EPB Caliper Question

:
2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
A 2016.5 CX-5 has 6/15 manufacture date? If 6/15 is indeed the manufacture date on the door jamb label, you have a 2016 CX-5.
Maybe not, Mazda started manufacturing the 2016's in early 2015. My 2016 that was purchased in April 2015 was built in Feb 2015. It's possible the .5's were being built in 2016.
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
Does it have the EPB? I think that is the most obvious change for the 16.5 midyear update.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Maybe not, Mazda started manufacturing the 2016's in early 2015. My 2016 that was purchased in April 2015 was built in Feb 2015. It's possible the .5's were being built in 2016.
jurgenk’s CX-5 has “DATE 6/15” on the door jamb label, his CX-5 was assembled in June, 2015. And his CX-5 is a 2016, not a 2016.5 MY for North American market.
 
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
A 2016.5 CX-5 has 6/15 manufacture date? If 6/15 is indeed the manufacture date on the door jamb label, you have a 2016 CX-5.
Cannot find my receipt, but I am wrong on the .5. Previous car was a '08.5 Mazda 3 that may explain the conflation and it does have the EPB.

P.S. I can post my VIN if that is helpful (and does not end up with me a victim of identity theft) and I purchased the car in September of 2015.
 
Last edited:

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Does it have the EPB? I think that is the most obvious change for the 16.5 midyear update.
Mazda had a major face-lift for gen-1 CX-5 in Nov. 2014 for 2015 MY worldwide, but chose to sell the same face-lifted CX-5 as 2016 CX-5 for North American market starting in Feb. 2015. EPB was added in that major face-lift.

My 2016 CX-5 was special-ordered in late Feb. 2015, and picked it up on 3/23/2015. It has “DATE 1/15” on door jamb label, and assembled in Jan. 2015.

Mazda started selling 2016.5 CX-5 in March, 2016 for North American market with minor feature re-arrangement for different trim levels.
 
Last edited:

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Cannot find my receipt, but I am wrong on the .5. Previous car was a '08.5 Mazda 3 that may explain the conflation and it does have the EPB.

P.S. I can post my VIN if that is helpful (and does not end up with me a victim of identity theft) and I purchased the car in September of 2015.
You have a 2016 CX-5 and your factory rear calipers definitely are original version with flaws, and both should be replaced with revised version for your best interest on safety. No need for VIN here.
 
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
You have a 2016 CX-5 and your factory rear calipers definitely are original version with flaws, and both should be replaced with revised version for your best interest on safety. No need for VIN here.
Thanks for the confirmation... I copied and pasted that list of parts needed you provided and have feelers out to my old local dealer and an Ontario (I am in northwestern BC) online Mazda parts retailer. Much appreciate the help....

Brad
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Thanks for the confirmation... I copied and pasted that list of parts needed you provided and have feelers out to my old local dealer and an Ontario (I am in northwestern BC) online Mazda parts retailer. Much appreciate the help....

Brad
Can’t emphasize it enough, either you’re going to do the rear brake job yourself, or you’ll have someone else doing it, make sure to know or mention the EPB Maintenance Mode and not turning the caliper piston while pushing it in.

Guide: Maintenance Mode for 2016 / 2017 CX-5 electronic brakes
 
Last edited:
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
An update regarding prices in the Canadian realm, costing me $570 just for the calipers seals and gaskets. Each caliper is $254 and, as usual, things are a little more expensive north of the border. Scarboro Mazda has been excellent to deal with and offer online shopping and free shipping to me in BC, which is greatly appreciated.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
An update regarding prices in the Canadian realm, costing me $570 just for the calipers seals and gaskets. Each caliper is $254 and, as usual, things are a little more expensive north of the border. Scarboro Mazda has been excellent to deal with and offer online shopping and free shipping to me in BC, which is greatly appreciated.
Many US CX-5 owners are getting excellent Canada-only Mazda OEM Premium floor liners online from MazdaShop / Scarborough Mazda in Canada too.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I wonder how aftermarket EPB calipers compare to OEM?
As I suspected, there’s almost nothing from aftermarket rear calipers with EPB for 2016 CX-5. The only thing I could find is from RockAuto, but it’s remanufactured caliper, and from the picture shown it doesn’t even look like the correct caliper with EPB.

73E42B12-F2D0-4BFD-9ACD-CA26FEF09B35.jpeg
 
Last edited:

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I wouldn’t consider any remanufactured Mazda CX-5 rear calipers with EPB as they may just have new piston and seal put in to a failed OEM caliper, and the root problem described in the TSB is still there.
 
Last edited:
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
Have just about got both sides done and then need to flush the brake system. Some thoughts; I am using Akebono ACT1846 pads and am still finding that I needed to grind the ears slightly and remove the wear indicators and still find the fit tight in the mount. I find placing the pads the worst part of the job as the abutment hardware seems to make the job difficult, but I am inexperienced with doing this.

I had the original pads out at one point to lubricate them and the slide pins and the pads seemed very stuck in their mounts when I removed them now. Wondering whether I had the pads back in properly or I over-lubricated the slide pins (and created a hydraulic with the pin that has a rubber wiper on it) causing the problem, but it certainly sounds like the EPB/caliper interace seems a very likely issue as well.

I am 56, doing this on my knees in the driveway and while this job would not be at all possible without the assistance of this forum and YouTube, it certainly makes me question doing it myself at times.

Brad
 
:
2022 2.5GT
Have just about got both sides done and then need to flush the brake system. Some thoughts; I am using Akebono ACT1846 pads and am still finding that I needed to grind the ears slightly and remove the wear indicators and still find the fit tight in the mount. I find placing the pads the worst part of the job as the abutment hardware seems to make the job difficult, but I am inexperienced with doing this.

