2019 CX-5 Turbo engine...Bad fuel economy?

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2019 CX-5 Signature
16.8 seems abnormally low, even with a pretty heavy foot. If you're driving conservatively, you should easily be in the low 20's. I'm 80-90% highway with lots of traffic and run 28 - 28.5 on every single tankful.

If you're sitting at 5 lights for a minute each during your 2 mile commute, you will not come close to low 20's. I can understand how those that have 80-90% Hwy commutes can't comprehend this, though. In my Lexus, I went from a 25 mile commute, averaging ~26 mpg's, to about 14 when it became a 2 mile commute to the train station. This is just how it is. If it bothered me, I would get a hybrid, or full electric.
 
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2019 CX-5 Signature
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This past weekend i drove on the highway (right after filling up the tank to full) with about 1 hr drive each way cruising at 70 mph and the best i could get was 23.5 mpg.
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Assuming you reset the average, or refueled immediately upon returning and hand calculated, I would say that is low. Ours that is averaging below 20 was able to hit 30 on a trip we took over the summer.
 
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2019 CX-5 GTR
Assuming you reset the average, or refueled immediately upon returning and hand calculated, I would say that is low. Ours that is averaging below 20 was able to hit 30 on a trip we took over the summer.

I reset the average before filling up the tank.

Even on highways, the numbers are bad.
 

erhayes

Contributor
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CX5 Reserve
My GTR is averaging about 2 mpg lower than my 2014 CX5 touring or about 26 mpg of urban easy driving. I found that the easy way to get lower mileage is to not drive smoothly and using the power often. There is some technique to using turbo power in an efficient manner. Ed
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
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Canada
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'18 CX-9 Signature
My GTR is averaging about 2 mpg lower than my 2014 CX5 touring or about 26 mpg of urban easy driving. I found that the easy way to get lower mileage is to not drive smoothly and using the power often. There is some technique to using turbo power in an efficient manner. Ed

This has been my experience with my CX-9 as well. I would guess that getting up to speed faster means the engine spends less overall time in the upper RPM range, leading to better mileage?
 
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2021 CX-9 Sig
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2014 CX-5 GT
My GTR is averaging about 2 mpg lower than my 2014 CX5 touring or about 26 mpg of urban easy driving. I found that the easy way to get lower mileage is to not drive smoothly and using the power often. There is some technique to using turbo power in an efficient manner. Ed

Yeah, averaged 24.4 MPG on my 2018 CX-9 Signature and in the first 6000 miles of my new CX-9 am averaging, 24.1 MPG (all on fuelly).

The MPG you get is all in the way you drive. I found that for all my Mazda's getting up to speed quickly and then keeping off the gas and brake works best. Maintain speed through corners as well and actually keep lightly on the accelerator to keep your speed through. I averaged 26.5 MPG on my 2014 CX-5 and the 24 MPG on the CX-9 looks pretty consistent as well.
 
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CX5 GT-R
Lifetime average so far.
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Phoenix
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2020 CX5 signature
A general observation today. While I leave the stop light at what I consider a non-rushed start, I see most others accelerate rather quickly before reachind the posted speed limit. They're not racing it, per se, but where I take a more more leisured approach, most others seem to be a little heavy footed and eager to reach the posted 45. Maybe they're fine and I'm the slow poke, but I'll never notice those 3 extra seconds to get to the speed limit.

Conversely, If I find myself a even a small bit more aggressive I'll notice the MPG difference.

YMMV, literally and figuratively.
 
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2021 CX-5T AWD CE
I recall an article in one of the car magazines a few years back that addressed the driving habits that affected fuel economy. Most of their conclusions were obvious, but it was surprising that slowly accelerating a car to cruise speed can actually use more gas than quicker acceleration. The reason is that cars don’t hit their peak fuel efficiency until 40-50 mph, so if you take a longer time getting there, the car spends more of its time at less-efficient speeds. Of course, this assumes that you’re not racing away just to have to brake to a stop at the next light a block away.

In fact, if you have a manual transmission car, it’s been shown that heavy throttle, even full throttle, and short shifting (shifting into as high a gear as possible as quickly as possible) is the most efficient way to reach a given speed. The wide-open throttle reduces engine pumping losses past the partially-closed throttle plate and the short shifting reduces the frictional losses associated with high RPM.

So inching your way up to speed isn’t necessarily the most efficient.

Looking far ahead so you can drive smoothly to avoid braking trumps everything else. Braking is what sucks the living daylights out of gas mileage and is the reason hybrids get so much better city fuel mileage.

- Mark
 
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CX-5 2017 GT AWD
I recall an article in one of the car magazines a few years back that addressed the driving habits that affected fuel economy. Most of their conclusions were obvious, but it was surprising that slowly accelerating a car to cruise speed can actually use more gas than quicker acceleration. The reason is that cars don’t hit their peak fuel efficiency until 40-50 mph, so if you take a longer time getting there, the car spends more of its time at less-efficient speeds. Of course, this assumes that you’re not racing away just to have to brake to a stop at the next light a block away.

So inching your way up to speed isn’t necessarily the most efficient.

- Mark
Exactly how to hit a better MPG. Open your throttle and as you hit your desired speed ease on the throttle and cruise along. Do this and observe your INSTANT MPG.