2014 CX5 Tune-Up items to replace?

:
2014 CX-5 Sport
If you shop at O'Reily's they have a wix brand atf filter for the cx-5 that comes with a gasket. When I did my valve cover gasket I used hondabond ht, Id probably use that again for the trans pan if I had to but I'm going.to use the wix because it has the gasket with it.
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
Have heard gaskets are more leak prone than sealant applied properly.

so I just found oil collecting around the OCV despite me just putting a brand new OEM seal in the valve cover. This is disappointing. Any ideas?

this is after I wiped it off, but there was oil all over the harness plug and around the edge of the seal itself.

C8D66731-3856-439B-86FF-3B3833935DDA.jpeg

716736D4-3209-414D-9BF5-C595AFABC40E.jpeg
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Have heard gaskets are more leak prone than sealant applied properly.

so I just found oil collecting around the OCV despite me just putting a brand new OEM seal in the valve cover. This is disappointing. Any ideas?

this is after I wiped it off, but there was oil all over the harness plug and around the edge of the seal itself.

View attachment 294956
View attachment 294957
My guess is your Oil Control Valve itself is leaking. I guess I’ll do all 3 (valve cover gasket、oil control valve seal、oil control valve) when it’s time for me to do them.

I have heard other users in this repair having found out it was the OCV itself that was leaking. Keeping that in mind, and using the video for instruction I replaced all 3, OCV, OCV gasket, and valve cover gasket. Thanks for the video it was helpful.
It’s a follow up here. Turns out there were 3 separate issues.

oil control valve started leaking at the bottom of the engine, and was the source of the dripping.
Valve cover was seeping oil.
Oil pan was also seeping a bit.
All fixed up and good to go.
Maybe I’ll get another 170,000km out of it? Maybe.
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
Well dang, there’s another $100+ part.

In other news, I got the trans drain pan off, cleaned up, filter changed and all sealed up again. I found 3 of those snapups from my Integra oil pan job so I made use of them. Mazda sealant smells exactly like Permatex Ultra Grey, so I’m doing what Permatex says and waiting an hour before I put final torque on the bolts.

Bolts all cleaned up. I took out the 4 worst ones and replaced those with the new ones. I lightly clamped my Dremel into the vise, with a brass brush, and held each bolt in needle nose vise grips. Made it very easy.
707EA2B6-130F-4EF4-B8EC-4C14D8233D2E.jpeg

The Mazda sealant comes with this genius key to roll up the end of the tube and force the sealant out. Works like a charm! Definitely hanging onto that to use with my other sealant tubes.
47B944D4-7FEF-4468-9630-3B9AB6DDAE12.jpeg

Drain pan all cleaned up. I scraped the larger sealant pieces with a razor blade, then hit the rest of it with the Dremel and brushes. The inner edge of the old sealant came off easily with a plastic bristle brush. For the outer edge I used the brass brush with the absolute lightest touch, just enough to get the sealant off without marring the pan finish. When done I gave it a final IPA wipe down.
92DA792E-26D0-469A-B27C-6B6D237B30EA.jpeg
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
With no drain pan the valve body constantly dripped which was rather annoying. I got most of the old sealant off the flange with a razor blade, then use a handheld brass brush to get the rest off. Came out nice and clean. Then I installed the new filter, and also chased all the bolt holes with a tap. Except for 2 that I couldn’t get the tap in straight because of the subframe.
5423B8C6-6EFB-4866-9A47-8CF21B40D009.jpeg

New sealant on the pan. The tube says to apply a continuous bead to one surface, so that’s what I did. Old sealant showed evidence of going around each hole so I did that, too.
A36654E7-D860-4EF8-97F7-6FDA60E61348.jpeg
All back together now. In a closeup shot I can see the sealant just starting to squeeze out, just like the original sealant was. This is with the bolts only snugged down by hand with a nut driver, in a criss cross pattern. After posting this I’m about to go back out and put the final 88 in-lb on each bolt, since it’s been about an hour.
277C2BEE-18BD-4E13-9601-4870FA4ECAA9.jpeg