I had the original pads out at one point to lubricate them and the slide pins and the pads seemed very stuck in their mounts when I removed them now. Wondering whether I had the pads back in properly or I over-lubricated the slide pins (and created a hydraulic with the pin that has a rubber wiper on it) causing the problem, but it certainly sounds like the EPB/caliper interace seems a very likely issue as well.

I am 56, doing this on my knees in the driveway and while this job would not be at all possible without the assistance of this forum and YouTube, it certainly makes me question doing it myself at times.

Brad
Akebono are a top notch manufacturer and rarely make things wrong. Keep in mind that if they are tight now, they’ll almost certainly bind with time. Are you sure you’ve got the right parts? They must be fitted with the stainless guides and you’re happy that maintenance mode is engaged. If there is any doubt I would go and buy another set off mazda. I was in R&D at Ferodo for 17 years and I’ve struggled with such things in the past but only ever succeeded if the parts are spot on.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Have just about got both sides done and then need to flush the brake system. Some thoughts; I am using Akebono ACT1846 pads and am still finding that I needed to grind the ears slightly and remove the wear indicators and still find the fit tight in the mount. I find placing the pads the worst part of the job as the abutment hardware seems to make the job difficult, but I am inexperienced with doing this.

I had the original pads out at one point to lubricate them and the slide pins and the pads seemed very stuck in their mounts when I removed them now. Wondering whether I had the pads back in properly or I over-lubricated the slide pins (and created a hydraulic with the pin that has a rubber wiper on it) causing the problem, but it certainly sounds like the EPB/caliper interace seems a very likely issue as well.

I am 56, doing this on my knees in the driveway and while this job would not be at all possible without the assistance of this forum and YouTube, it certainly makes me question doing it myself at times.

Brad
Thanks for the update.

Problems you’ve encountered with aftermarket brake pads are the reason why I’ll always get OEM parts, including brake pads and rotors, to guarantee the best fit. My time is valuable and I don’t want to deal with those surprises which can happen on many aftermarket parts. Reliability can be another issue too. Even with lifetime warranty on aftermarket pads, it’s still going to waste my time to make additional replacement if there’s any issues.

Make sure to use correct rubber friendly silicone grease such as AGS Sil-Glyde Silicone Lubricating Compound on your caliper pins. And make sure to read post #10 previously for proper bleeding procedures with EPB from Mazda Workshop Manual.

DIY sometimes is tiresome for older people but you know what you’re doing and what kind of parts you put in. A reliable shop is hard to find nowadays.
 
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
Used 3M silicone paste for the guide pins, it is in maintenance mode, the Akebono pads that I am using show to be correct, replaced the stainless clip hardware with the included Akebono which were identical, power wire brushed the brake mount slots before putting the hardware in, but still had fitment issues. I have a Powerstop front and rear kit that has yet to arrive, so now plan to button this all back up, bed the brakes and then will monitor them with an IR thermometer to see if the brakes are still dragging and then will replace the pads if there is still a problem.

If I continue to have issues with these aftermarket pads, will order some OEM pads online as the nearest Mazda dealership is ten hours away. Thank you so much to the two of you especially as your advice has been most helpful....
 
Last edited:
:
2022 2.5GT
Unfortunately this definitely is not normal. This means you have some internal leak within the brake master cylinder.
Just seen this and don’t wish to contradict but it probably is normal. It’s a function of the ABS pump to continuously back up pressure if you hold your foot hard on the brake - you can bottom the pedal quite easily, try it. The proper way to check if you have air in a modern ABS system is with the engine off. Pump the brake several times until the pedal becomes hard. There should only be the pedal linkage clearance right at the top and the pedal should be otherwise hard and impossible to press. Now a little experiment that will surprise you. Hold the pedal as hard as you can then start the engine. The pedal will creep right down to the floor. You are actually applying well over 100bar pressure at this time. It’s fine and there is nothing wrong as long as it won’t press after exhausting the vacuum with the engine off.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
⋯ Now a little experiment that will surprise you. Hold the pedal as hard as you can then start the engine. The pedal will creep right down to the floor. You are actually applying well over 100bar pressure at this time. It’s fine and there is nothing wrong as long as it won’t press after exhausting the vacuum with the engine off.
This statement indeed surprises me and I guess I learn something new everyday.

Now I just hope JR66 would give us some updates in his situation ⋯
 
:
'16 Mazda CX-5 GT
Just seen this and don’t wish to contradict but it probably is normal. It’s a function of the ABS pump to continuously back up pressure if you hold your foot hard on the brake - you can bottom the pedal quite easily, try it. The proper way to check if you have air in a modern ABS system is with the engine off. Pump the brake several times until the pedal becomes hard. There should only be the pedal linkage clearance right at the top and the pedal should be otherwise hard and impossible to press. Now a little experiment that will surprise you. Hold the pedal as hard as you can then start the engine. The pedal will creep right down to the floor. You are actually applying well over 100bar pressure at this time. It’s fine and there is nothing wrong as long as it won’t press after exhausting the vacuum with the engine off.
The tip on air in the vehicle brake system was a handy one as after I got it bled/flushed by myself, I found, what I thought to be, some spongyness in the pedal. Trying it with the motor off, there is definitely excess play in it and I will have to bleed again with a partner (or I could gravity bleed or I have a vaccum pump that I have never used) when I change over to winters. I did use the procedure described in post #10, other than doing it solo.
 

Latest posts