Possible warped rotors?

I am on my fifth or sixth CX5 and love the car. However, I have had a problem with the brakes when the car is hot, particularly in mountainous regions. It seems to me as a layman to be a case of the rotors warping and creating a wubba wubba sound and feel. I looked around on the internet and didn't find anyone talking about this. I currently have a 2019 CX 5 Signature. I am looking for anyone experiencing the same issue.
 
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Pueblo county CO
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CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
I had my rotors warp on the west side going down Monarch Pass, not on my cx5 but I'm sure its possible
20200701_200754.jpg

It's about halfway between Parlin and Salida on this map, a little over 10,000 ft. Not the worst but pretty high altitude.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
Why I stopped using blanks.. they always ended up with heat spots, then you have to get them lathed ( a rip off considering you could probably buy a new set of blank rotors for the labor charge of lathing), or replaced hem. Now that I use drill and slotted it's unlikely ill ever need them lathed. I just change the pads for as little as $30 a set.
 

Jef

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2019 CX-5 grand touring reserve
I posted about this last month! I had the same noise coming from my rear right rotor when braking. I was told the rear rotors were out of round and pitted. Swapped under warranty with about 6200 miles on the dash.

 

tibimakai

San Dimas CA
:
USA
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2014 CX-5 Touring
Long downhills(?), I just downshift and save my brakes. Nice to have paddle shifters.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
I posted about this last month! I had the same noise coming from my rear right rotor when braking. I was told the rear rotors were out of round and pitted. Swapped under warranty with about 6200 miles on the dash.

Hate to say it, but this is probably just another example of the car business being run by bean counters today: use the cheapest minimalist parts you can to save a few bucks on manufacturing costs.

(Never mind that they end up paying more in the long run for early free replacements under warranty.)

These premature rotor failures are nothing more than Mazda using cheap materials that can't handle anything more than mom going to Costco once a week.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
Oh you have the bigger brakes, unfortunately, you won't find kits for <$200
 
:
CX5 GT-R
Had this issue on:
370z
Jeep grand Cherokee
Ws.6
2015 cx5
2019 cx5 GTR

In every case it's just overtorquing of the lugs and a bit o heat afterward. Nothing will save you except not overtorquing.
 

erhayes

Contributor
:
Mazda CX-5 FWD Touring
I tend to think Unobtanium is correct. Over-torqued or not torqued in the proper sequence will produced warped rotors when they get hot, like on a long downhill braking run. I have driven my CX5 down hills till the rotors were a dull red heat and never warped. Ed
 
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
In every case it's just overtorquing of the lugs and a bit o heat afterward. Nothing will save you except not overtorquing.
Ya, that's been mentioned more than once in other threads regarding warped rotors.
I've also mentioned before that the first thing I do after the wheels have been off at a garage for any reason, I loosen and re-torque all four wheel lug nuts when I get home.

They are always on too tight.

Young inexperienced techs with air guns set to max, and no regard for torque settings or staggered tightening methods.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Had this issue on:
370z
Jeep grand Cherokee
Ws.6
2015 cx5
2019 cx5 GTR

In every case it's just overtorquing of the lugs and a bit o heat afterward. Nothing will save you except not overtorquing.
While over-torquing could cause rotors warping, but it happens over time. It shouldn’t happen at least in Jef’s case. With only 6,262 miles on his 2019 GT-Reserve, his rear rotors definitely are manufacturing defect.

OP should take his 2019 CX-5 Signature to his Mazda dealer for a check ASAP especially if the mileage is low.

So picked up the car and was told that the rotors were pitted and out of round. That’s w
The wording used. New rotors but no mention of pads. The check list provides by the dealer ship showed rear pads at 80% and front at 90%
 
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I have just about 36,000 miles on the car. I drive it extensively and am often in the mountains of PA. Driving in mountainous regions is extremely hard on the brakes and this problem demonstrates it. I don't think downshifting is the answer for me. I'd probably wind up having to have tranny work.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
I have just about 36,000 miles on the car. I drive it extensively and am often in the mountains of PA. Driving in mountainous regions is extremely hard on the brakes and this problem demonstrates it. I don't think downshifting is the answer for me. I'd probably wind up having to have tranny work.
If I were you I’d take the CX-5 to Mazda dealer before new car warranty expires to check all the problems I can find, including the brake problem I can feel and hear without saying warped rotors although Mazda may not be willing to do brake job under warranty with your mileage but who knows they may find something else, and all TSB issues I can find even if the CX-5 may not show any symptoms at this time. It’s free anyway.