DC8DC47E-6226-4B9C-88DF-40ECA92AA409.jpeg


All in all not a hard job. Just time consuming because I was working slow and methodically. Since Permatex recommends letting the part cure for 24 hrs before putting back in service, I’m at least going to wait until tomorrow afternoon, or evening, before filling with at least 5 quarts of fluid. I guess because I drained the fluid after the car had been sitting several hours, I got a whole 4 quarts to drain out. Then the drain pan had another quart and the filter a bit more.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Well dang, there’s another $100+ part.

In other news, I got the trans drain pan off, cleaned up, filter changed and all sealed up again. I found 3 of those snapups from my Integra oil pan job so I made use of them. Mazda sealant smells exactly like Permatex Ultra Grey, so I’m doing what Permatex says and waiting an hour before I put final torque on the bolts.

Bolts all cleaned up. I took out the 4 worst ones and replaced those with the new ones. I lightly clamped my Dremel into the vise, with a brass brush, and held each bolt in needle nose vise grips. Made it very easy.
View attachment 294964
The Mazda sealant comes with this genius key to roll up the end of the tube and force the sealant out. Works like a charm! Definitely hanging onto that to use with my other sealant tubes.
View attachment 294965
Drain pan all cleaned up. I scraped the larger sealant pieces with a razor blade, then hit the rest of it with the Dremel and brushes. The inner edge of the old sealant came off easily with a plastic bristle brush. For the outer edge I used the brass brush with the absolute lightest touch, just enough to get the sealant off without marring the pan finish. When done I gave it a final IPA wipe down.
View attachment 294966
Thanks for sharing your experience.

How much crud and sludge accumulated on the magnet and ATF pan after 113K miles?

Looks like OEM Mazda RTV Silicone Gasket Maker 0000-77-1217-ES is the way to go only for that key alone.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
With no drain pan the valve body constantly dripped which was rather annoying. I got most of the old sealant off the flange with a razor blade, then use a handheld brass brush to get the rest off. Came out nice and clean. Then I installed the new filter, and also chased all the bolt holes with a tap. Except for 2 that I couldn’t get the tap in straight because of the subframe.
View attachment 294970
New sealant on the pan. The tube says to apply a continuous bead to one surface, so that’s what I did. Old sealant showed evidence of going around each hole so I did that, too.
View attachment 294971 All back together now. In a closeup shot I can see the sealant just starting to squeeze out, just like the original sealant was. This is with the bolts only snugged down by hand with a nut driver, in a criss cross pattern. After posting this I’m about to go back out and put the final 88 in-lb on each bolt, since it’s been about an hour.
View attachment 294972
View attachment 294973

All in all not a hard job. Just time consuming because I was working slow and methodically. Since Permatex recommends letting the part cure for 24 hrs before putting back in service, I’m at least going to wait until tomorrow afternoon, or evening, before filling with at least 5 quarts of fluid. I guess because I drained the fluid after the car had been sitting several hours, I got a whole 4 quarts to drain out. Then the drain pan had another quart and the filter a bit more.
So did you actually use snapups to put the pan back? Do you think these Fel-Pro 6mm Bolt Oil Pan SnapUps are worth it to help positioning the pan?


And I don’t believe there’s a schematic in FSM showing specific sequence of criss cross pattern to tighten the ATF pan bolt up like the valve cover bolts?
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
So did you actually use snapups to put the pan back? Do you think these Fel-Pro 6mm Bolt Oil Pan SnapUps are worth it to help positioning the pan?



And I don’t believe there’s a schematic in FSM showing specific sequence of criss cross pattern to tighten the ATF pan bolt up like the valve cover bolts?

