What Yokohama tires are these?

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Mazda
Hey guys,

So Mazda has the promotion to buy 3 and get the fourth tire for $1, the Yokohama Avid Ascend look pretty decent for the price $540 + tax installed. But I tried searching but nothing comes up for this particular model, only the LX or GT variations show up and not the generic version. Are these any good for the price? I've searched the forums and read about the one user here who upgraded his Yoko G91A to them.

Thanks for any help.

 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Hey guys,

So Mazda has the promotion to buy 3 and get the fourth tire for $1, the Yokohama Avid Ascend look pretty decent for the price $540 + tax installed. But I tried searching but nothing comes up for this particular model, only the LX or GT variations show up and not the generic version. Are these any good for the price? I've searched the forums and read about the one user here who upgraded his Yoko G91A to them.

Thanks for any help.

Yokohama AVID Ascend Grand Touring All-Season tire has been discontinued and you can see some specs from the comparison table I created earlier here:

225/65R17 Comparison Table

Yokohama AVID Ascend GT Grand Touring All-Season tire should be the replacement for AVID Ascend, but it doesn’t offer size 225/65R17 anymore.

Yokohama AVID Ascend LX Standard Touring All-Season tire is a different tire based on different category.

Here is Tire Rack’s ratings charts on Grand Touring All-Season tires from my post:

General AltiMAX RT43 - #4 out of 47
Yokohama AVID Ascend - #13 out of 47

I’d get General AltiMAX RT43 which can be had for about $520 a set before installation and sales tax.

Mazda Tire Center could misprinted the tire name as AVID Ascend has been discontinued. The “800 A A” UTQG indicates the tire Mazda sells could actually be AVID Ascend LX which carries the same UTQG, but the past AVID Ascend and AVID Ascend GT have “740 A A” UTQG.

Looking further from Mazda Tire Center, tire price is $141.61 each but $174.61 installed that’s really expensive for installation. I’d go to Discount Tire or America’s Tire to purchase tires with free lifetime flat repair、balancing、and rotation. And get mileage credit easily when you need the next set of tires.
 
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Pueblo county CO
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CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
I bought some tires from DT direct and took them to a nearby Wal-Mart for mounting. They charged about $25each for the mount and balance pkg.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Thanks for the detailed response, @yrwei52

I live in Bay Area so this link should be more reflective of the prices.

Firstly, the Mazda Tire Center link you provided is for 2018 Mazda CX-5 with size 225/65R17. My question is what trim level do you have on your 2018 CX-5 as only CX-5 Sport for 2018 MY uses this tire size.

With all the tires listed from Mazda Tire Center via your link, Yokohama AVID Ascend could be the best tire among all tires listed. But it still ranked #13 out of 47 Grand Touring All-Season tires. I definitely would check out different tires from my comparison table、Tire Rack website、Discount Tire Direct、and America’s Tire local store as you’re in Bay Area.

America’s Tire local store will do price match even to online tire price. Comparing tire services after the purchase to 2 tire stores, America’s Tire / Discount Tire has advantage of free lifetime tire rotation、balancing、flat repair, and easy mileage credit when you purchase the next set of tires.

Replacement for G91a tires
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
I had the plain Avid Ascends on my 2014 Toyota Sienna FWD. After 15,000 miles some of the outside tread was noticeably scrubbed off. At 25,000 miles there was chop in a couple of them. That's with rotations at around 7,500 miles and alignment at installation. I currently have the GT version. The GT is a much better tire, with even treadwear after 18,000 miles, lots of tread left, and they are pretty quiet and comfortable. They are somewhat iffy in resisting hydroplaning.

If budget is a primary consideration, you might want to look into the General Altimax RT43. I have no experience with them but Consumer Reports has been giving them high grades for a couple of years running.
 
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Mazda
Firstly, the Mazda Tire Center link you provided is for 2018 Mazda CX-5 with size 225/65R17. My question is what trim level do you have on your 2018 CX-5 as only CX-5 Sport for 2018 MY uses this tire size.

With all the tires listed from Mazda Tire Center via your link, Yokohama AVID Ascend could be the best tire among all tires listed. But it still ranked #13 out of 47 Grand Touring All-Season tires. I definitely would check out different tires from my comparison table、Tire Rack website、Discount Tire Direct、and America’s Tire local store as you’re in Bay Area.

America’s Tire local store will do price match even to online tire price. Comparing tire services after the purchase to 2 tire stores, America’s Tire / Discount Tire has advantage of free lifetime tire rotation、balancing、flat repair, and easy mileage credit when you purchase the next set of tires.

