FORScan Lite OBD Scanner

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2003 Sunlight Silver Mazda Proteg5
Wanted to share an extremely helpful resource not just for our cars, but other Mazda and Ford vehicles.

FORScan Lite for iOS, and Android, is a gem I stumbled across a couple months ago while looking for an app to match my ELM327 WiFi scanner.

Found this app extremity helpful in diagnosing a bad ECT as I was able to directly access the sensor voltage PID. Also, I was able to access the cooling fan PIDs to see if they were being commanded ON/OFF by the ECU.


Furthermore, I can also test IAC valve and monitor: alternator output voltage and other sensor voltages such as MAP, MAF.

Oh...and I can also access ABS codes.

I don’t know if Torque for Android can do this too but this app is a hella of a lot better and cheaper than other basic OBD II apps.

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pcb

The Diagram Dude
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2002 MP5
I decided to go with the demo version.

I'll leave the demo version on my phone until I need the full version....
I'll figure it out then...

Did you have any symptoms when your ECT was faulty ???
 
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2003 Sunlight Silver Mazda Proteg5
The cooling fan would not turn on after I stopped to wait for a train to cross. Waited for about 10 minutes.

When I read through the FSM, I found sensor voltage is based on coolant temp. The higher the temp, the lower the voltage.

The app showed voltage stuck at 0.75 V at 98 C.

Did have a slight issue where the car overheated. Pulled over immediately, unplugged the sensor, and instantly both the cooling and condenser fans kicked on.

After putting a new sensor in, voltage went even lower that the 0.75. I believe the normal range is between 0.2-1V in normal operating temp.

@PCB, would having low refrigerant cause my condenser fan not to engage when turning the AC on?
 

pcb

The Diagram Dude
:
2002 MP5
@PCB, would having low refrigerant cause my condenser fan not to engage when turning the AC on?

I have no idea,.. ??

Mr giggles or pb4ugotobed may know...

I don't really know how the AC works although I did manage to recharge mine ???
 
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Protege5
The cooling fan would not turn on after I stopped to wait for a train to cross. Waited for about 10 minutes.

When I read through the FSM, I found sensor voltage is based on coolant temp. The higher the temp, the lower the voltage.

The app showed voltage stuck at 0.75 V at 98 C.

Did have a slight issue where the car overheated. Pulled over immediately, unplugged the sensor, and instantly both the cooling and condenser fans kicked on.

After putting a new sensor in, voltage went even lower that the 0.75. I believe the normal range is between 0.2-1V in normal operating temp.

@PCB, would having low refrigerant cause my condenser fan not to engage when turning the AC on?

I don't think the condenser fan will run under normal conditions unless the compressor is running.
 

JazzySP20

Madaz
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AUSTRALIA
:
BJII Astina SP20
@PCB, would having low refrigerant cause my condenser fan not to engage when turning the AC on?

Yes. You can turn on the AC, but if refrigerant is low, the AC compressor clutch will not engage, and as a result, the AC fan does not work either.

I have been using Forscan lite also. The best OBDII app for Mazda / Ford.
 

Kedis82ZE8

'12 GX 460,'07 G35x / '15 CX-5 AWD GT w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
yugrus finally got me to test product out since he mentioned being able to see the rear diff clutch in action for the AWD.

It's in the 4x4PCM area and is called "Coupling Solenoid Duty Cycle"

He said you divide percentage in half to show how much is going to rear.

I'm seeing display show 13-14.5% driving down the road in D. I notice in a corner getting on it heavier it goes up to 25%. I also notice driving 30-35MPH and then downshift to 3rd and bring the revs up drops it down to around 8-9%.
 
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protege5
Yes. You can turn on the AC, but if refrigerant is low, the AC compressor clutch will not engage, and as a result, the AC fan does not work either.

I don't know about our car specifically because I've honestly never looked, but yes this is generally a true statement.

As a side note, and i have seen this before, that if the coolant is low (leaking radiator, etc) it can cause the AC to blow hot while at a stop, but then start blowing cold again when you start driving. I've seen this on several occasions on several cars where they thought they were low on refrigerant. Refrigerant levels were fine but since the radiator was low, it was causing excessive heat buildup on the condenser and now allowing it to "condense" and causing the AC to blow hot. Once they start driving, the airflow was enough to restore condenser operation (marginally, but functional enough to blow cool)

And I use the Toyota TechStream. Not designed for Mazda, and not as convenient as pulling it up on your phone because I use my laptop but it shows pretty much anything and everything.