The ones I used were the Fel-Pro snapups. I installed a Fel-Pro PermaDry oil pan gasket on my Integra a couple of years ago. It came with 4 of the snapups but one of them broke, so I still had 3. Same 6x1.0 thread. I actually ran my 6mm thread die over the plastic threads to make them thread into the transmission a little easier.

I think they're worth it simply to get the holes all aligned properly. Although I think the sealant itself would have held it in place. The snapups are mainly for dry gasket installations, like Honda oil pans, where there's nothing to hold the pan in position before the bolts go in. Some shorter, cut off bolts might have been a little easier, but I didn't have any of sufficient length handy, and plus I didn't want to take the time to cut off several bolt heads and then slot the ends.

And take it from me, with that type of thin steel oil pan, tightening in a crisscross pattern is just common sense. Those types of pans can warp easily.
 
:
2014 CX-5 Touring
Got the gearbox filled back up tonight. It would only take 4 quarts at first and it was at the very tip top of the dipstick. Ran the car to 122 deg ATF temp, checked it again and it didn’t register on the dipstick at all. Added one more quart while engine was running, which put it right on the dipstick mark. That pretty much matches what I drained out with dropping the pan and filter.
Drove the car around a bit and all seems good. No evidence of any leaks. I’m going to drive the car some tomorrow, then change the oil before a road trip later this week, so I’ll check the drain pan one last time before putting the lower cover back on.

Also I did the math on fluid replacement. If capacity is 8.2 quarts, I drained and refilled about 3.7 quarts the first time, 3.7 the second time, and 5 quarts this last time. That means old fluid concentration should only be about 12%. If I were to drop the pan again and put in 5 more quarts it would drop to only 4% old fluid, but that’s an expensive and IMHO excessive proposition for likely no return.

also, after getting the ATF up to temp, my OCV looked like this. Guess I’ll look at getting a replacement. Would I need to change my brand new valve cover gasket again also?
DA0BA707-3D2F-4FF3-B685-4A9A6D612826.jpeg
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
⋯ also, after getting the ATF up to temp, my OCV looked like this. Guess I’ll look at getting a replacement. Would I need to change my brand new valve cover gasket again also?
View attachment 295015
It took me a while to figure out the part number of this problematic Oil Control Valve (OCV). In the beginning I thought it’s:

Control Valve - Mazda (PE01-14-440A) $110.57

But that OCV is located on the side of the engine above the oil filter. The leaky OCV you have on engine top actually is Variable Valve Timing (VVT) Solenoid:

Control Valve Solenoid - Mazda (PE01-14-420A) $188.72

Consider the high price of this OCV solenoid, I’d just spend additional $35 for valve cover gasket and OCV seal, although I believe you should be able to re-use these 2.

Control Valve Solenoid - Mazda (PE01-14-420A) $188.72

Valve Cover Gasket - Mazda (PY01-10-235) $20.84

Engine Valve Cover Washer Seal - Mazda (PE01-10-2D5)
$15.00


9C17B3C6-FBFF-482F-B238-DC75D0C6E486.png

1DC0D625-FBA7-40B6-8D37-22C65E08CD5E.jpeg


30F98811-8C8B-4ACC-8F13-DDF499237CAE.jpeg

3B05955A-A87D-4EF0-8BEC-F81BF976B4D2.jpeg
 
Last edited:

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Since there’re a couple of places on valve cover gasket which require additional silicon sealant, hopefully the valve cover gasket won’t get damaged in these areas if you plan to re-use it.