BTW, I don’t believe doing the engine brake with down-shifting would hurt transmission much. Use it without any hesitation.
 

madar

Contributor
:
2016.5 CX 5 Touring AWD, 2015 SCION XB
Had this issue on:
370z
Jeep grand Cherokee
Ws.6
2015 cx5
2019 cx5 GTR

In every case it's just overtorquing of the lugs and a bit o heat afterward. Nothing will save you except not overtorquing.
That's exactly why I always check lug nut tightness after coming home from the garage. Usually they're right on spec, but every once in a while they're a tad too tight.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
I think there is some huge confusion caused by the term (misnomer) "warped". More often than not the disc isn't actually warped like you might compare to a bent wheel or floppy pizza doughs.. it's actually high spots on the pad caused by brake pad material and rotor bonding. If your brakes were actually warped a lathe would have to take off so much material the rotor would probably be unusable afterwards. Imagine a shop using a lathe to repair a warped/bent wheel.

I'm sure dealers/shops love addressing "warped" wheels; the whole process generates a lot of shop hours and part markups. Brake rotors on some cars get RED hot during use and do not "warp". For the same reason sometimes people can successfully put a scrub pad on a high speed drill or angle grinder and remove the high spots on their rotors in the driveway

This is why I've switched to D/S rotors.. my driving style/high speed environment coupled with high outside temps cause my brakes to heat and retain heat. The oem and OEM style blanks ALWAYs became heat damaged by the end of the brake pad life. Since my new rotors have a greater cooling capacity (and yes technically a lesser thermal capacity), and the slot, the brake pad material is less like to bond uneven causing spots that result in vibration. I've noticed no reduction in braking performance, and I don't get fade anymore. Downside being that my pads wear quicker for the type of driving I do, but even cheap pads at $30 a set are adequate.. or I could (waste) spend more on high end pads.

Realistically, I'll never have to "lathe" these rotors, even with the cheap pads (really pads and IRON rotors are cheap regardless of the mark up) and cheap d/s rotor for the type of driving my CX-5 is capable of. I'd probably really start losing rotor width if I bought some high performance pads with a more aggressive compound, and honestly even in triple digits the generic ceramic type pads don't have me wanting to spend $100 or more on pads.

The hat on the brake is like a inch thick.. 10 or 30 foot lb difference isn't gonna actually warp your disc. You'd be more likely to warp a mag that's heated up and then hit a pothole while being poorly torqued than "warp" a rotor. If that's the case, every time a car went through a car wash it would come out with a "warped" rotor due to the flash cooling.

I'd put the conversation behind warped rotors up there with "higher octane fuel does nothing" in the automotive world of commonly misinterpreted or misinformation.

If you've ever seen metal transfer on a bearing it's not much different..one material gets embedded into another, which may or may not cause a noticeable issue.
 
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I think there is some huge confusion caused by the term (misnomer) "warped". More often than not the disc isn't actually warped like you might compare to a bent wheel or floppy pizza doughs.. it's actually high spots on the pad caused by brake pad material and rotor bonding. If your brakes were actually warped a lathe would have to take off so much material the rotor would probably be unusable afterwards. Imagine a shop using a lathe to repair a warped/bent wheel.

I'm sure dealers/shops love addressing "warped" wheels; the whole process generates a lot of shop hours and part markups. Brake rotors on some cars get RED hot during use and do not "warp". For the same reason sometimes people can successfully put a scrub pad on a high speed drill or angle grinder and remove the high spots on their rotors in the driveway

This is why I've switched to D/S rotors.. my driving style/high speed environment coupled with high outside temps cause my brakes to heat and retain heat. The oem and OEM style blanks ALWAYs became heat damaged by the end of the brake pad life. Since my new rotors have a greater cooling capacity (and yes technically a lesser thermal capacity), and the slot, the brake pad material is less like to bond uneven causing spots that result in vibration. I've noticed no reduction in braking performance, and I don't get fade anymore. Downside being that my pads wear quicker for the type of driving I do, but even cheap pads at $30 a set are adequate.. or I could (waste) spend more on high end pads.

Realistically, I'll never have to "lathe" these rotors, even with the cheap pads (really pads and IRON rotors are cheap regardless of the mark up) and cheap d/s rotor for the type of driving my CX-5 is capable of. I'd probably really start losing rotor width if I bought some high performance pads with a more aggressive compound, and honestly even in triple digits the generic ceramic type pads don't have me wanting to spend $100 or more on pads.

The hat on the brake is like a inch thick.. 10 or 30 foot lb difference isn't gonna actually warp your disc. You'd be more likely to warp a mag that's heated up and then hit a pothole while being poorly torqued than "warp" a rotor. If that's the case, every time a car went through a car wash it would come out with a "warped" rotor due to the flash cooling.

I'd put the conversation behind warped rotors up there with "higher octane fuel does nothing" in the automotive world of commonly misinterpreted or misinformation.

If you've ever seen metal transfer on a bearing it's not much different..one material gets embedded into another, which may or may not cause a noticeable issue.
Thanks. I am going to speak with a mechanic friend of mine and show him what you wrote. I appreciate it.
 
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