I appreciate my CX-5 more after seeing the cost cutting on the CX-50

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2019 CX-5 AWD

"Although Mazda is still keeping plenty of the specifics about the 2023 CX-50, its most rugged SUV, under wraps, Mazda engineer Dave Coleman provided plenty of information to give us a much better idea of the size of the vehicle and what it's based on. Generally speaking, it's bigger than the existing CX-5, and it's more capable.

The CX-50 is based on the same basic platform as the Mazda3 and CX-30. And that extends to the suspension design of MacPherson struts up front and a torsion beam at the rear. This is because this platform was designed with the torsion beam in mind, and Coleman and Mazda contend that this suspension design was used to keep vehicle motions simple and natural-feeling."

I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that a torsion beam is much cheaper and faster to produce and install.

independent rear suspension.jpg


independent rear suspension 2.jpg


I think the styling is very good and the vehicle overall looks good. This is just something I am particular about as a car nerd.
 
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sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
I think the styling is very good and the vehicle overall looks good. This is just something I am particular about as a car nerd.

Have you test driven a new Mazda3/CX-30 and compared the ride over an imperfect road to your CX-5? I haven't had the chance yet. It seems that quite a few auto journalists (blogs, YouTube channels, etc.) have commented that the ride is either unchanged or slightly better. I have seen one article that actually said the ride was worse in the new Mazda3 compared to the previous model. Of course, all of these sources have someone in their pockets, so I always take what I read and hear with a grain of salt.

IMO the primary reason for the switch is indeed cost-cutting, and a distant second would be packaging/cargo room improvement.
 

Antoine

Administrator
I’ve read that torsion beam’s advantages are more interior space and a simple solid design that may be easier and less costly to maintain…I wonder if it’s more durable as well..?

You’ve got to imagine that Mazda puts a tremendous amount of time and energy into deciding what systems/designs/technology to use in each model and that while there may be cost savings in one area, those savings are in fact being reinvested and better utilized elsewhere in the vehicle.

The CX-50 is being presented as a more rugged model than the CX-5, perhaps it makes a lot of sense why they chose what they chose.
 

7eregrine

The man, the myth, the legend
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Land of Cleve
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2016.5 CX5
It shows how dim-witted the American public is. These manufacturers must slap on all of this tacky cladding so consumers can feel tough and rugged while driving to Costco.
Totally disagree with this. What a ridiculous statement. The CX-30 is way worse with the cladding and is sold globally. The CX-50, exclusively North America (which includes Canada BTW) has LESS cladding the the 30. So I'd say we actually DON'T like it.
The 'cladding' we shall call it is UNIVERSALLY PANNED by nearly everyone.
So... not sure why you choose CLADDING being an American thing.
ALL Car companies are trying to make the SUV's more rugged looking. Have you seen the new RAV4? Which the 50 reminds me of greatly. The Cherokee redesign?
It's the sheep mentality of the car companies following what the other guy does more then what the consumer is demanding.
 

bluegrass

Banned
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SUV
Totally disagree with this. What a ridiculous statement. The CX-30 is way worse with the cladding and is sold globally. The CX-50, exclusively North America (which includes Canada BTW) has LESS cladding the the 30. So I'd say we actually DON'T like it.
The 'cladding' we shall call it is UNIVERSALLY PANNED by nearly everyone.
So... not sure why you choose CLADDING being an American thing.
ALL Car companies are trying to make the SUV's more rugged looking.
It's the sheep mentality of the car companies following what the other guy does more then what the consumer is demanding.
I don't follow global trends. But I can tell you that consumers in the US are increasingly drawn to the idea of 'rugged', 'tough', 'off-road capable' vehicles...even though 99.5% will never take them off pavement.

Manufacturers are meeting this faux tough-look demand by adding chunky black plastic, fake silver plastic "skid plates", aggressive fascias, ect. They just need to look tough (not actually function) because consumers only care about having a rugged appearance/persona.

This is why you're seeing such trends proliferate. If these tacky add-ons were "universally panned" by consumers, then they wouldn't continue buying them in increasingly large numbers.
 

7eregrine

The man, the myth, the legend
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Land of Cleve
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2016.5 CX5
This is why you're seeing such trends proliferate. If these tacky add-ons were "universally panned" by consumers, then they wouldn't continue buying them in increasingly large numbers.

