How many actual miles on a new car?

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2001 Mazda Protege
Hey guys - Thanks for taking time to comment, I appreciate it. Helpful to have your input, I ended up sharing my concerns with sales rep as some of you suggested, and he got defensive and snarky, "what else do you want, I gave you good deal" and "It's a done deal"...like that.

Instead of turning the relationship sour, I just thanked him and going to take my car and enjoy it. He better at least fill up the gas tank..When I test drove it, it was literally on 0 and I actually put a gallon in because I was worried it would run out!

Anyways - excited to be a CX-5 owner, nicest car I've ever had.
Wow you're far too much of a good guy my friend. I do have a thin skin when it comes to blantant disrespect like you described, and had I been in your shoes that sales rep would have gotten a mouthful back. Props on taking the high road just the same.

Just want to reiterate your point was totally legitimate. I have purchased five new cars and even with dozens of test drives I think only once I saw high mileage on a new car. It's a funny story - this was a Toyota Corolla I that drove in 2004 and it had I think around 300 miles. During the drive I haphazardly mentioned the mileage and the sales rep blungeoned me stating "this car will last hundred thousand miles". Obviously that's true but doesn't negate a customer's impression of the miles on a 'new' car.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Hey guys - Thanks for taking time to comment, I appreciate it. Helpful to have your input, I ended up sharing my concerns with sales rep as some of you suggested, and he got defensive and snarky, "what else do you want, I gave you good deal" and "It's a done deal"...like that.

Instead of turning the relationship sour, I just thanked him and going to take my car and enjoy it. He better at least fill up the gas tank..When I test drove it, it was literally on 0 and I actually put a gallon in because I was worried it would run out!

Anyways - excited to be a CX-5 owner, nicest car I've ever had.
If I were you I’d talk to sales manager directly, not the salesman.

Yep it’s the courtesy that the dealer will give you a full tank of gas for every new car they sold.
 
Wow you're far too much of a good guy my friend. I do have a thin skin when it comes to blantant disrespect like you described, and had I been in your shoes that sales rep would have gotten a mouthful back. Props on taking the high road just the same.

Just want to reiterate your point was totally legitimate. I have purchased five new cars and even with dozens of test drives I think only once I saw high mileage on a new car. It's a funny story - this was a Toyota Corolla I that drove in 2004 and it had I think around 300 miles. During the drive I haphazardly mentioned the mileage and the sales rep blungeoned me stating "this car will last hundred thousand miles". Obviously that's true but doesn't negate a customer's impression of the miles on a 'new' car.
Thanks - appreciate that. Yeah I try to not engage in something that is going to get hostile. Want to keep this experience as a positive one. The guy is in his 20s and probably doesn’t know any better.

I learned a lesson to be more selective who I buy car from in future. At end of the day, as long as the car runs as it should, everything is fine and I won’t need to deal with this person again.
 
I ended up sharing my concerns with sales rep as some of you suggested, and he got defensive and snarky, "what else do you want, I gave you good deal" and "It's a done deal"...like that.

Instead of turning the relationship sour, I just thanked him and going to take my car and enjoy it.
If I were you, I would unwind this deal and go elsewhere.
This is a foreshadowing of how they will treat you when you're in the F&I office finalizing the deal.

There is nothing special about this particular vehicle or dealership. There are dozens of dealerships selling hundreds of identical vehicles. Go elsewhere and don't reward these pricks.

I've bought a total of 4 new vehicles.
None of them had more than 5 miles on the odometer when I took delivery.

Does it matter that your vehicle has 61 miles on it? Probably not.
But when I'm spending $25K+ on a new car, I want a NEW car! Not one that's been on 4+ joyrides by people beating the crap out of it.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Thanks - appreciate that. Yeah I try to not engage in something that is going to get hostile. Want to keep this experience as a positive one. The guy is in his 20s and probably doesn’t know any better.

I learned a lesson to be more selective who I buy car from in future. At end of the day, as long as the car runs as it should, everything is fine and I won’t need to deal with this person again.
Although the salesman is young and may be inexperienced as a car sales person, IMO he should find a different job as his performance is unprofessional. Honestly salesman is a tough job, and needs good personality and wisdom dealing with all kind of different persons.

Yes, enjoy your new CX-5 and welcome to the forum!
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Google it. This 'cooling off' period as it's called in mostly a misconception, sorry.
After I Googled it, there’re conflict information about “cooling off” period on car purchasing in Texas. But as long as the car the OP singed with purchase agreement is not registered and titled with the State, I’d believe a car dealer would be happy to help the customer to switch to another car he wants, and be happy on both sides.
 
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2014 & 2019 CX-5 Touring(s)
I was told (though this was quite a few years back) that you had to drive the car off the dealer's lot to "take delivery". Up to that point the car wasn't officially sold. YMMV
 
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2019 Mazda CX-5 GT Reserve
Does it matter that your vehicle has 61 miles on it? Probably not.
But when I'm spending $25K+ on a new car, I want a NEW car! Not one that's been on 4+ joyrides by people beating the crap out of it.
In a similar scenario, I was recently car shopping with my son whose car was recently totaled in a flash flood. He decided to check out competitive SUV's. He likes my GTR & started there. Test drove CR-V & then went to test drive a RAV-4. The dealer had a definite lack of cars on the lot & said the only one I have available hasn't been prepped to drive yet. The salesman then proceeded to say I do have this RAV-4 here, which was sold & was sitting in the delivery bay waiting for it's new owner to arrive. He got the keys & told us we could test drive it by ourselves. As bad as I felt for the new owner we took them up on their test drive offer as my son was trying to make a decision on his purchase that day.
To me this just speaks very poorly of the dealership. If I have a deposit on a specific vehicle & an agreement of sale on said vehicle, I want the doors locked & nobody climbing around in it or driving it.
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
If you change to a different unit, all of the paperwork needs to be redone. This includes resubmitting the information to the bank that's doing the financing. It's a huge pain in the ass for everyone involved.