58782368-9836-44D0-9FDD-4DB8BDBEE9A4.jpeg

A0456825-B042-4743-973C-10E6B7D0E9F4.jpeg

A6EA50E6-B3D1-49BE-A7AB-2C0D0B4F71C1.jpeg
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
⋯ How much crud and sludge accumulated on the magnet and ATF pan after 113K miles?
Still would like to know this out of curiosity. If you can post some pictures that would be even better!
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
It took me a while to figure out the part number of this problematic Oil Control Valve (OCV). In the beginning I thought it’s:

Control Valve - Mazda (PE01-14-440A) $110.57

But that OCV is located on the side of the engine above the oil filter. The leaky OCV you have on engine top actually is Variable Valve Timing (VVT) Solenoid:

Control Valve Solenoid - Mazda (PE01-14-420A) $188.72

Consider the high price of this OCV solenoid, I’d just spend additional $35 for valve cover gasket and OCV seal, although I believe you should be able to re-use these 2.

Control Valve Solenoid - Mazda (PE01-14-420A) $188.72

Valve Cover Gasket - Mazda (PY01-10-235) $20.84

Engine Valve Cover Washer Seal - Mazda (PE01-10-2D5)
$15.00


View attachment 295017
View attachment 295018

View attachment 295019
View attachment 295020
And one more suggestion on OEM parts source for OCV solenoid PE01-14-420A. This eBay seller partsouq is the international automotive parts seller partsouq.com located in Sharjah, north of Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Somehow they manage fast shipping to the US and the price is great!

72357F04-3750-4C11-8B3D-9F57C66F5980.jpeg


2345E6FE-3270-4750-B3BF-E671457AC789.jpeg


This eBay seller partsouq has 10737 and 99.6% positive feedbacks with eBay money back guarantee. And some members have tried them and got Japanese Tokyo Roki PE01-14-302B oil filter in 3 days!

Thank you for confirming
🙂
. If anybody wants the Japan made filters for either the 2.5 NA or 2.5T engines, you can get them from partsouq.com. They are in Dubai but ship worldwide. I just ordered 20 filters for both my 2.5 and 2.5T and should be here Thursday. Total with 3 day air shipping was $200 so $10 a piece for oem Japan made filters. If you change every 5k then buy bulk and save
 
:
2020 CX-5 AWD
... OCV looked like this. Guess I’ll look at getting a replacement. ....
Very nice job and well written report on the fluid change(y)

Here's an alternative to immediately buying and replacing that OCV valve. The oil leak is undoubtedly a result of an internal seal breaking down, and IMO the actual operation of the valve is unaffected by the leak. So the idea I'm proposing is to replace that seal by building a new one on the outside of the valve.

It starts by first getting the oil completely removed from the surface of the valve, and hopefully not having it seep back into the gap (after a couple iterations if necessary). If it remains clean and dry, then it simply becomes a matter of working a bit of your RTV into the gap where the leak is coming from, and perhaps overlap it a bit on each side. Then wait 24 hours for the RTV to completely cure.

Now your first reaction to what I wrote above will probably be Redneck, and yes it is indeed! But the bottom line for any repair would be if it works or not. And in this case, you have nothing to lose if it doesn't work, except a few minutes of your time.

Around four years ago, I noticed a weep leak coming from the oil pan on my Kia Forte, and did exactly what I described above to the seal area of the pan, along with snugging up some of the pan bolts which had become loose. I had fully intended this to be a very short term and temporary patch, and planned to do a gasket replacement in the Spring when warmer weather showed up. However, that 'temporary' patch remained weep free (to this day), so I've never been given any reason to fix what is no longer broken.

If you're a strictly-by-the-book guy, then this type of thing will not appeal to you, and I can understand that point of view. But I wanted to send it your way, just in case you're someone who is willing to occasionally travel off the straight and narrow pathway.
 

yrwei52

2016 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech Pkg
Contributor
:
Plano, Texas, USA
Very nice job and well written report on the fluid change(y)

Here's an alternative to immediately buying and replacing that OCV valve. The oil leak is undoubtedly a result of an internal seal breaking down, and IMO the actual operation of the valve is unaffected by the leak. So the idea I'm proposing is to replace that seal by building a new one on the outside of the valve.

