0W20 for 2020 CX-5 GTR?

Eric

2020 CX-5 GTR
Hi there. I just got first oil change for my 2020 CX-5 GTR at the dealer today. I noticed that they use 0W20 instead of 5W30 (according to the owner manual).

Would it be ok for that?
 

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
...and _IF_ that happened then that’s what you’d use as ‘proof’ the dealer caused the problem and so get it covered.

No need for hysterics. Simple fix, and no damage done.

Or you could resolve the issue right now and avoid the headache entirely. 🤷‍♂️
 
Upvote 0

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
I’ve advocated that since entering the thread. The item you quoted was a very simple way to dispel unnecessary hysteria.

Actually, you advocated not doing anything and to just drive the car conservatively until the next oil change. Just to confirm, how conservatively, exactly? Do not exceed 4k RPM? 3k, 2k?

You also suggested that others were being overly paranoid in their suggestions to resolve the issue as soon as possible.

In any case, those are your opinions and you are entitled to them.
 
Upvote 0
:
'15 6, '06 5
Nope. I advocated resolving the issue. I furthermore explained the largest risk from using 0W20 vs 5W30, and expressly said to try to work it out with the dealer. If that doesn’t work I said to move on and not use them. I even told Eric how to mitigate the increased risk from a 0W20 (if that’s what’s in his engine, which no one has yet demonstrated). I even took the extra step to show how to beat back the fear-mongering claims that this will void his warranty. If the dealer claims their own mistake caused an engine problem, that in itself is their claim that they are liable for it.

You incorrectly assumed or inferred everything else, and asked no questions.

Others here have brought unnecessary hysteria. This is an easy one to deal with, and there are multiple ways to deal with it. Among them: Work it out with the dealer (my first suggestion). Choose a different provider (another suggestion I made). Drive conservatively until the viscosity is verified or the fluid is changed (also my suggestion).

I see that you have now (finally) asked a question rather than making presumptive declarations. Cap the load on the main and rod bearings by not opening the throttle near wide open. This reduces max load on those bearings. In other words, drive conservatively.
 
Upvote 0

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Nope. I advocated resolving the issue. I furthermore explained the largest risk from using 0W20 vs 5W30, and expressly said to try to work it out with the dealer. If that doesn’t work I said to move on and not use them. I even told Eric how to mitigate the increased risk from a 0W20 (if that’s what’s in his engine, which no one has yet demonstrated). I even took the extra step to show how to beat back the fear-mongering claims that this will void his warranty. If the dealer claims their own mistake caused an engine problem, that in itself is their claim that they are liable for it.

You incorrectly assumed or inferred everything else, and asked no questions.

Others here have brought unnecessary hysteria. This is an easy one to deal with, and there are multiple ways to deal with it. Among them: Work it out with the dealer (my first suggestion). Choose a different provider (another suggestion I made). Drive conservatively until the viscosity is verified or the fluid is changed (also my suggestion).

I see that you have now (finally) asked a question rather than making presumptive declarations. Cap the load on the main and rod bearings by not opening the throttle near wide open. This reduces max load on those bearings. In other words, drive conservatively.


To clarify, your first post in this thread:

Don't let the paranoia from some here get to you, Eric. Speaking in broad generalities, 0W20 offers reduced main and rod bearing protection compared to 5W30. HOWEVER, you can completely mitigate that by driving conservatively. Do that and there'll be zero harm of any sort.

As to the replacement of oil and filter (if you determine that's necessary), work it out with the dealer if you can. If you can't, move on and maybe choose a different service provider next time. If in the end you're dissatisfied with that provider, just remember that this is not an expensive experience.

You suggest driving conservatively until the oil is changed. Then you suggest working out the problem of the oil and filter with the dealer, just like everyone else suggested, except you said that "if you can't work it out with the dealer, just move on and choose a different service provider next time". I don't know if it was your intention to write it that way, but it reads in a way that suggests that if the OP can't resolve the issue with the dealer, to just "move on" and not worry about the potential issue of the wrong oil and/or filter being on the car.

Either way, thank you for clarifying.
 
Upvote 0
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
Bickering is not going to help the OP with his dilemma.
Given your little spat, it's telling that he hasn't been back here for a few days, don't you think?

Anyway, getting back on track, what I'd like to know is (with verifiable data and not just guesses) is: what are the actual risks involved with running the lighter oil and the filter from a non turbo engine in the turbo version?
I highly doubt the actual innards of the two engines are any different, so talk of damaging rod and crank bearings seems a little extreme. I'd like some hard data from either one of you to verify that.
Secondly, doesn't the wrong oil and filter issue have more to do with possible long term damage to the turbo itself, as opposed to the engines' innards? Again, maybe one of you can clarify that for us, with facts to back it up.
In the meantime, we can only hope the OP has had a chance to verify what oil filter the dealer actually installed, and that he can get things rectified with said dealer.
 
Upvote 0
lol, you guys crack me up. You don't trust the dealer because what the service advisor says doesn't match the invoice but yet if everything matched, you would trust it 100%??? How does that work? Do you do an oil analysis after every change just to ensure the oil put in matches what's on the invoice?