As a salesperson who has had this happen, the only way to really handle it is to grin and bear it and tell the sales manager what the issue is and hope that there is another vehicle on-hand with less miles. There's also a 90% chance of getting bitched out in front of everyone for the extra work it will involve, even if it's not your fault and you'll think that the stress isn't worth the $100-$200 you're making on the deal, and you'll be rethinking your career choice.
 

Bird-Dog

2017 CX-5 Touring 2020 CX-5 GTR
So many people here acting like the dealership was hiding something from the OP. That does not appear to be the case at all. The OP test drove the vehicle (contributing to those miles, BTW) and certainly would not have been denied the opportunity to re-inspect it before signing the deal, even if it was subsequently driven by other potential buyers.

Additionally, the odometer mileage is included right there on the paperwork one signs when purchasing or leasing a new car. That's what establishes the actual starting point of the warranty mileage.

Sorry, but you have an obligation to do your own due-diligence. Failing to pay attention to minor details that you later decide bother you is not the dealer being smarmy.
 
If you change to a different unit, all of the paperwork needs to be redone. This includes resubmitting the information to the bank that's doing the financing. It's a huge pain in the ass for everyone involved.
I don't know if that is the case. The OP said...
"I signed paperwork but haven't paid or driven the car off the lot."

It is not clear exactly what type of "paperwork" the OP signed.
But he could not have signed the important paperwork, or else the vehicle would be paid for and he would be driving it.
 

Natey

Moderator
Contributor
Patron
If I were you, I'd enjoy my new car and not worry about it. Those cars will go for decades if you treat 'em right and in the end, a few dozen miles won't be a biggie, I promise.

The guy at the grocery store isn't worried about picking out the best produce, and the guy at the donut shop isn't worried about finding the perfectly glazed one for you..

That's your job. (y)
 
So many people here acting like the dealership was hiding something from the OP. That does not appear to be the case at all. The OP test drove the vehicle (contributing to those miles, BTW) and certainly would not have been denied the opportunity to re-inspect it before signing the deal, even if it was subsequently driven by other potential buyers.

Additionally, the odometer mileage is included right there on the paperwork one signs when purchasing or leasing a new car. That's what establishes the actual starting point of the warranty mileage.

Sorry, but you have an obligation to do your own due-diligence. Failing to pay attention to minor details that you later decide bother you is not the dealer being smarmy.
Yes, I was aware of mileage when I signed the paperwork. What was unfortunate were the sales tactics and lack of professionalism.

I asked repeatedly if there was another same model on lot with less miles and he lied to me and said no (I later found there were 4 others, including the same color available).So this could have been easily avoided.

But ultimately yes, it's my responsibility and decision. I could have walked away, and went elsewhere, which in hindsight I should have considering the way salesperson attitude shifted once I had signed.
 
I asked repeatedly if there was another same model on lot with less miles and he lied to me and said no (I later found there were 4 others, including the same color available).So this could have been easily avoided.
Dealers want to get rid of their 'old stock' first.
They will push customers towards these older units and the salesperson may even get a higher commission for selling these cars.

For the last new vehicle I purchased, the dealer was desperate for me to take a vehicle on their lot.
It had ~60 miles on the odometer and already showed signs of wear...scrapes on the door sills, scratches on the interior plastics, ect.

I insisted on a vehicle that wasn't even on the lot yet. It was inbound from the factory and wouldn't be at the dealership for several more days. They of course obliged, as they didn't want to lose a sale.
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
Dealers want to get rid of their 'old stock' first.
They will push customers towards these older units and the salesperson may even get a higher commission for selling these cars.

For the last new vehicle I purchased, the dealer was desperate for me to take a vehicle on their lot.
It had ~60 miles on the odometer and already showed signs of wear...scrapes on the door sills, scratches on the interior plastics, ect.

I insisted on a vehicle that wasn't even on the lot yet. It was inbound from the factory and wouldn't be at the dealership for several more days. They of course obliged, as they didn't want to lose a sale.
Somewhat true. Old stock is determined by days on the lot though, and doesn't take into account miles at all. It's usually the cars that are on the showroom floor that show more wear after a while from people getting in and out all the time. Every new car dealer I've ever worked for will fix any scuff, scrapes, etc., that are pointed out at the time of purchase
 
Somewhat true. Old stock is determined by days on the lot though, and doesn't take into account miles at all.
I'm not sure what is only "somewhat true" about my post. I explicitly said "older stock" and "older units."
I also gave a specific example of what I'm talking about... it would be nearly impossible for a car sitting on a dealer's lot to have FEWER miles than one that is still in transit from the factory!
For commodity cars like the CX-5, surely you would agree that generally speaking, the longer cars sit on the lot the more miles they are likely to accumulate.

It's usually the cars that are on the showroom floor that show more wear after a while from people getting in and out all the time.
I'm not sure what your point is. Cars that have been on multiple joyrides/test drives are likely going to show wear, for the same reasons that cars on the showroom floor show wear. The point is, 4-6 families thrashing around in a car on a test drive is likely to cause some amount of wear.

Every new car dealer I've ever worked for will fix any scuff, scrapes, etc., that are pointed out at the time of purchase.
You have more faith in dealerships than I do. The people "fixing" this stuff at non-luxury dealerships are usually 20-year-old untrained hacks making minimum wage. Temporarily covering up scratches using glazes, adding swirls to your paint from a rotary polisher, burning through clearcoat, ect.

All of these types of dealership "fixes" are well-documented on this site and others.
 
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