Guide: 2nd Generation CX-9: Aftermarket oil catch can installation

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2018 CX-9 GT
I've been reading this thread with the anticipation of instilling a catch can on my '18 GT, but it seems that there is a small amount (or none as in sm1ke's case) of oil vapor being reclaimed. In reading the Mazda threads, such as this one, echoes what's being discussed above: Drive your car to operating temperatures and do get on it every once in a while. That being said, is the catch can really necessary if we drive like Zoom Zoom? :)
 

sm1ke

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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
I've been reading this thread with the anticipation of instilling a catch can on my '18 GT, but it seems that there is a small amount (or none as in sm1ke's case) of oil vapor being reclaimed. In reading the Mazda threads, such as this one, echoes what's being discussed above: Drive your car to operating temperatures and do get on it every once in a while. That being said, is the catch can really necessary if we drive like Zoom Zoom? :)

Honestly, we won't know for sure unless we get some 2nd gen CX-9 owners with 100k to do a valve inspection, and report their style of driving and their location.

With that said, some of the cars that have had serious carbon build-up issues (some Audis, 2nd generation Lexus IS250s, etc.) have shown symptoms starting as early as 30k. These symptoms usually manifest as excessive engine vibration, poor gas mileage, and decreased performance. As long as your car isn't exhibiting these systems, there's nothing to worry about. Personally, I owned a 2nd gen IS250 for a few years and never had any issues. It had 90000 miles when I sold it, and it didn't have any carbon build-up symptoms. I drove it year round, my drives were always long enough to get the engine up to operating temps, and I did let the car stretch its legs every once in a while.

With my CX-9, I drive it like the IS250. It's driven year round, my drives are always 10-30 mins long, and I like to push the engine now and then (probably more often than I should, lol). The catch can, in my case, was just a preventative measure. I honestly believe now that it has to do with the bronze sintered filter that is included on some catch cans, but not on mine. I can't think of any other reason for why I'm not collecting any blow by.
 

sm1ke

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'18 CX-9 Signature
https://corksport.com/mazda-6-2.5l-turbo-oil-catch-can-kit.html

It seems that there is a problem in the place where we installed, and the pipe that should be near the firewall needs to be modified.

Thanks linxiabing, the installation is indeed quite different. I'm going to purchase more supplies for this installation and try to tackle it on a warm day, then report back and update as necessary.

Just a note - this installation does appear to be correct by all accounts, as the OCC is meant to go between the PCV valve and the intake manifold port. It seems to work for other owners, maybe just not for me. But I will try this alternative method. At the very least, it looks like doing it this way will prevent any blowby from ever making it into the intake manifold via the PCV valve.
 
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Mazda CX-9 Signature
https://corksport.com/mazda-6-2.5l-turbo-oil-catch-can-kit.html

It seems that there is a problem in the place where we installed, and the pipe that should be near the firewall needs to be modified.

That's definitely interesting. It seems complicated for sure. Can someone explain to me the engineering behind this install route? And that seems excessive for what it caught with 500 miles. You must have to drain it multiple times between oil change
 

sm1ke

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That's definitely interesting. It seems complicated for sure. Can someone explain to me the engineering behind this install route? And that seems excessive for what it caught with 500 miles. You must have to drain it multiple times between oil change

It does seem excessive. They mention that the first time the catch can is installed this way, it catches an excessive amount of blowby, and that it should be changed shortly after install. Then they say that the can should be changed every 3000 miles or few months.
 
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NS, Canada
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2020 CX-5 GT Turbo
Thanks linxiabing, the installation is indeed quite different. I'm going to purchase more supplies for this installation and try to tackle it on a warm day, then report back and update as necessary.

Have you made any changes? I'm considering the CorkSport system for my turbo CX-5 and very interested in your results if you changed the installation method to resemble what CorkSport recommends.
 
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Mazda, 2016 CX-9 Signature
I know this thread been going on for a couple of years but I bought the Cork Sport OCC 4 months ago or so and I am just getting around to installing it. I was talking to CX9-guy and he said the bracket didn't fit on the CX-9. He addressed it to Cork Sport but they don't have a fix. They did take it off their CX-9 site. I am going to call them tomorrow but my question is Cork Sport mounts the OCC low and I have seen people mount it high by the battery box. Any issues with mounting it high?
 

sm1ke

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Have you made any changes? I'm considering the CorkSport system for my turbo CX-5 and very interested in your results if you changed the installation method to resemble what CorkSport recommends.

I haven't gotten around to it yet, there's actually a bunch of stuff I need to get to. The way I installed it, it still isn't catching anything more than a very thin layer of oil, but I think others have installed it the same way and had no issues.

I will see if I can get to it this weekend.
 
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Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring 2016
There are a couple of other things happening. Engine makers are doing a much better job of designing ways of catching the oil before it goes to the intake manifold as evidenced by the catch cans catching nothing. Oil makers are improving the oil. API Service Category SN+ has lower (or no) ash additives that won't build up the deposits like older oil formulations did. The newest oil categories are:
API SP: "Introduced in May 2020, designed to provide protection against low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI), timing chain wear protection, improved high temperature deposit protection for pistons and turbochargers, and more stringent sludge and varnish control. API SP with Resource Conserving matches ILSAC GF-6A by combining API SP performance with improved fuel economy, emission control system protection and protection of engines operating on ethanol-containing fuels up to E85."

https://www.api.org/products-and-se...-and-classifications/oil-categories#tab-ilsac

Note that the new ILSAC GF-6B is only for 0W-16 oils. It has the same benefits as GF-6A.
API is the American Petroleum Institute. ILSAC is the International Lubricants Standardization and Approval Committee, mainly U.S. and Japanese automakers. Every few years the automakers, oil makers, and chemical suppliers work together to develop improved engine oil standards. In addition many engine makers have their own specs such as GM's dexos. Follow your owner's manual for oil specs, except the new specs are always compatible with the old spec and are superior. The oil spec'ed for our engines, SN and GF-5 oil, is no longer made.
 

sm1ke

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Sorry guys, I completely forgot to update this thread. I added a NOTE to the original post. Here is a copy of what was added.