It's already been pointed out that, under normal conditions, the difference in oil (and probably filter as well) isn't going to make a difference so I won't rehash that. The question becomes: do you want the 'right' oil or do you want the dealer to fix their mistake? Those two points are not equal.
 
Upvote 0

sm1ke

Work In Progress..
Moderator
Contributor
:
Canada
:
'18 CX-9 Signature
Bickering is not going to help the OP with his dilemma.
Given your little spat, it's telling that he hasn't been back here for a few days, don't you think?

Anyway, getting back on track, what I'd like to know is (with verifiable data and not just guesses) is: what are the actual risks involved with running the lighter oil and the filter from a non turbo engine in the turbo version?
I highly doubt the actual innards of the two engines are any different, so talk of damaging rod and crank bearings seems a little extreme. I'd like some hard data from either one of you to verify that.
Secondly, doesn't the wrong oil and filter issue have more to do with possible long term damage to the turbo itself, as opposed to the engines' innards? Again, maybe one of you can clarify that for us, with facts to back it up.
In the meantime, we can only hope the OP has had a chance to verify what oil filter the dealer actually installed, and that he can get things rectified with said dealer.

I apologize for my part in creating the tangent.

I don't have any hard data, unfortunately. All that's available to me at the moment is the fact that Mazda lists an oil filter specific to the 2.5T engine, and that Mazda recommends using only 5W-30 oil that meets their specifications for the 2.5T. For the sake of maintaining the powertrain warranty, I would stick to the turbo-specific oil filter and ensure that only 5W-30 oil is used, and I would make sure that all of my documentation reflects that. In this situation, bare minimum I would get the paperwork corrected, but ideally I would have the oil changed again and visually verify that the correct filter is used before the car comes off the lift.

I am well aware that there are aftermarket oil filters that are sold as compatible for both the 2.5 and 2.5T, and I'm sure there are people out there who use them with no issues. But again, for the sake of maintaining the warranty, I don't use those filters (or the 1WPE filter) just to avoid the potential headache of having to prove to Mazda that there is no difference between their 1WPY filter and 1WPE filter (which would then prove that those universal filters work just fine), in the rare event that there is an engine/turbo issue in the future. I come from a position of doing what I can right now to avoid a mess later on.

lol, you guys crack me up. You don't trust the dealer because what the service advisor says doesn't match the invoice but yet if everything matched, you would trust it 100%??? How does that work? Do you do an oil analysis after every change just to ensure the oil put in matches what's on the invoice?

It's already been pointed out that, under normal conditions, the difference in oil (and probably filter as well) isn't going to make a difference so I won't rehash that. The question becomes: do you want the 'right' oil or do you want the dealer to fix their mistake? Those two points are not equal.

If the paperwork is correct (meaning the oil and filter listed are the correct parts for the application), Mazda can't use it as a reason to deny warranty coverage. For that reason, I think the bare minimum that should be done is getting the paperwork corrected.
 
Upvote 0
:
2013 CX-5 Sport Manual
After my last oil change, I noticed they put oil over the max line (yes, checked cold). Then everyone laughs at me that I have trust issues. Idiots. I am back to changing it my self. Costco has currently 0w-20 and 5w30 Kirkland brand - 10qt for $22 after $3 off. Expires 12/27/20 in store only (not advertised so it may not be everywhere).
 
Upvote 0
:
Ottawa, Ontario
:
17 Mazda 6 GT
If @Eric is still out there, I'd love to see an update. We never got an answer back on whether you went under the car and checked the filter part number.

Eric???
 
Upvote 0
:
2020 CX-5 GTR
Hi there. I just got first oil change for my 2020 CX-5 GTR at the dealer today. I noticed that they use 0W20 instead of 5W30 (according to the owner manual).

Would it be ok for that?
I had my GTR 1st oil change last week and was kind of dreading this because I know how bad dealership services departments can be on many different levels. So knowing that they see a lot more non-turbo GT CX5 than turbo ones, and GTR really has nothing on the exterior on inside that jumps out and says 'I'm a Turbo', I arguably had good reason to think something could go wrong with even a simple oil change.

In my case the invoice I received does say that they used 5W30. That made me feel good. I figured it was pretty clear that the car used 5W30 since oil cap clearly says 5W30 in bright yellow lettering. Even though that was stated I really have no idea what the tech put in or what the delivery equipment looks like that they use to pump bulk oil into the various engines that they service.

After reading this thread in its entirety, I edited this post from it's original version. I also will be checking the oil filter's part number on the invoice now that I know the correct Mazda part number for the turbo filter. Lastly i will crawl under the car to get a look at the actual filter installed.

My only reason for concern in my case is that my gas mileage somehow seems slightly improved since the dealer performed the oil change. This is more subjective than objective because I'm not keeping any accurate mileage logs. If in reality I am actually getting better mileage , is it because 0W20 was used. This too may be erroneous conclusion that is based on the notion that engine works less with lighter viscosity oils and get slightly better gas mileage. This is based on my days spent on Prius enthusiasts forums where posters were sometimes obsessed with squeezing everything they could out of gallon of gas. They messed with every variable imaginable including oil weights.
 
Last edited:
Upvote 0