limited and could not possibly cover the myriad variables one may encounter.

Analogies are like opinions--everybody has one. ;) If you avoid the ocean because you can't swim then you should avoid the deep end of the pool.

Now, if you have had funny things happen with emergency braking you should be aware those functions use the same hardware as MRCC--front facing camera and radar. While the software may be different the inputs are not.
 
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2014 Ford Explorer Sport, 2009 CX9(Wife's)
I don't have MRCC specifically (I don't currently have a Mazda), but my previous VW Golf R and current Ford Edge have radar cruise control.

It took a little time to get used to the radar CC, but after using it and then jumping into my other vehicle that has regular, I really miss the radar.

My biggest gripe in both vehicles is that it sees vehicles that are exiting and slows down for way too long. I'd say the R was much more aggressive with slowing down way too much. I've gotten used to resting my foot on the throttle to maintain speed.
 

SimpleCanuck

2022 Mazda CX-5 GS AWD - Snowflake White Pearl
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Ottawa, ON, CA
I was certainly thankful for the radar cruise when I recently did an 1800km (1100 miles) road trip, on mostly 2-lane highways. It made the drive more enjoyable and less tiring. I don't use it in heavy traffic or inclement weather.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
I said it "seems" to work as advertised in "my testing". It should be obvious that such testing is limited and could not possibly cover the myriad variables one may encounter.

Analogies are like opinions--everybody has one. ;) If you avoid the ocean because you can't swim then you should avoid the deep end of the pool.

Now, if you have had funny things happen with emergency braking you should be aware those functions use the same hardware as MRCC--front facing camera and radar. While the software may be different the inputs are not.
The two or three times (in 5 years) that I've had funny things happening with emergency braking (over aggressiveness mostly), it had nothing to do with cruise control. In fact I wasn't using cruise control in any of those situations.
After five years of using adaptive cruise control, I'm pretty sure I've driven in a myriad of situations with a myriad of variables, with zero issues. Maybe it's because I don't use cruise control in stupid situations, like in city stop and go traffic for example.
If you use it properly, in a safe and reasonable way, while understanding it's limitations, then you won't have a problem.