Disagree... again.
"I don't follow global trends" isn't a good response to the fact that the 30 has WAY more cladding and it's a global car. So it's certainly not only Americans by your reasoning. And in fact the 50 has LESS cladding so maybe Americans actually prefer LESS cladding?
Your own logic here.
The Chevy Blazer has quickly become a top seller in this segment. Have you seen one?
No very 'cladded' at all.

One of the top reasons people buy cars today is "Brand Loyalty". So that guy that ONLY BUYS TOYTOA is buying the RAV4 whether it looks 'off roady' or not.
You think, on average, women care about "off roadiness"? I doubt even a majority of men care that it looks off roady. And, as the Blazer shows, you can look good sans clad.
The fact that Mazda is reducing the clad tells me they have heard the MANY complaints about too much plastic on the 30.

Sorry, I just give most consumers more credit and don't like stereotypes. Most people are well aware that they aren't going off roading in their car but choose to buy it for other reasons. Mazdas current rise to prominence, which started in 2015-2016... has nothing to do with looking 'off roady'.

/edit/ If anything, Mazda follows others with many of these design changes. Particularly Ford and Chevy. ;) Notice the Escape had the chrome edge on only part of the windows before Mazda did in 2017. And look at that Trailblazer...
 
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Pueblo county CO
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CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
I'm amazed at how much plastic goes into new cars. The entire front and rear bumper assemblies are plastic. It doesn't surprise me.
 

bluegrass

Banned
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SUV
the fact that the 30 has WAY more cladding and it's a global car. So it's certainly not only Americans by your reasoning. And in fact the 50 has LESS cladding so maybe Americans actually prefer LESS cladding?
The CX-30 has way more cladding than the CX-3 it replaced.
The CX-50 has way more cladding than the CX-5 it will eventually replace.
Do you see the trend here? I also don't agree the 50 has less total area of cladding (it is just a much larger vehicle, and broken up by the faux silver "skid plates" & fake intake/exhaust openings, ect).

The Chevy Blazer has quickly become a top seller in this segment. Have you seen one?
No very 'cladded' at all.
The Blazer is a really bad example. It is absolutely not "quickly becoming a top seller" in its segment...go look at the sales figures compared to other models.
Secondly, people in the industry (Doug Demuro for one) have said Chevy screwed up by turning the Blazer into a wannabe Camaro SUV, instead of returning to its rugged roots (like Ford has done with the Bronco).
Lastly, there is still a bunch of black cladding on the Blazer. I don't know how you missed it... at least 6" around the entire vehicle and extending at least 12" up the tailgate.

You think, on average, women care about "off roadiness"? I doubt even a majority of men care that it looks off roady.
I'm not sure where you live, but it appears to be in a bubble. I see a huge number of women driving Jeeps, Ford Bronco Sports, Toyota 4Runners, ect. Jeep even makes the Wrangler in a HOT PINK exterior paint color!
 
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2018 AWD GT Premium Red/Black
The overall design looks good, but all of that black plastic body cladding and fake silver skid plates look hideous.

It shows how dim-witted the American public is. These manufacturers must slap on all of this tacky cladding so consumers can feel tough and rugged while driving to Costco.
I don't mind black plastic cladding so much - just depends on the context and the design. It's utilitarian and not a chintzy fake addition.

I severely hate the fake silver/metallic skid plates. I just don't get that at all.
 
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2019 CX-5 Signature
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One of the top reasons people buy cars today is "Brand Loyalty". So that guy that ONLY BUYS TOYTOA is buying the RAV4 whether it looks 'off roady' or not.
...
I definitely don't fit that mold. :) My last 6 new vehicle purchases as follows:
Chevy
Hyundai
Honda
Lexus
Mazda
Ford

As far as all this cladding talk goes. The '22 CX-5 has none, from what I remember. The cladding around the wheels on the previous gens, is now painted to match the vehicle.
 
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2021 CX-5 GS
I'm ok with using plastic in areas that get dinged up very easily. IE: rear and front bumpers. The CX-30, which was on my shortlist, had a bit too much on the sides. They needed to cut it in half.

