2017~2021 2018 Rear Brake Adjustment

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2018 Mazda CX-5 GT
My 2018 CX5 GT only has about 7,000 Km on it and is 1 1/2 years old. I take it in for an oil change every 6 months. At the last oil change my Mazda service manager told me that the rear brakes need adjusting so that they do not drag. I told him that I did not have time for that service now and just do the oil change. I checked the service manual and it makes no mention of any brake service this early. As I'm about do for my next oil change I'm sure he will bring this topic up again, and I'm sure it will not be free. Can someone please clarify for me what this brake adjustment service is about and if it is required this early, or if my service manager is just taking me for a ride. Thanks
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
My 2018 CX5 GT only has about 7,000 Km on it and is 1 1/2 years old. I take it in for an oil change every 6 months. At the last oil change my Mazda service manager told me that the rear brakes need adjusting so that they do not drag. I told him that I did not have time for that service now and just do the oil change. I checked the service manual and it makes no mention of any brake service this early. As I'm about do for my next oil change I'm sure he will bring this topic up again, and I'm sure it will not be free. Can someone please clarify for me what this brake adjustment service is about and if it is required this early, or if my service manager is just taking me for a ride. Thanks
There’s no “adjustment” needed for your rear disk brakes. If the rear disk brakes do have dragging issue, the caliper pins of your CX-5 may need lubrication or it may have problems on rear disk brake calipers with EPB. Since your 2018 CX-5 with only 7,000 km / 4,350 miles is only 1 and a half years old, any brake dragging issue should be covered under warranty. Call Mazda Canada to make a case, so that if your Mazda dealer wants to charge you for the dragging problem, you want Mazda Canada to pay it for you.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
That's BS at it's finest.
In the old days with drum brakes, they could be adjusted, and most likely needed it.
Today's disc brakes don't need "adjusting".
If they are dragging, it's because there's a problem, most likely sticking caliper pins.
They should be cleaned and lubed once a year, so maybe that's what he's referring to.....and yes, you'll pay for the privilege.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
There’s no “adjustment” needed for your rear disk brakes. If the rear disk brakes do have dragging issue, the caliper pins of your CX-5 may need lubrication or it may have problems on rear disk brake calipers with EPB. Since your 2018 CX-5 with only 7,000 km / 4,350 miles is only 1 and a half years old, any brake dragging issue should be covered under warranty. Call Mazda Canada to make a case, so that if your Mazda dealer wants to charge you for the dragging problem, you want Mazda Canada to pay it for you.
Good luck with that. I've had the same issues with my rear brakes, and Mazda Canada and my dealer blew me off.
You'll get no warranty support for this problem, as it's a wear and tear item, according to Mazda Canada.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
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Plano, Texas, USA
Good luck with that. I've had the same issues with my rear brakes, and Mazda Canada and my dealer blew me off.
You'll get no warranty support for this problem, as it's a wear and tear item, according to Mazda Canada.
Disk dragging issue is not the wear and tear problem. That’s why there’s a TSB for such problem on my 2016 CX-5 and the whole rear brake including calipers got replaced under warranty a week before my 3-year warranty expired. Yeah I know Mazda Canada may have different opinion on such issue which is unfortunate, but that dragging TSB is for world wide including Canada.

I’d at least call Mazds Canada and see if I were the OP. You never know.
 

The ManLaw

The Manlaw of Want
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15cx5 soon 20cx9
According to the service manager at my dealership, he thinks mazda will be issuing a recall for the rear calipers and such within the next 6 months. They're replacing everything under warranty for anyone who has any issues with the rear brakes on the 16.5, 17 and 18s.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
According to the service manager at my dealership, he thinks mazda will be issuing a recall for the rear calipers and such within the next 6 months. They're replacing everything under warranty for anyone who has any issues with the rear brakes on the 16.5, 17 and 18s.
All models, or just the CX-5?
 

The ManLaw

The Manlaw of Want
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15cx5 soon 20cx9
He was talking about the cx5s in general but if the part numbers are the same for the cx9s or any other model im sure they will be covered as well. The only thing im not too sure of with this is that since it's still a wear and tear part, they may just run with the tsb that is out. If the caliper locks up, you just won't be able to drive it. On the same note, a severely prematurely worn caliper is very dangerous. Everyone is used to most cars with disks all around that run 60% front 40% rear bias give or take. The rears should outlast the front by a considerable amount of time.
 
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2018 CX-5 Sport
My 2018 CX5 GT only has about 7,000 Km on it and is 1 1/2 years old. I take it in for an oil change every 6 months. At the last oil change my Mazda service manager told me that the rear brakes need adjusting so that they do not drag. I told him that I did not have time for that service now and just do the oil change. I checked the service manual and it makes no mention of any brake service this early. As I'm about do for my next oil change I'm sure he will bring this topic up again, and I'm sure it will not be free. Can someone please clarify for me what this brake adjustment service is about and if it is required this early, or if my service manager is just taking me for a ride. Thanks
He must mean lube the pins. One poster said it should be done once a year. I never lube pins in between brake pad changes. There is a rubber seal that keeps water and dirt out, and grease in. But now I might inspect my brakes while the weather is warm. I think yours should be done for free, dragging brakes is a manufacturing flaw.
 
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Ottawa, Ontario
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17 Mazda 6 GT
The rears should outlast the front by a considerable amount of time.
Unfortunately, that's not the case these days, and not just with Mazda.
Personally, every car I've had with 4 wheel discs has always had the rears go first.
There was a discussion about this on here a while back, and it certainly seems that this is the norm now. The fronts last longer.
Part of the reason is that the rear brakes are now designed to actually engage first, to prevent nose diving when stopping.

"The modern 4 wheel disc brake motor car has an anti-dive braking feature in most cases. They also have split systems to allow some braking to still occur when any single hydraulic line fails. The rear brake piston (primary) in the master cylinder moves past the fluid intake port and pushes until rigid, to operate the rear brakes. Then the front brake piston (secondary) pushes against a stronger spring that is stopped by the rigid primary cylinder in front of it, moves past the fluid inlet, then presses until rigid. So the rear brakes are applied first, then the front.

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Yes there are design components such as limiters that adjust the rear pressure, but generally when lightly braking, the car does not dive down on every pedal push. Coming to rest judiciously allows the rear brakes to do the final full stop, which lets the passenger feel more comfortable by not being thrown forward and down. It is a real problem that the majority of drivers only know how to quickly jamb the brakes down to almost lock the front wheels every time they brake, and bypass this design feature. Cars with drum brakes at the rear will have a different set up to prevent the self servo action of the drum brakes from locking the rear wheels."
 

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