CX-5 Caliper pin lube question

Hi all...I've been advised by the dealer service people that they do a brake caliper lube at 48k km. Does anyone know what is involved in this and how it's done? If I can, I'd like to do it myself. This is on a 2017 CX-5. Thanks in advance
 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
I might suggest a browse of the service manual

and then this thread:

and this video (not a Mazda CX-5; but does a great job at showing the parts in general)
 
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2019 CX5 Reserve AWD
Apparently there's not a lot involved since my dealer did it for free last time I had my car in for service.
 
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Pueblo county CO
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CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
The hard part is jacking up and removing the wheel. After that it takes about 5 minutes.
 

Chris_Top_Her

Banned
Moderator
Contributor
:
San Antonio, Texas
:
'15 CX-5 Miata AWD
I just use syglide. Get yourself some brake parts cleaner and an abrasive cloth to remove the s*** that might be caked on it.
 
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16.5 CX-5 Tour/AWD
Hi all...I've been advised by the dealer service people that they do a brake caliper lube at 48k km. Does anyone know what is involved in this and how it's done? If I can, I'd like to do it myself. This is on a 2017 CX-5. Thanks in advance
So what you'll need is silicone grease/paste. I use the 3M one since it comes in a bottle with a brush and lasts a long time.

3M 08946 Clear Silicone Paste

Before you even start, you'll need the right tools for the job and you'll need to put the car in emergency parking brake mode (EPB), especially for the rear brakes. You'll find it in the manual or in the forums for the steps.

Required Tools/Parts:

1. 3/8 or 1/2 breaker bar
2. A metric hex set
3. 3/8 or 1/2 Torque wrench
4. Silicone grease
5. Paper towels to wipe off any dirt or old grease off of the caliper slide pins
6. Brake caliper compressor since you'll be taking off the caliper and it'll need to be pushed back in so you'll definitely need a tool for that.

In addition, since you'll be lubricating the caliper slide pins, you might as well lubricate the brake pads also since the grease that was previously from the factory would've dried up already and you'll notice a significant increase in your pedal (smoother braking) after applying it. Get yourself some steel brushes to clean up the brake pad mounting hardware as well since there will definitely be a lot of gunk stuck inside of them.

Here's what I use:
Permatex 24125 Ceramic Extreme Brake Parts Lubricant, 8 oz., Pack of 1

Also, the rear brakes are much harder to access since you can't turn the steering wheel to make the pins stick out at a certain angle so you'll need to pretty much go behind it to see what you're doing. Just make sure you get good quality jack stands and a rubber pad that has a "slot/slit" adapter. Most jack stands do not have a "slot/slit" and the Mazda has pinch welds.
 
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erhayes

Contributor
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Mazda CX-5 FWD Touring
I don't think this is necessary at all and, it's not in the service manual. If I want to check, then fine but, to pay a dealer-I think not. JMO. Ed
 
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2017 Mazda 6 Sport
the service manual says to use a rubber grease for the caliper slide pins and a different grease for the pads. I used this for the pins

 
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13' CX-5 and 16' Mazda6 both Touring w/Tech/Bose
SuperLube and SilGlide are good with a 425 degree threshold. I still have a bottle myself. I highly recommend to switch to CRC Silaramic with a 3000 degree threhold. I got a bottle at Autozone.

Silicone Grease like above = lubing the caliper pins. Why? So calipers can move freely in and out squeezing and releasing pressure of pads unto rotors. Cause of issue = that grease is either too minimal or burnt off (hence why I recommend higher heat threshold). Why silicone? Because silicone is safe on rubber o-rings and other rubber parts on the pins. Other types of grease WILL wear out the rubber parts and cause them to expand.

Burping pins = air trapped will cause the pins to sort of seize up. Pinch the rubber grommet thingies on the caliper to help purge air when you manually slide pins in and out freely.

The "Other" grease = providing metal-to-metal lubing. Since the pads' metal sides and backing are constantly grinding and being pushed against other metal components they need high heat grease that won't run off, will stay put, and is thicker. If in doubt just stick to copper based grease.

Brake Cleaner = After all this lubing going on lol!!!....make sure to wipe off the rotor's surfaces using brake cleaner to remove grease. I like to also use it to clean calipers too

KY Lube = only for extreme backup purposes.
 
Last edited:

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
the service manual says to use a rubber grease for the caliper slide pins and a different grease for the pads. I used this for the pins

I‘ve been using AGS Sil-Glyde brake lubricant for caliper pins. But why this Super Lube is food grade and meets USDA guidelines? Is it edible? :unsure:
 
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2014 mazda cx-5 touring FWD
Food grade lubricant is used on machinery used to process food and is less or non-toxic if small amount contaminates food. And no, it's not recommended to eat it.
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
SuperLube and SilGlide are good with a 425 degree threshold. I still have a bottle myself. I highly recommend to switch to CRC Silaramic with a 3000 degree threhold. I got a bottle at Autozone.

Silicone Grease like above = lubing the caliper pins. Why? So calipers can move freely in and out squeezing and releasing pressure of pads unto rotors. Cause of issue = that grease is either too minimal or burnt off (hence why I recommend higher heat threshold). Why silicone? Because silicone is safe on rubber o-rings and other rubber parts on the pins. Other types of grease WILL wear out the rubber parts and cause them to expand.

Burping pins = air trapped will cause the pins to sort of seize up. Pinch the rubber grommet thingies on the caliper to help purge air when you manually slide pins in and out freely.

The "Other" grease = providing metal-to-metal lubing. Since the pads' metal sides and backing are constantly grinding and being pushed against other metal components they need high heat grease that won't run off, will stay put, and is thicker. If in doubt just stick to copper based grease.

Brake Cleaner = After all this lubing going on lol!!!....make sure to wipe off the rotor's surfaces using brake cleaner to remove grease. I like to also use it to clean calipers too

KY Lube = only for extreme backup purposes.
CRC Silaramic doesn't appear to be silicone. The description says " A synthetic, dry-film, ceramic lubricant ".

CRC Silaramic
 
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