*** NOTE: 08/14/2020 - The PCV hose identified in this guide is the same hose that CorkSport identifies as the PCV hose in their installation instructions (see here), but they use a different method of installation that involves capping the intake manifold port and tapping the valve cover hose near the turbo intake pipe. Since CorkSport's installation involves the removal of two "permanent" clamps from the valve cover hose, I chose to install it in a different way. Removal of those "permanent" clamps on the valve cover hose could result in some headaches (or a flat out denial of warranty) if I ever had any engine issues that would normally have been covered under warranty.

In short, I haven't changed anything from the original install, aside from changing the mounting location (plumbing remains the same) for testing purposes. I now have about 44000 kms on the car, and I have never been able to get anything more than a very light film on the inside of the can. The car has been running perfectly fine the whole time.

When the car is out of warranty, I may try installing it using CorkSport's instructions. Until then, short of maybe trying a different OCC, my setup will remain the same, and I will just assume that the PCV system is already very good at what it does.
 
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Mazda, 2016 CX-9 Signature
I installed the Cork Sport OCC a couple of months ago. Then drove it on a 600 mile trip. I drained at least 3 ounces of liquid out of the can. I don't drive the car much so I can't tell you anything past that point. When I get to 1000 miles I will check again. I do agree that the permanent clamps are a real pain. The ID on the Cork Sport hose could be a little bigger. It was almost impossible to get it on the Mazda fittings.
 
Sm1ke, I just follow this post recently and planning to install the occ as well. I saw a different way of you installing the occ than corksport. You just routing the pcv hose while corksport beside pcv hose, they also routing the hose from engine back to turbo (hose with permanent clamp).

My question is whether it is necessary to route the hose with permanent clamp like the one shown by corksport or it is okay just to route the hose from pcv? If we just go back to the standard on why you need the occ.

Second is if I just capped the intake manifold and vent out the pcv hose, is the permanent clamp hose (the one from engine back to turbo) still working? What I mean is whether it is still circulating the exhaust gas? My guess is not because I have capped the intake manifold outlet. But if it still circulating, is it possible to just capped also the turbo inlet port and vent out the valve cover port as well?

Sorry for my bad english and confusing question.

Thank you.
 

sm1ke

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Sm1ke, I just follow this post recently and planning to install the occ as well. I saw a different way of you installing the occ than corksport. You just routing the pcv hose while corksport beside pcv hose, they also routing the hose from engine back to turbo (hose with permanent clamp).

My question is whether it is necessary to route the hose with permanent clamp like the one shown by corksport or it is okay just to route the hose from pcv? If we just go back to the standard on why you need the occ.

Second is if I just capped the intake manifold and vent out the pcv hose, is the permanent clamp hose (the one from engine back to turbo) still working? What I mean is whether it is still circulating the exhaust gas? My guess is not because I have capped the intake manifold outlet. But if it still circulating, is it possible to just capped also the turbo inlet port and vent out the valve cover port as well?

Sorry for my bad english and confusing question.

Thank you.

Hi H29o, all I can say is that the way I have the hoses routed is the same way that a few others have routed their catch cans, and they are getting blowby. Also, I'm sure CorkSport knows more about the OCC plumbing than I do, so there must be a reason for why the hoses are run that way. I've seen at least one other brand of OCC with the hoses set up just like the CorkSport OCC. The only reason I haven't attempted running the hoses the same way that CorkSport has is because of the permanent clamp that you have to remove. I don't want to give the dealership any reason to deny a warranty claim should I ever need to make a claim, and all of the mods I've done so far can be returned to stock if I need to.

For now I will keep the OCC the way it is. Maybe you can email CorkSport to see why they route the hoses the way that they do?
 
Hi H29o, all I can say is that the way I have the hoses routed is the same way that a few others have routed their catch cans, and they are getting blowby. Also, I'm sure CorkSport knows more about the OCC plumbing than I do, so there must be a reason for why the hoses are run that way. I've seen at least one other brand of OCC with the hoses set up just like the CorkSport OCC. The only reason I haven't attempted running the hoses the same way that CorkSport has is because of the permanent clamp that you have to remove. I don't want to give the dealership any reason to deny a warranty claim should I ever need to make a claim, and all of the mods I've done so far can be returned to stock if I need to.

For now I will keep the OCC the way it is. Maybe you can email CorkSport to see why they route the hoses the way that they do?

That is weird if other got blowby but you dont with the same setup :) I think I will email CorkSport and post the answer that I got from them here. Thank you Sm1ke!
 

sm1ke

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That is weird if other got blowby but you dont with the same setup :) I think I will email CorkSport and post the answer that I got from them here. Thank you Sm1ke!

That would be really helpful! Thanks H29o
 
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Mazda, 2016 CX-9 Signature
I have had my Cork Sport OCC on for about 6 months. Does anyone have a problem with odor after the install of the Cork Sport OCC?
 
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