Replacement for G91a tires
Yeah I drive a 2018 CX-5 Sport. I'm bringing in my vehicle to the dealsership for an oil change this weekend and I'll check out their tire selection. I'm about due for new tires with 28K miles on the odometer. I'm hoping for a MIR instant rebate next month.
 
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Mazda
Upon returning from the dealership, they're a scam. Three months ago, they measured my tires at 4/32" and today they were at 6/32." The tire selections they had on the rack were not 17" so I didn't bother asking. I'll probably not return there again.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Upon returning from the dealership, they're a scam. Three months ago, they measured my tires at 4/32" and today they were at 6/32." The tire selections they had on the rack were not 17" so I didn't bother asking. I'll probably not return there again.
Actually this kind of thing happens unfortunately. You can’t expect car dealers to do every thing right to your vehicle. They want make more money, exaggerating the need of new tires may happen.

Your OE Yokohama Geolandar G91A 225/65R17 100H has “280 B A” UTQG which means the tread life is about 28,000 miles for easy calculation of course it depends on many other conditions. Your 2018 CX-5 Sport with 28K miles could be in the need of new set of tires. You can always get a tire tread depth gauge to measure the tread depth by yourself, or do an old fashioned penny test with a penny. Otherwise you may end up spending some money too early.

As mentioned before, you should go to a tire store such as America’s Tire / Discount Tire, or even Costco (although I understand there’re too many people there waiting, especially in California) to deal with your tire related questions or issues, not a car dealer.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
1/16" difference is not very much. If the tire wear is uneven side-to-side, as with my aforementioned Avids with the outside tread scrubbing off, it is not hard to find that difference on one tire depending on which tread you put the gauge in. Or if the tires are driven overinflated, the center tread will wear faster than the outer tread . If the alignment is off you will get uneven wear. The possibilities are several.

Unless you've measured all tires across the entire width to determine that your treadwear is even, this could be a case of one tech measuring where there is more tread vs. another more fastidious one measuring where there is less.

Personally, I would look at the lowest measurements you find. If it's 4/32 across most treads on a tire you're probably near done. I would not take a tire down to 3/32. It's not like tires are just fine and then magically go bad at 3/32--that's more the bottom limit-especially if you drive a lot in rain and snow. It stands to reason tire performance will gradually degrade as tread is lost.
 
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HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
Your OE Yokohama Geolandar G91A 225/65R17 100H has “280 B A” UTQG which means the tread life is about 28,000 miles for easy calculation of course it depends on many other conditions.
That's probably an honest assessment and often the expected life of an OEM tire. It seems manufacturers choose a tire for the test drive experience, not longevity.

I would offer a caution on UTQG treadwear ratings. Those ratings are self-regulated and self-assigned, whether they use an "independent" tester or not. Practically speaking, there is no government oversight at least in the US. Has anybody heard of tire manufacturer called on the carpet for overstating tire life? I haven't, yet some do with one model tire or another.

Consumer Reports offers a projected tire life based on 15,000 miles of testing. Their ratings show some tires underperforming the UTQG rating by a significant margin. A few outperform the manufacturer's UTQG.

Is UTQG better than nothing? Sure. But if tire life is priority I'd check Consumer Reports. Unfortunately, the number of makes and models they test is somewhat limited. There may be other similar testing sources, but I'm not aware of them. One could also look at the consumer reviews at Tire Rack to see what users have to say about their experiences. Some effort should be made to look beyond UTQG.
 
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HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
As mentioned before, you should go to a tire store such as America’s Tire / Discount Tire, or even Costco (although I understand there’re too many people there waiting, especially in California) to deal with your tire related questions or issues, not a car dealer.
No doubt. A dealership is probably the last place to buy tires. Even those Buy 3, Get 1 Free promotions are typically overpriced.

In my case, none of the options you mention are available within a reasonable distance. No Costco within 90 miles so I wouldn't have a membership; Dunn and Mavis, regional tire chains, dominate my market. I've used both. Mavis is typically a couple more bucks per tire but I'll use them again next time because their vibe and service is better, at least comparing the two shops nearby.

Some folks order their tires on-line and have them installed locally, Tire Rack being a common seller for that kind of thing. You have to call around to see who will install without sounding like you're a pain in the arse. It's more work and inconvenient, and when I've investigated this option the cost savings over going to the discount chains in minimal or non-existent, at least for the particular tires I've checked out.

I have no problem recommending Mavis which operates in 13 states from what I can tell quickly checking. But the main point is there are regional chains or even a small local outfit that might offer good prices and service. I used an outfit with one shop that offered very good prices and service when I lived outside Chicago, so the possibilities are various if one checks around.
 
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