I think the CX-50 looks fine.
 

bluegrass

Banned
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SUV
Sorry, I just give most consumers more credit and don't like stereotypes. Most people are well aware that they aren't going off roading in their car but choose to buy it for other reasons.
For many, it absolutely has to do with looking 'off roady.'
Take the Toyota 4Runner for example. It is an ancient, unrefined, body-on-frame SUV that hasn't had a significant update in over a decade. Yet it is enjoying it's best ever sales, due in large part to it's tough looks and outdoorsy image.

"Whether you want to admit it or not, sometimes the vehicle people choose to buy is based on the image that goes along with it. This goes for many platforms like German sedans, diesel trucks, and exotic sports cars.
Owning a 4runner comes with a certain adventurous image. Much like the Jeep Wrangler, owning one is more of a lifestyle for many people. It looks tough and everyone is familiar with its off-road prowess.
Pulling up in a 4runner tells the world that your life is exciting – or at least that’s what some owners like to believe. The unfortunate thing is that much like many other rugged vehicles on the market, the majority of Toyota 4runners will never be taken off-road. People just love the feeling of being able to go anywhere in any condition, even if they only take it to soccer practice and the shopping mall in reality."
 
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18 Mazda CX5 AW
I don't mind black plastic cladding so much - just depends on the context and the design. It's utilitarian and not a chintzy fake addition.

I severely hate the fake silver/metallic skid plates. I just don't get that at all.
Yeah the fake skid plates are just wrong.

As one who has had car frames and body's rust out, the plastic cladding actually serves a utilitarian purpose of less lower to road areas exposed to salt/rust if they only use plastic and don't cover over the metal.
However too much/high up looks horrible on the vehicle.. and the should definitely make all rockers plastic/rubber.
 
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HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
Independent rear suspension is superior on paper, but I would not be too quick to judge.

See the following video of the CX-30 with the rear torsion beam suspension being taken through it's paces. Note that much of this video is in slo mo; the driver is at times exceeding 100 kmh (62 mph) and running above 6 on the tach--keep an eye on the gauges. He must be manual shifting revving high in lower gears.

Note the red line above 7. I'm guessing the US CX-30 normally aspirated does not red line above 7,000 RPM so this European tach looks to be incremented a little differently. I assume the "180" in the title indicates the European HP measurement. Please correct me if I'm wrong.


That CX-30 looks pretty competent. When it comes to comparing CX-5 vs. CX-50, the proof is in the pudding. However, a personal comparison in test drives at a dealer are not going to be possible. Maybe ripping one turn before the salesman freaks, lol.

So, one would have to rely on the reviewers--skid pad and subjective impressions of body roll, understeer/oversteer, ride comfort in daily driving, off-road competency, etc. So, how different are they, and what are the other tradeoffs (if there is a handling tradeoff) that favors the 50--it's a little bigger, beefed up body construction, etc? And what is the price difference relative to the tradeoffs?

I think you'd have to put the difference in handling (if there is one) above all other considerations to simply write off the 50. Of course it's possible Mazda bungled something in the 50 and it drives terribly with all bets off, but that's doubtful.
 
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7eregrine

The man, the myth, the legend
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Land of Cleve
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2016.5 CX5
"Whether you want to admit it or not, sometimes the vehicle people choose to buy is based on the image that goes along with it. This goes for many platforms like German sedans, diesel trucks, and exotic sports cars.
I just don't believe people are buying SUV's... to project an image. A German sedan? Sure. An Exotic sports car? Sure. A... 4Runner? Not so much.

Owning a 4runner comes with a certain adventurous image. Much like the Jeep Wrangler, owning one is more of a lifestyle for many people. It looks tough and everyone is familiar with its off-road prowess.
Pulling up in a 4runner tells the world that your life is exciting – or at least that’s what some owners like to believe.
See... this is where I disagree. I don't believe this is what someone thinks when they are buying a 4Runner. The reason my co-worker bought a Traverse? "I like boxier SUV's". Yes, I actually polled my 40 co-workers on this a few years back. No one said "It's outdoorsy looking".
People just love the feeling of being able to go anywhere in any condition, even if they only take it to soccer practice and the shopping mall in reality."
Yea, I don't buy this either. When someone in Cleveland, Ohio buys an AWD SUV... it's to get of of the driveway without issue. Or to make the 40 mile commute downtown during a blizzard. Most people aren't all "well, I could take this down the back roads if I wanted to!

I won't disagree about the Wrangler either, especially the older ones. THose people are just crazy. :D