It starts by first getting the oil completely removed from the surface of the valve, and hopefully not having it seep back into the gap (after a couple iterations if necessary). If it remains clean and dry, then it simply becomes a matter of working a bit of your RTV into the gap where the leak is coming from, and perhaps overlap it a bit on each side. Then wait 24 hours for the RTV to completely cure.

Now your first reaction to what I wrote above will probably be Redneck, and yes it is indeed! But the bottom line for any repair would be if it works or not. And in this case, you have nothing to lose if it doesn't work, except a few minutes of your time.

Around four years ago, I noticed a weep leak coming from the oil pan on my Kia Forte, and did exactly what I described above to the seal area of the pan, along with snugging up some of the pan bolts which had become loose. I had fully intended this to be a very short term and temporary patch, and planned to do a gasket replacement in the Spring when warmer weather showed up. However, that 'temporary' patch remained weep free (to this day), so I've never been given any reason to fix what is no longer broken.

If you're a strictly-by-the-book guy, then this type of thing will not appeal to you, and I can understand that point of view. But I wanted to send it your way, just in case you're someone who is willing to occasionally travel off the straight and narrow pathway.
IMO, the oil leak on this oil control valve solenoid is different from the oil pan leak. The leak on OCV is pressure related, whereas the oil pan is not. If the internal seal of OCV is broken, it will change the internal oil pressure of OCV which regulates the variable valve timing. And since it’s pressurized, I doubt the extra layer of silicon sealant applied between the gap of solenoid and valve outside can actually do something to prevent oil leak pressurized from inside.
 
:
2020 CX-5 AWD
... And since it’s pressurized, I doubt the extra layer of silicon sealant applied between the gap of solenoid and valve outside can actually do something to prevent oil leak pressurized from inside.
Well, I already had conceded that this might not work. But the point I was trying to make is this is a VERY easy and zero $$ thing to try, with nothing lost if it fails to work. I would always be up for trying something like that, but you and anyone else are free to reject it out of hand as you choose.
 
:
2014 Mazda CX-5 GT AWD w/Tech
Just an FYI to you younger folks (I am 66) that are amazed at the "key" to squeeze out the RTV sealant. They've been around for decades and were commonly used, at least in my "always use everything to the last drop" household, to get all the toothpaste out of the tube!

You can get a whole mess of 'em on Amazon for cheap! :cool:
 
:
Pueblo county CO
:
CX-5 Sport 16.5 6M
Very nice job and well written report on the fluid change(y)

Here's an alternative to immediately buying and replacing that OCV valve. The oil leak is undoubtedly a result of an internal seal breaking down, and IMO the actual operation of the valve is unaffected by the leak. So the idea I'm proposing is to replace that seal by building a new one on the outside of the valve.

It starts by first getting the oil completely removed from the surface of the valve, and hopefully not having it seep back into the gap (after a couple iterations if necessary). If it remains clean and dry, then it simply becomes a matter of working a bit of your RTV into the gap where the leak is coming from, and perhaps overlap it a bit on each side. Then wait 24 hours for the RTV to completely cure.

Now your first reaction to what I wrote above will probably be Redneck, and yes it is indeed! But the bottom line for any repair would be if it works or not. And in this case, you have nothing to lose if it doesn't work, except a few minutes of your time.

Around four years ago, I noticed a weep leak coming from the oil pan on my Kia Forte, and did exactly what I described above to the seal area of the pan, along with snugging up some of the pan bolts which had become loose. I had fully intended this to be a very short term and temporary patch, and planned to do a gasket replacement in the Spring when warmer weather showed up. However, that 'temporary' patch remained weep free (to this day), so I've never been given any reason to fix what is no longer broken.

If you're a strictly-by-the-book guy, then this type of thing will not appeal to you, and I can understand that point of view. But I wanted to send it your way, just in case you're someone who is willing to occasionally travel off the straight and narrow pathway.
I wonder if there is a certain type of RTV sealant with this kind of application in mind.

I would be concerned about how well the stuff would adhere to an oily surface