CX-30 takes forever to warm up

sm1ke

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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
I think this is common with most current Mazdas. They warm up much faster once you start driving them (this has been true for all of the cars I've owned/driven in -35 to -50c temps, not just my CX-9). Start it up, let it idle for a couple of mins, then drive it. It should warm up with 5-10 mins of driving. Seat heaters and steering wheel heat should come through much quicker.
 
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2020 CX 30
I’m starting to think you might be on to something, DI. I’ve noticed mine takes ages to reach normal operating temp, though to be fair most of my trips of late have been local and less than 10k. Even so, it does seem to take an awfully long time to warm up. I’ve got a 500k trip over two days starting Friday, so I’ll keep an eye on it and see what happens.
 
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2020 CX 30
Update: Nope, warm up is fine. It DOES take a while to get there, but a cold snap here confirmed that everything is behaving the way it should, albeit slowly.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
I have the 2.5L in my 2020 CX-5 Touring and the engine warms pretty darn fast. I'm not up on every model and trim, but doesn't the CX-30 have the same engine unless you have the turbo option?

I don't warm at idle, just start up, turn on the heated seats, make sure the climate control off, and go. In modern fuel injection engines idling to warm does nothing to prevent engine wear. To give you some idea, it's about a 1/10 of a mile creep to get out of my housing development. That's more than sufficient for the sake of the engine. From there it is 50 MPH 2-lane blacktop in all directions. At about 2 miles down those roads the the coolant temp light goes off. That's faster than in my V6 Sienna or my previous V6 Accord, or any other vehicle I've had as best as I can remember.

The coolant temp light going off is my cue to turn on the climate control where it will start blowing warm, I jack it up to max temp, and then dial it back as it starts blowing hotter and the cabin warms up. I should say the vehicle is kept in an attached garage where the temp rarely gets below freezing.

Assuming you have the same engine, I would say if you can somehow simulate this warmup routine and you don't see the coolant temp light go off is pretty short order, the previous suggestion to have the thermostat checked might be a good idea.

This does remind of a nit pick with this otherwise fine vehicle--the climate temperature control is way too finely incremented. You don't turn that dial, you have to spin it, or spin-spin-spin-spin to get it to move 10 degrees.
 
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2014 Mazda3 S GT auto, 2008 MX5 6-speed
The coolant temp blue icon in my dash goes out at 130 degrees F in my Mazda3. On a 70 degree day, the coolant reaches this temp after about 1.2 miles.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
The coolant temp blue icon in my dash goes out at 130 degrees F in my Mazda3. On a 70 degree day, the coolant reaches this temp after about 1.2 miles.
Sounds right. My earlier comment that it takes about 2 miles in my CX-5 was referencing colder weather, around freezing.
 

HardRightEdg

US 2020 CX-5 Touring AWD Soul Red
The coolant temp blue icon in my dash goes out at 130 degrees F in my Mazda3. On a 70 degree day, the coolant reaches this temp after about 1.2 miles.
Sounds right to me. My earlier comment that it takes about 2 miles @ 50 mph in my CX-5 was referencing colder weather, around freezing. Not that it matters now. Again, warming up for the sake of the engine is a waste of time and gas unless you in the habit of zoom zooming from dead cold.
 
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2014 Mazda3 S GT auto, 2008 MX5 6-speed
I believe that in some German cars the redline changes with oil temperature, which is the most important media when it comes to changes in viscosity due to temperature.